Usa – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 10:00:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Usa – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 How the manager of a jazz association spends her Sundays https://iridiumjazz.com/how-the-manager-of-a-jazz-association-spends-her-sundays/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 10:00:22 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/how-the-manager-of-a-jazz-association-spends-her-sundays/ Alina Bloomgarden started Music on the Inside, a nonprofit that connects jazz artists with people who are incarcerated (or recently released from prisons and jails) for lessons, concerts and mentorship. His inspiration for founding the program seven years ago was Louis Armstrong, who was arrested as a child and sent to a correctional school, where […]]]>

Alina Bloomgarden started Music on the Inside, a nonprofit that connects jazz artists with people who are incarcerated (or recently released from prisons and jails) for lessons, concerts and mentorship. His inspiration for founding the program seven years ago was Louis Armstrong, who was arrested as a child and sent to a correctional school, where he learned to play the horn.

“It changed his life,” she said. “I thought to myself, what do we do now for young people and adults who go through the criminal justice system?” Ms. Bloomgarden, who was one of the founding producers of Jazz at Lincoln Center, brought in Wynton Marsalis, a former colleague and friend, as an artistic advisor for her initiative.

Since then, teaching artists like Antoinette Montague and Arturo O’Farrill have shared their skills and experiences in New York’s jails and prisons, including Rikers. With the pandemic, Music on the Inside moved online and over 200 artists signed up to volunteer. One Sunday a month, a Zoom concert brings together students and professionals; the next show, Musicians for Justice, will take place on January 16.

Ms. Bloomgarden, 77, lives on the Upper West Side.

CAFFEINE FREE When I wake up on Sunday morning, maybe around 8:30, the first thing I do is eat half an apple and some nuts. I stopped drinking coffee because I once went to the Dalai Lama’s doctor and he told me not to. The first year I quit was tough. I would go to Lincoln Center and get a cup, and this cup that I really needed. Now it’s apples and nuts.

ON GUARD Sunday mornings are all about catching up on everything I have to do, everything you normally think of when you think of nonprofit work: fundraising, writing grants. If there is a concert that evening, we will have a sound check at 1 p.m. Richard Miller, one of our excellent guitar teachers, takes care of this, but I’m on call for anything that needs to be done, so I don’t leave the apartment. The Jazz Foundation of America has been extremely important in helping us identify teacher artists like Richard. Every time he had a gig before Covid, he would get up and tell people he needed guitars for our program, and people would donate them. We also received donations of keyboards. They go directly to the correctional facilities or to the people we work with.

PARK POD In the afternoon, I take a walk in Riverside Park with my friend Roni Alpert and her dog, Flo. Flo is very attached to me. Roni and I met at Riverside Park. David Ostwald’s band played there, at the Warsaw Memorial, every day when the weather was nice during the Covid. We became a band with a few other friends. Maybe I’ll see a friend from the synagogue. I am a renewed Jew. I spent 30 years studying Buddhism, then came back to Judaism, at Romemu, a progressive organization on the Upper West Side. We could talk about what we learn with the rabbi, David Ingber.

DANCE CARD: COMPLETE Another thing I might do is try to find a dance to go to. I have always been a dancer; I was a dance student at university. Right now I’m in the ballroom and the swing. Swing 46 sometimes has a dance, or Tavern on the Green. A lot of people ask me to dance. If you’ve been in the dance business for a while, people really like to dance with you. Barry Harris, who has just died, is really the one who inspired me in jazz. I first met him through my friend Travis Peace, who used to go to Barry Harris’ Jazz Cultural Theater to study sax with him. There was something about that environment that was truly transformative.

DINNER CLUB OR SPAGHETTI If we have a concert, it’s from 6 to 7 p.m. I’ll be home for the Zoom. After that, I could go to Dizzy’s Club for dinner and more jazz. I will relax there. Otherwise, I will cook at home. Before Covid, I never ate things like pasta. For some reason I got into cooking pasta during Covid. Sometimes I will try a different recipe. One thing I tried to make recently was chicken tetrazzini. It wasn’t as good as I remembered when I first got it in college.

TIME BUT GRATEFUL I go to bed at 11 or 12 o’clock. One of the last things I do is snack on these peanut butter pretzels from Trader Joe’s. Then I wake up a lot at night because I’m going to look for ideas for the program. I am so moved by the commitment of the musicians, how they want to continue their music and help these populations. So many of our best musicians – Catherine Russell, Don Braden – have brought their music and their hearts and want to do more.

Sunday Routine readers can find out more about Alina Bloomgarden’s work on Instagram @musicontheinsideinc or on Twitter at @MOTIinc.

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Milestone Partners sells Heights Finance https://iridiumjazz.com/milestone-partners-sells-heights-finance/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 17:46:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/milestone-partners-sells-heights-finance/ RADNOR, Pa., January 13, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Milestone Partners (“Milestone”) is pleased to announce the sale of Heights Finance (“Heights” or the “Company”) to CURO Group Holdings Corp. (NYSE: CURO), the December 27, 2021 for a total equity consideration of $360 million. Based at Greenville, South Carolina, Heights provides installment loans and related insurance products […]]]>

RADNOR, Pa., January 13, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Milestone Partners (“Milestone”) is pleased to announce the sale of Heights Finance (“Heights” or the “Company”) to CURO Group Holdings Corp. (NYSE: CURO), the December 27, 2021 for a total equity consideration of $360 million.

Based at Greenville, South Carolina, Heights provides installment loans and related insurance products primarily to underbanked consumers with limited access to credit from banks and other financial institutions. Founded in 1953, the company has more than 1,300 employees and 400 branches in eleven states spanning the South and Midwest United States.

Milestone originally invested in Heights, f/k/a Southern Management Corporation (“SMC”), in June 2012. The company was renamed in the second quarter of 2021 following the acquisition of Heights by SMC in december 2019. During Milestone’s ownership period, the company has implemented numerous growth initiatives, including the transformative add-on acquisition and subsequent rebranding to Heights, substantial branch technology upgrades and construction of a proprietary data warehouse, further enhancing its underwriting capabilities. During Milestone’s ownership, Heights diversified its product line, doubled its footprint and tripled its profits.

Heights (www.heightsfinance.com) is a leading provider of consumer installment loans through more than 400 branches in the South and Midwest United States. The Company also provides credit insurance linked to installment loans and ancillary products to customers who do not have access to traditional banking and insurance products. Heights operates in eleven states – Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Oklahoma, Caroline from the south, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin.

Stage partners (www.milestonepartners.com) is a private equity firm that partners with management to invest in leveraged buyouts and recapitalizations of middle market companies. Based in the suburbs philadelphia cream, Milestone Partners has completed more than 100 acquisitions, additions and sales transactions since 1995, while managing nearly $1 billion committed equity.

Within financial services, Milestone invests in niche, high-margin companies in insurance, specialty finance, fintech and asset management. Transaction targets typically have income of $ 20$ 500 million and EBITDA / profit before tax of $ 10$ 100 million.

SOURCE Stage Partners

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Jazz album review: “Louise” by Emile Parisien Sextet – Deeply lyrical, disciplined and free https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-album-review-louise-by-emile-parisien-sextet-deeply-lyrical-disciplined-and-free/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 23:24:24 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-album-review-louise-by-emile-parisien-sextet-deeply-lyrical-disciplined-and-free/ By Michael Ullman The new record by soprano saxophonist Emile Parisien is intentionally, and satisfactorily, international. Emile Parisien Sextet, Louise (ACT) The only time I saw French soprano saxophonist Emile Parisien, he was playing a duet with accordionist Vincent Peirani. They couldn’t have sounded more French, or what I heard in French. They were playing […]]]>

By Michael Ullman

The new record by soprano saxophonist Emile Parisien is intentionally, and satisfactorily, international.

Emile Parisien Sextet, Louise (ACT)

The only time I saw French soprano saxophonist Emile Parisien, he was playing a duet with accordionist Vincent Peirani. They couldn’t have sounded more French, or what I heard in French. They were playing a kind of hip Gallic folk music closer to Django Reinhardt’s heritage than to that of Charlie Parker. (It helped that they were in Montreal.) But Louise, The Parisian’s new record is intentionally, and satisfactorily, international. It stars three Americans: trumpeter Theo Croker, bassist Joe Martin and drummer Nasheet Waits. (Croker is the grandson of legendary trumpeter Doc Cheatham and Waits the son of another esteemed musician, drummer Freddie Waits.) Parisian and guitarist Manu Codjia are French while pianist Roberto Negro, now Parisian, was born in Turin, raised in Kinshasa, and studied in Chambéry before settling in Paris. Parisien wrote six of the album’s numbers; Among the exceptions is “Jungle Jig” by Manu Codjia, a raucous piece whose boppish lines frame the group improvisations energized by the drums playing of Nasheet Waits.

The session begins solemnly with a deep note in the bass of the piano taken up by the trumpet. This is the title cut, “Louise, which is dedicated to the sculptor Louise Bourgeois, whose creations of spiders, large and small, made her famous all over the world. There is nothing spooky about this mostly dark composition. We can hear the guitar a little, but the background remains almost motionless as Parisien utters his written melody: everything seems to float serenely in this introduction, whether it is played by the saxophone or when Croker takes it. on. Then the rhythm section kicks in and the two horns together play the spellbinding main melody. The improvisations that follow, by Croker and guitarist Codjia, maintain the unperturbed lyricism of the overture, except that there is a characteristic Parisian ending: the horns begin to repeat part of the theme with increasing intensity until that the part expires. He likes to finish things suddenly.

2018 recording of Theo Croker Star People Nation has been widely praised, and for good reason. His playing as a sideman here is also to be praised for his beautiful tone and for what I will call his tact, his ability to always make the right move. This is the sensitivity I hear in his subtle entry behind the Parisian solo on Joe Zawinul’s “Madagascar”, ” which was first recorded on Weather Report’s Night passage. The Parisian is a fervent admirer of Zawinul. In 2008, the saxophonist performed in a group called Syndicate, which was designed to preserve the legacy of the Austrian pianist, who died in Vienna in 2007. On their version of “Madagascar, ” the careful interweaving of verses from Parisien and Croker works well in the improvised introduction, with Croker, at one point, almost spitting out a low note. Then the piece gains strength and the familiar melody emerges. The fastest and craziest piece here is the Parisian’s neo-Boppish line in “Jojo,” which is dedicated to German pianist Joachim Kühn. Parisien plays a solo of attractive fury and he remains an eloquent voice throughout. At one point, Croker suddenly takes the piece out of beat. The contrast is striking – and the gradual return of the original tempo is thrilling. Probably best known for his work on Don Cherry’s Eternal rhythm, and for his New York Impressions (on Impluse), Kühn, now 77, undoubtedly salutes such a beautiful tribute.

Emile Parisien & group. (from left to right) Manu Codija (guitar), Theo Crocker (trumpet), Joe Martin (bass), Roberto Negro (piano), Emile Parisien (soprano saxophone), Nasheet Waits (drums). Photo: Samuel Kirszenbaum.

The writing of the Parisian is often melancholy, as in the melody of the first of the three parts of “Memento”, dedicated to the saxophonist’s mother. The first sounds we hear are sharp metallic bangs, I guess, from the pianist. Then Waits enters on brushes and with moderate cymbal strikes with Parisien playing his softly drooping melody. It’s a haunting piece, simple in design and yet it offers what seems to be a striking feature of Parisian writing – an intensity of coming together. The tune opens when guitarist Codjia does a solo. The second part of “Momento” first presents the negro’s solo piano. His memory is cheerful… Negro almost stops right before Waits walks in with a wacky beat and the band makes all kinds of squeaks, bangs, bumps and squeaks around him before the written melody emerges. Part III is more fervent, with an obsessively repeated chord. Croker growls threateningly – he interrupts her with a few written bars. It’s a dark sounding song. The record ends, however, with the swollen phrases from Croker’s softly meditative song “Prayer 4 Peace.”. “ Parisien and Croker sound like they were meant to play together. At Louise, the saxophonist has assembled a superb group that is both disciplined and free – and dedicated to preserving the composer’s deeply lyrical sound.


Michael ullman studied classical clarinet and was educated at Harvard, University of Chicago, and University of Michigan, from which he earned a doctorate in English. Author or co-author of two books on jazz, he has written on jazz and classical music for the Atlantic monthly, New Republic, High fidelity, Stereophile, Boston phoenix, Boston Globe, and other places. His articles on Dickens, Joyce, Kipling and others have appeared in academic journals. For more than 20 years, he has written a bimonthly jazz column for Fanfare Magazine, for which he also criticizes classical music. At Tufts University, he mainly teaches modernist writers in the English department and the history of jazz and blues in the music department. He does not play the piano well.

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Ethan Iverson, GoGo Penguin, Duke Ellington and more: Jazz week https://iridiumjazz.com/ethan-iverson-gogo-penguin-duke-ellington-and-more-jazz-week/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 18:03:50 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/ethan-iverson-gogo-penguin-duke-ellington-and-more-jazz-week/ The Week in Jazz is your roundup of new and remarkable stories from the world of jazz. It’s a one-stop destination for the music news you need to know. Take it from the top. Remarkable Ronnie Scott Amnesty 2022 musical instrument: London’s famous jazz venue Ronnie Scott’s will hold a musical instrument amnesty day, bringing […]]]>

The Week in Jazz is your roundup of new and remarkable stories from the world of jazz. It’s a one-stop destination for the music news you need to know. Take it from the top.

Remarkable

Ronnie Scott Amnesty 2022 musical instrument: London’s famous jazz venue Ronnie Scott’s will hold a musical instrument amnesty day, bringing together unused or broken musical instruments on January 22. All instruments will be donated to school-aged children in the UK and abroad to enable music education among communities around the world. . The doors will be open for collection between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. More here.

Launch of the new Jazz Play-Along application: London-based UK Music Apps Ltd. recently launched a brand new app called Jazz300 for iPad and iPhone. The app offers musicians of all skill levels to play with a collection of 300 jazz standard backing tracks with the ability to change keys and tempo. The backing tracks were recorded by Kirk Whalum, Chris Standring and Jason Rebello. Download the app here.

Rob Turner leaves GoGo Penguin: Drummer Rob Turner has announced his release from GoGo Penguin, the left-wing jazz piano trio from Manchester, England, which he co-founded, due to creative differences. He will be replaced by drummer Jon Scott. Turner took to social media to discuss his recent departure from the group, including a video uploaded to his new YouTube account earlier this month which you can watch through the player below.

Jazz North appoints a new general manager: Jazz North, the jazz development agency for the north of England, has announced the appointment of Chris Bye as Managing Director. He will be responsible for leading the next phase of Jazz North’s development, expanding opportunities for artists, audiences, promoters and young people in the region. “Artists are looking for opportunities and my goal is to diversify our approach and expand our partnership,” Bye said via an official statement. “I am extremely excited to join and look forward to working with an amazing group of people. “

Album announcements

The OGJB Quartet, Ode to O (TUM): The OGJB quartet with saxophonist Oliver Lake, Graham Hayes on cornet and electronics, bassist Joe Fonda and drummer Barry Altschul draw inspiration from various influences on Ode to O, which will be released on January 21 via TUM Records. The album finds every member of the group contributing to the compositions of the new recording, including Altschul’s title composition dedicated to the late great Ornette Coleman, and collective improvisations. “On this recording, we did everything possible,” says Fonda via a press release. Pre-order Ode to O here.

Ethan Iverson, Every note is true (Blue Note): On February 11, pianist / composer Ethan Iverson delves into his own musical history by revisiting the jazz style with pop / rock accents of his influential trio, The Bad Plus, on his new album. The music of his debut Blue Note, Every note is true, is performed in a stellar trio with bassist Larry Grenadier and legendary drummer Jack DeJohnette. Pre-order Every note is true here.

Oscar Hernández & Alma Libre, Vision (Ovation): Pianist / composer / conductor Oscar Hernández, also known as the leader and producer of the Spanish Harlem Orchestra, is set to release a new album with his longtime quintet Alma Libre on January 22 via his new label Ovation Records. Vision will present ten new original compositions that reaffirm her position as one of the most important voices in Latin music and will feature special guests including Joe Locke, Aaron Janik and Luisito Quintero.

Mathis Picard, Living at the museum (Outside in): Pianist Mathis Picard will release a new solo piano disc, Living at the museum, January 28 via Outside in Music. The album was recorded live at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem and is a personal sonic journey through which Picard honors his roots in jazz, classical and electronic music. Pre-order it here.

Live music and festival news

Igor Levit will present Fred Hersch’s new composition at Carnegie Hall: A new piece by Fred Hersch, “Variations on a Folk Song,” will premiere in a performance by pianist Igor Levit on January 13 at Carnegie Hall in New York City. The composition will be part of a program of solo performances including music by Beethoven, Wagner and Liszt. Tickets here.

Photo credit: Robbie Lawrence

First drop of Blue Note New York NFT: Blue Note New York has released a 40 year anniversary NFT in partnership with YellowHeart. Each NFT unlocks a reserved VIP seat ticket for select Blue Note shows that run through January 23, 2022. This will be Blue Note New York’s first NFT drop, making it one of the premier entertainment venues in the world. New York City to adopt blockchain technology. Tickets here.

Dr Phillips Center Presents Ellington’s World Premiere: The Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts in Orlando, Fla. To present the professional premiere of Randall Keith Horton’s new orchestral arrangement of Duke Ellington Black, Brown & Beige as part of the opening celebration of its new Steinmetz Hall. The arrangement will be performed by Audra McDonald, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra of London, the Jazz Orchestra of the Dr. Phillips Center, musicians from the Jazz at Lincoln Center and the Bethune-Cookman University Concert Choir. The overnight event takes place on January 26 and will also include a performance of Ellington Sacred music. Tickets here.

Joey DeFrancesco Spring 2022 Tour: Joey DeFrancesco has announced his US Spring 2022 tour dates in support of his latest album, More Music, available now on Mack Avenue. Check out all the upcoming dates here. More Music finds DeFrancesco showing off his chops on a variety of instruments, including the first-time tenor saxophone. Order it here.

Featured photo by Keith Major.

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Keywords:
Alma Libre, Blue Note, Chris Standring, Duke Ellington, Ethan Iverson, Fred Hersch, GoGo Penguin, Igor Levit, Jason Rebello, Jazz North, Joey DeFrancesco, Kirk Whalum, Mathis Picard, Oscar Hernández, Rob Turner, Ronnie Scott’s, L ‘ OGJB Quartet


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Sandra Jaffe, who helped preserve jazz at Preservation Hall, dies at 83 https://iridiumjazz.com/sandra-jaffe-who-helped-preserve-jazz-at-preservation-hall-dies-at-83/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 23:35:32 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/sandra-jaffe-who-helped-preserve-jazz-at-preservation-hall-dies-at-83/ In 1961, Sandra and Allan Jaffe stopped by New Orleans on their way back to Philadelphia after a long honeymoon in Mexico. They heard music all around them in the French Quarter and walked into an art gallery on St. Peter’s Street where a combo was playing traditional jazz. The Jaffes, then in their twenties, […]]]>

In 1961, Sandra and Allan Jaffe stopped by New Orleans on their way back to Philadelphia after a long honeymoon in Mexico. They heard music all around them in the French Quarter and walked into an art gallery on St. Peter’s Street where a combo was playing traditional jazz.

The Jaffes, then in their twenties, were transformed by what they heard. They returned a few days later to hear the combo again. Gallery owner Larry Borenstein told them he was moving his business next door and offered to rent the modest space (31 by 20 feet) to the couple for $ 400 a month.

“We haven’t even thought twice about it,” Ms. Jaffe told Alumni magazine of Harcum College, from which she graduated, in 2011. “Of course,” we said, and it was. the start of Preservation Hall. We never left New Orleans.

Conservation room – which does not serve alcohol, has no air conditioning and can accommodate around fifty seats on six benches – has celebrated jazz for 60 years in a city widely considered to be its birthplace. He defied segregation laws in the early 1960s. He survived Mr. Jaffe’s death in 1987 and Hurricane Katrina. The coronavirus pandemic shut it down, but it triumphantly reopened in June.

And he trained musicians, some of whom played with Louis Armstrong (such as the guitarist Johnny Saint-Cyr) and even (like the bassist Papa John Joseph) with the cornet player daring buddy, said by many jazz historians to have been the first significant practitioner of music. Many of them had been largely forgotten amid the growing dominance of rock ‘n’ roll and other more modern forms of music.

“There is no doubt that Preservation Hall saved New Orleans jazz”, George Wein, the impresario who produced the Newport Jazz Festival and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, says Vanity Fair in 2011. “When it became an institution in New Orleans, everyone who went went into the room. They paid a dollar to hear from people like George Lewis or Sweet Emma Barrett and made them national figures. “

Ms Jaffe died in a New Orleans hospital on Monday. She was 83 years old.

His son Ben, the creative director of Preservation Hall, has confirmed the death.

The Jaffes played different roles at Preservation Hall. Allan Jaffe, who played the helicon, a brass instrument, was the link with the musicians and sent them on the road as the Preservation Hall Jazz Band. Ms Jaffe, who shared management duties with her husband, was usually stationed at the front door of the room, a basket in her lap, collecting money from customers.

“This is how many remember her: as the first to interact with people,” Ben Jaffe said in an interview. “She was also the de facto bouncer and security; she had to intervene when people were inappropriate or adopted racist language. My mother would bite first, then assess the situation.

Preservation Hall was incorporated at a time when there were still Jim Crow laws that prohibited the mixing of races. Ms. Jaffe has already been arrested there, along with Kid Thomas Valentine’s gang, for flouting the ban on integration.

“The judge hit with his hammer and said, ‘In New Orleans, we don’t like to mix our coffee and our cream,’ said Ben Jaffe, recalling what his parents told him. She burst out laughing and said, ‘Funny, the most popular thing in New Orleans is latte. “”

Sandra Smolen was born in Philadelphia on March 10, 1938. Her parents were Jewish immigrants from Ukraine. Her father, Jacob, held a variety of jobs, including running a gas station and bar; her mother, Lena (Kaplan) Smolen, was a housewife.

Sandra studied journalism and public relations at Harcum, Bryn Mawr., Pa., And graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 1958. She worked for an advertising agency for two years and married her husband on Christmas Day 1960. Afterwards on a honeymoon in Mexico, they headed to New Orleans, where one of his fraternity brothers lived; Mr. Jaffe had come to know the city during his military service.

After their first musical encounter at the art gallery, the Jaffes decided they would stay three more days, until the combo that had fascinated them reappeared.

“Our parents were waiting for us every day in Philadelphia,” she told Harcum magazine, “but we had to stay a little longer.”

After concluding the rental agreement for the gallery, the Jaffes joined other fans of their jam sessions to form the New Orleans Society for the Preservation of Traditional Jazz to reserve musicians; a few months later, the couple opens the room. For the first year or so, they kept the jobs they found in New Orleans, Ms. Jaffe at a typesetting company and Mr. Jaffe at a department store.

They didn’t charge for admission at the start. Instead, customers deposited money into a basket that Ms. Jaffe passed around; she would shake it if anyone seemed unwilling to contribute. Eventually they started charging $ 1 (today tickets cost $ 25- $ 50).

Business was propelled from the start with a two-and-a-half-minute glowing article on Preservation Hall – which featured Mr Jaffe but not Ms Jaffe – on the “Huntley-Brinkley Report.

Mr. Jaffe began sending musicians on tour in 1963, and various versions of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band have performed around the world and recorded since. Band members included Sweet pianist Emma Barrett, brothers Willie and Percy Humphrey (who played clarinet and trumpet) and husband and wife Billie and De De Pierce (she played piano and sang, he played the trumpet and the cornet). Ben Jaffe is currently playing sousaphone in the group.

“I took the band on tour for many years,” said Resa Lambert, one of Ms. Jaffe’s sisters, who worked at the Hall for many years, in an interview. “I was a roadie. For seven men. It was great.”

In addition to her son Ben and sister, Mrs. Jaffe is survived by another son, Russell; four grandchildren; and another sister, Brenda Epstein.

The Preservation Hall Jazz Band received the National Medal of the Arts by President George W. Bush in 2006. The ensemble was cited for “demonstrating the unwavering spirit of New Orleans and sharing the joy of New Orleans jazz with all of us.”

Ms Jaffe, who accepted the award with her son Ben, remained involved in the room until recently, although she no longer had a practical role.

“She was calling every day to ask about ticket sales and tours,” said Ben Jaffe. “She always felt engaged and was always engaged, even when she wasn’t physically there.” Until recently, he said, she would grab a broom and sweep the sidewalk in front.


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Bonnie’s books… and all that jazz | News, Sports, Jobs https://iridiumjazz.com/bonnies-books-and-all-that-jazz-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 06:33:45 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/bonnies-books-and-all-that-jazz-news-sports-jobs/ Former Wintersville resident Bonnie Harvey DiDomenico was an avid reader who donated her collection of 675 books to the Steubenville and Jefferson County Public Library. DiDomenico donated them to the Wintersville Woman’s Club of which she was a member, which in turn donated them to the library system as a community service project. The donation […]]]>

Former Wintersville resident Bonnie Harvey DiDomenico was an avid reader who donated her collection of 675 books to the Steubenville and Jefferson County Public Library. DiDomenico donated them to the Wintersville Woman’s Club of which she was a member, which in turn donated them to the library system as a community service project. The donation included 545 jazz CDs that belonged to his mother, the late Dorothy Jean Harvey. – Contributed

STEUBENVILLE – The Steubenville and Jefferson County Public Library occasionally receives donations of books and items, but a recent one of quantity and quality made on behalf of the GFWC / OFWC Wintersville Woman’s Club is far from a fiction, not to mention a Christmas gift of sorts with year round appeals for appreciation.

The gift took a lot of travel and some physical commitment to bring from point A to point B the collection of 675 books belonging to former Wintersville resident Bonnie Harvey DiDomenico.

The 640 hardback books and 35 paperback books finally found a new place in the local library system.

And they came with a bonus, this one for listening pleasure, not reading. The library became the new owner of a collection of jazz CDs totaling 545 items, those previously owned by DiDomenico’s mother, the late Dorothy Jean Harvey.

Details of how this happened were shared by Suzy Crawford, a friend and club member of the former area resident who moved to Virginia to be with her family. Crawford had helped clean DiDomenico’s house.

“Bonnie and I discussed the books in May when I started cleaning the house, and she and I thought it would be a good women’s club project, so she donated them to the club to donate to the library.” “ explained Crawford, who had a “Wow” reaction from Mike Gray, director of the library, when they saw the extent of the collection.

Although Crawford was surprised at the number of books that had piled up, it was no secret that DiDomenico enjoyed reading.

“Bonnie was an avid reader and always had a book with her wherever she went” Crawford said. “His motto was ‘You never know when you have free time when you’re out, so take a book with you.'”

Which she did, according to Crawford, who said DiDomenico, who died on December 19, would average two to three pounds a week.

“If Bonnie was going to Wendy’s, she would grab her tray, sit down, open the book, then take a bite to eat. Any local restaurant where she would eat would know her because she was there with her book. She was never without a bag with a book in it ”, Crawford said, describing the collection as “An important and generous donation”.

A graduate of Wintersville High School in 1969, DiDomenico lived in the countryside on Powells Lane in Wintersville with his parents, the late Emmett Lee and Dorothy Jean Harvey, as well as his older sister Barbara and his brother Bob. “She has spent a lot of hours riding her horse Smokey. Barbara called her Annie Oakley ”, Crawford said, adding that DiDomenico, like his father, was “A shot with a gun”.

In his youth, DiDomenico lived in New Jersey and worked as a flight attendant for TWA in New York. Upon her return to Wintersville, she worked for Dr. Ronald Agresta and later became a public relations representative for an industrial safety equipment company. In this capacity, she has traveled extensively in the United States and abroad. When she retired from Uvex, DiDomenico had received numerous awards for her leadership accomplishments, which did not surprise her brother.

“When Bonnie had a job, she gave 110% in everything she did” he said.

DiDomenico’s return to the area brought the discovery that his circle of friends had left the area, according to Crawford, who had graduated from Wintersville High School in 1963 with DiDomenico’s sister. A group from the class of 1963 had formed the YaYa Sisterhood, which has met monthly for almost 35 years.

“We adopted her even though she was the little sister” Crawford said when explaining how she came to know DiDomenico better.

“She was the life of the party, and she and Barbara could have done stand-up. They kept everyone in stitches ”, Crawford said, adding that the group appreciated him “invaluable” knowledge book that kept the group informed on all kinds of problem solving. “If you mentioned that you had a problem with an insect or a plant, Bonnie had read about it”, Crawford said. “She always gave us these little tips. You raised a subject, and Bonnie had knowledge of it.

DiDomenico was active in the Wintersville Woman’s Club of which his sister, the late Barbara Thermes, had been president. DiDomenico has served on various club committees and most recently was correspondent secretary before moving due to health concerns. She lives in Suffolk, Virginia, now with her daughter and son-in-law, Aymee and Ryan Siléritéorn, and grandsons Asher and Benny.

“She started coming to YaYa, then she joined the women’s club, and we quickly became friends,” she said. Crawford explained how the friendship blossomed. “When she needed the house to be taken care of, I went out and my son helped me” Crawford said, stressing that DiDomenico wanted things that could be donated to be put to good use.

“It was his mother’s jazz,” Crawford said. “Her mother would sit in a rocking chair at night, listening to jazz.”

DiDomenico was an active member of the First Westminster Presbyterian Church in Steubenville, where she served as a church elder, a church session member, a member of the worship and music committee, and the congregation care committee. , serving dinners to grieving families. She also participated in the Presbyterian Women’s Bible Study and Mission Group.

She was also an avid ornithologist and gardener, proud of her weed-free garden, according to Crawford.

“She would deliver produce to the pens and on Sunday mornings would open her trunk at church and ask the members to help themselves. She was also known to deliver meals to prisoners, and when her sister Barb and her brother-in-law Gil Thermes were very ill before they died, meals were eaten regularly ”, she said.

“Mike was delighted with the quality of the books and overwhelmed with the sheer quantity of books when he had to make four trips to get them all here.” Crawford said.

“I freaked out the first time I saw them” she added.

The club’s donation of the Gifted Book and Jazz CD collection falls under the Community Service Education and Library Program committees chaired by Mary Ann Parker. “It will bring a lot of smiles to jazz lovers and readers” Parker said.

Gray explained the protocol of what happens when donations are made to the library.

“We usually do some sort of ‘triage’ of donations, often in the garage of the main library. “ he said. “The categories are: books to add to the collection, books to keep for the Friends of the library book sale, books for the Free-to-good-home shelf, and recycling materials.” Materials to be added are set aside and processed (plastic sheet cover, barcode, label on the back) when time is available, usually by volunteer Alan Hall ”, he said of the now retired library manager. “Many older books are replacing beloved copies on our shelves. “

The vast majority of DiDomenico’s books are mysteries and thrillers, many titles by James Patterson and Michael Connally, but there are also history and gardening books in the mix.

“Jazz CDs focused on singers, jazz piano, and little combos, old and new. “ Gray commented. “I asked Erika Grubbs, our local history librarian, to select which ones to add to our collection. She is very passionate about jazz.

DiDomenico’s donation ranks in the top five for the amount given to the library over the years, according to Gray.

“These types of donations are becoming more and more frequent as we move forward in the COVID-19 period”, he said. “A lot of people spent their time in confinement cleaning their homes and pulled out books. Here at the library, we are happy to receive donations of this type, and we are working hard to use as many donations as possible. “

With this school of thought in session, Gray offers a suggestion.

“If there’s one thing I’d like to impress about readers who buy books, don’t let the book sit on your shelf if you’re done reading it. “ he said. “As Marie Kondo says, if it doesn’t bring you joy, donate it” he said, referring to the renowned author and storage expert who starred in a Netflix show called “Cleaning up with Marie Kondo. “

“We have a great patron at our Dillonvale branch library, and he buys a new book, reads it, and donates it. “ Gray said. “Sometimes his book is processed and put on the shelves before the copy we buy is released. Share your literary riches with everyone while the book is fresh – you will feel better ”, Gray added.

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Daniele Germani: what reason could I give https://iridiumjazz.com/daniele-germani-what-reason-could-i-give/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 15:21:20 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/daniele-germani-what-reason-could-i-give/ Based in New York City, Daniele Germani learned the saxophone at age 11 and by age 20 he played jazz in Rome, Paris, Amsterdam and Brussels, then studied at the Frosinone Conservatory in Italy and the Berklee College of Music in Boston. Since then he has performed in clubs and festivals in Europe, South America […]]]>

Based in New York City, Daniele Germani learned the saxophone at age 11 and by age 20 he played jazz in Rome, Paris, Amsterdam and Brussels, then studied at the Frosinone Conservatory in Italy and the Berklee College of Music in Boston.

Since then he has performed in clubs and festivals in Europe, South America and the United States with artists such as Dave Douglas Octet, Leo Genovese, Dave Douglas, Bob Moses and George Garzone, as well as his own quartet and that of Cosimo Boni; 2021 saw the release of two albums on Gleam Records (A Congregation Of People and Xenya).

Released by Cicaleto Recording in Italy and featuring Paris-based American bassist Joe Sanders, this third offering includes 12 tracks, four featuring the Ornette Coleman tune from the record’s title, the other eight being composed by Germani.

Anything But A Screen opens the set with an interplay of strong, established chords from Italian pianist Domenico Sanna and lazy, playful Germani saxophone over challenging drum action. As Long As You Accept Me also features a dark piano and sax, with the leader’s longtime collaborator Cosimo Boni energetically joining on the trumpet, while Sanders and drummer Francesco Ciniglio (Italian, but also Parisian) are busy to the rhythm.

Parallels boasts of beautiful, very lonely hornwork, and the Germani-Sanders Origin co-writing kicks off on a lively percussive passage, with twin horns paired to lively drum rolls, submerged and punctuated basslines and a cascade piano. Meanwhile, the bouncy and mixed Heavy Lights give way to a low-key scat vocals preceding cacophonous horn work.

Germani’s writing and arranging is on the money for sure, but the most interesting entries are the four very different but concise takes (the longest sets at 1.59) on What Reason Could I Give For Coleman. The former is a slow, plaintive reflection via piano and saxophone, while the latter takes up a rumba tempo with many curved bass notes, and Version III features extensive underlying trumpet passages with saxophone closure. and battery on top. Finally, What Reason Could I Give IV sees bass and saxophone hesitantly bounce off each other before closing to a high, shiny horn. These would make a fabulous EP.

This is a solid set, mixing originals and covers (or versions of a reprise), delivered by virtuoso players who excel at slipping into individual interludes of exploration and improvisation while coming together to function as a tight and cohesive musical unit.

Discography
Everything except a screen; As long as you accept me; parallels; What reason could I give? Origin; On the canvas you made; What reason could I give II; The vision we have of things we don’t know; Heavy lights; What reason could I give III; Which could also be a name; What reason could I give IV (42,59)
Germani (as); Cosimo Boni


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Jazz legend Don Palmer, who mentored generations of Nova Scotia musicians, dies at 82 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-legend-don-palmer-who-mentored-generations-of-nova-scotia-musicians-dies-at-82/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 20:54:03 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-legend-don-palmer-who-mentored-generations-of-nova-scotia-musicians-dies-at-82/ Don Palmer, a Canadian jazz legend who inspired and mentored generations of musicians in Nova Scotia, has passed away. He was 82 years old. Palmer, who was born in Sydney, died in a Toronto hospital on Friday after a brief illness. Saxophonist and flautist by trade, Palmer was known for his jazz trio Alive with […]]]>

Don Palmer, a Canadian jazz legend who inspired and mentored generations of musicians in Nova Scotia, has passed away. He was 82 years old.

Palmer, who was born in Sydney, died in a Toronto hospital on Friday after a brief illness.

Saxophonist and flautist by trade, Palmer was known for his jazz trio Alive with Jerry Granelli and Skip Beckwith and his work with Latin jazz musician Tito Puente, among countless other artists, groups and orchestras over the years.

Although he has enjoyed success in the industry, Palmer’s daughter, Leanna Palmer, said he was best known for being a generous and kind teacher.

Don Palmer, left, and Jerry Granelli, right, were part of the jazz trio Alive and Well with Skip Beckwith. Granelli passed away earlier this year. (Submitted by Jeff Reilly)

“He lived every day of his life with love, with everything. It was the love of music. It was the love of his students. It was the love of life,” Leanna has said since. his home in Toronto.

“… When you hear people talk about his impact – of course his music is important – but he had such an impact on his students as people, because he just wanted to share that love of music, but he also just wanted to cultivate this love in others. “

As a young man, Palmer played the clarinet in the Royal Canadian Artillery Band in Halifax, attended the Maritime Conservatory of Performing Arts, and often played the alto saxophone at a jazz club on Barrington Street.

His love of jazz brought him to New York in 1956, when legends like John Coltrane and Miles Davis were playing, and during his time there he studied with several renowned musicians, including Lennie Tristano and Lee konitz.

“He kind of absorbed it all and it came out in his game,” said Jeff Reilly, CBC music producer and longtime friend of Palmer’s. “He was totally committed to music.”

Reilly said Palmer’s style was influenced by his teachers’ fast, light and energetic playing, but he made it his own – more distinct and rhythmically aggressive.

Palmer studied in New York. (Submitted by Leanna Palmer)

He added that Palmer had an impressive ability to lead a loosely paced quartet and turn music into something cohesive “just by the force of his own rhythmic integrity.”

Contribute to Agitation

Both Reilly and Leanna have said that one of the most popular pieces Palmer has contributed to was Van McKoy’s. 1970s disco hit The restlessness.

Palmer was a multi-instrumentalist working as a freelance studio musician at the time, and during a recording session he was asked to play a line on his flute.

Little did he know that a line would become the song’s signature flute beat.

“He was embarrassed about it at first. It was just a gig, right? He didn’t know what it was like when he walked in.

Palmer spent more than two decades in New York City before returning to Sydney. (Submitted by Leanna Palmer)

“He played this very simple, very small little tune over and over again, got his paycheck and went home and then found out it was a pretty famous song,” Leanna said with a laugh.

Leanna said her father had even been a member of Broadway bands for musicals, including Fat, during his stay in New York.

“Don to really listen”

After spending two decades in New York City, Palmer returned to Sydney to serve as Artist in Residence at the College of Cape Breton, bringing a wealth of musical knowledge he was destined to share.

Soon after, in the late 1970s, he co-founded the Atlantic Jazz Festival – now the Halifax Jazz Festival – and later became its artistic director.

He also became Director of Jazz Studies at Dalhousie University, where he taught generations of students, growing the jazz scene in Halifax.

Paul White, a music producer in Toronto and friend of Palmer’s, said he first met Palmer while playing at a jazz festival in Dartmouth as a teenager.

Palmer was a guest referee and rated the tapes.

“I distinctly remember him judging that day and said, ‘I’m going to study with him. I mean, I more or less went to Dalhousie, just to be with him, ”White said.

“He was my mentor and I am fortunate that he has become such a good friend to me.”

Reilly said he had a similar experience with Palmer, even as a fellow musician.

“Don had such a wealth of experience in the late ’80s that he was really as much of a mentor as a colleague, but he never treated me that way,” Reilly said.

“[He taught] just by example and telling me endless stories about his experiences in New York and somehow imbibing an understanding of the heritage of jazz. “

Palmer became the director of the jazz program at Dalhousie University in the late 1970s. It was there that he became a mentor to many musicians in Nova Scotia. (Submitted by Leanna Palmer)

Reilly said Palmer instilled this legacy in every student he taught, including Juno Prize winners. saxophonist, Kirk MacDonald, the current director of the jazz program at Dalhousie, Chris Mitchell, and Mike Murley, who is considered one of Canada’s most famous jazz artists.

“He genuinely cared about other people and their musical development and listened intently to you as a player… he would give this gift of really listening to what you were doing and [was] able to recognize your strengths and somehow give you an idea of ​​how to overcome your weaknesses without making you feel diminished.

“He’s a real gift. He was a great teacher and that legacy lives on with so many players,” said Reilly.

White said this legacy, and Palmer himself, will never be forgotten.

Palmer’s daughter, Leanna Palmer, said her father’s legacy lives on in the love he shared with his family and the many students he has worked with over the years. (Submitted by Leanna Palmer)

Leanna said that her father will be sadly missed.

“Her heritage is more than her music,” she said.

“Yes his music is so important and it is important to him and it is important to many, but I think the person we miss right now is the man, not the music.”


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KC Jazz Ambassadors to present first-ever JAM Musician Awards on December 14 https://iridiumjazz.com/kc-jazz-ambassadors-to-present-first-ever-jam-musician-awards-on-december-14/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 22:04:05 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/kc-jazz-ambassadors-to-present-first-ever-jam-musician-awards-on-december-14/ Marc Edelman, President of KC Jazz Ambassadors. // Courtesy of KC Jazz Ambassadors On Tuesday, December 14, the KC Jazz Ambassadors will present the first-ever JAM Musician Awards at Johnnie’s Jazz Club. The purpose of the event is to recognize “everyone’s favorite jazz musicians in Kansas City,” said David Basse, editor of JAM magazine. Since […]]]>

Marc Edelman, President of KC Jazz Ambassadors. // Courtesy of KC Jazz Ambassadors

On Tuesday, December 14, the KC Jazz Ambassadors will present the first-ever JAM Musician Awards at Johnnie’s Jazz Club. The purpose of the event is to recognize “everyone’s favorite jazz musicians in Kansas City,” said David Basse, editor of JAM magazine.

Since the KC Jazz Ambassadors have been around since 1984, I contacted the president of the organization, Marc Edelman, to find out what the impetus for these first awards was.

As the pandemic began to subside and KC’s jazz musicians slowly got back to work, they tried to think of something to involve the audience with them, Edelman explains in an email.

“We contributed over $ 17,000 through ‘Gig Grants’ to our local jazz musicians, but it was right between the jazz ambassadors and the musicians,” writes the president. “We wanted to give as many people as possible the opportunity to say, ‘Welcome, we missed you. So the idea was born to name your favorite jazz musicians, then choose one of the nominees in each category.

This, in addition to having a big party for musicians and jazz ambassadors, of course. In addition to the awards ceremony, there is an opening set by the UMKC Conservatory Jazz Ensemble and a jam session afterwards with some of the nominees and participants.

Since KC has a deep jazz heritage, I ask Edelman where he sees it now, and the Chairman of Jazz Ambassadors isn’t holding back.

“I’m always irritated when I see Kansas City omitted a list of jazz cities,” writes Edelman. “Did I say ‘irritated’? I mean “pissed off”. Go to Denver, St Louis, Minneapolis, Dallas, Houston, San Fran, Seattle – even Chicago if you subtract the blues bars – none of them have live music coming out of ten clubs on a given Thursday or Friday night. .

He then lists the thriving clubs in Kansas City, naming Blue Room, Phoenix, Corvino, Soiree, Black Dolphin, Green Lady, the Majestic, Lonnie’s Reno Club, Cafe Trio, Eddie V’s, Chaz on the Plaza, the Intercontinental and Johnnie’s Jazz. Club downtown.

“It’s been thirteen years and that counts! Edelman raves. “Easy to get to, free parking, good players, low blankets. Other than New York City, where blankets start at $ 25 and parking double, it’s hard to beat.

Bass Vog

David Bass. // Courtesy of KC Jazz Ambassadors

The awards were voted on through an online portal, with 670 local jazz fans choosing from the top four nominees in categories spanning everything: jazz guitarist, vocalist, saxophonists and trumpeters, pianists, jazz clubs, concert halls and radio broadcasts.

“We had around 500 nomination forms, from which we selected the top four voters in each category to create the final ballot,” continues Edelman. “Herschel McWilliams, a member of our board of directors, did a great job putting all of this in place. Now we have the software for years to come.

The top four in each category are what Edelman describes as a fairly diverse group.

“We had great standards like Bram, Lonnie, Charles Williams, Joe Cartwright, Tyrone Clark and Eboni Fondren, and more avant-garde musicians like Mark Lowery, Marcus Lewis, Ben Leifer and Adam Schlozman,” writes Edelman. “But everyone is swinging.”

While musicians are obviously the center of attention here, with nine categories represented, the nominated clubs and radio personalities also lend a lot to KC’s jazz landscape, the president continues, adding that the nominated clubs were the Blue Room, the Green Lady / Black Dolphin, the Phoenix and Corvino.

“Thank goodness these new clubs and more are here,” praises Edelman. “Without them, we wouldn’t have live jazz. They make the KC jazz landscape. Different styles in different clubs, but they all represent concerts for local jazz musicians. It is important.”

In addition, radio hosts David Bass, Roger Wilder, Gerald Dunn and Bob McWilliams all received “favorite” nods.

“They are all important educators and advocates of music, introducing new things while respecting the ‘classics’,” concludes Edelman. “We need both.”


The KC Jazz Ambassadors will present the first-ever JAM Musician Awards at Johnnie’s Jazz Club on Tuesday, December 14. Details about this show here.


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Anderson twins celebrate Christmas, jazz it up – Times News Online https://iridiumjazz.com/anderson-twins-celebrate-christmas-jazz-it-up-times-news-online/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 00:17:07 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/anderson-twins-celebrate-christmas-jazz-it-up-times-news-online/ Posted on December 10, 2021 5:52 PM Will Anderson thinks jazz and Christmas are made for each other. He and his twin brother Peter will prove it at Miller Symphony Hall. Peter and Will Anderson present “A Jazzy Holiday”, 7:30 pm December 10, Main Stage, “Jazz OnStage” Series, Miller Symphony Hall, 23 N. Sixth St., […]]]>

Posted on December 10, 2021 5:52 PM

Will Anderson thinks jazz and Christmas are made for each other. He and his twin brother Peter will prove it at Miller Symphony Hall.

Peter and Will Anderson present “A Jazzy Holiday”, 7:30 pm December 10, Main Stage, “Jazz OnStage” Series, Miller Symphony Hall, 23 N. Sixth St., Allentown.

The Anderson brothers, born and raised in Washington, DC, moved to New York City to attend Juilliard School. Having performed in over 40 states, they have headlined at Carnegie Hall, Blue Note, Jazz at Lincoln Center, Kennedy Center, and Birdland.

They previously appeared at Symphony Hall in October 2019 as the Peter and Will Anderson Trio with Adam Moezinia, guitar, and Vince Giordano, bass saxophone.

For Anderson, jazz and the holidays give a feeling of “hope, joy, excitement and appreciation of beauty.” The Miller Symphony Hall concert features Christmas and Hanukkah carols.

Many holiday songs and hymns have been adapted for jazz arrangements.

“Different interpretations of them over the decades have worked so well. Jazz has taken the shell of the melody and harmony of the songs and changed the rhythm to make them exciting and individualistic, ”said Will Anderson in a telephone interview from his residence in New York City.

During the “Jazz OnStage” concert, the brothers will talk about the history of the songs they play. “We gravitate towards the earlier styles,” says Anderson, mentioning George Gershwin, Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong.

“A Jazzy Holiday” will have its share of fun on stage. Anderson says, “All the musicians we admired were performers and even comedians too.”

The clarinet was part of the reason the Anderson twins turned to earlier styles of music. Each brother started in jazz by learning the instrument. “The clarinet fell out of favor with the decline of swing and big bands, and the louder saxophone became more popular. The clarinet is heard more in the music of the twenties, thirties and forties.

In the “Jazz Onstage” concert, Chuck Redd plays drums and vibraphone. The brothers will play the clarinet, flute and soprano, alto and baritone saxophone. Also playing Joseph Boga, trumpet; Dalton Ridenhour, piano, and Madison Rast, acoustic bass.

The Anderson brothers played with many of their musical heroes when they were young. Anderson says, “It was terrifying. But that’s part of the game. That’s how you grow up. We just kept on practicing.

Tickets: www.allentownsymphony.org; 610-432-6715


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