Usa – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 22:19:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Usa – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 Jazz and Java with instructor Dick Lowenthal https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-and-java-with-instructor-dick-lowenthal/ https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-and-java-with-instructor-dick-lowenthal/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 11:03:20 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-and-java-with-instructor-dick-lowenthal/ PURCHASE OPTION SESSION 1 & 2 PACKAGE AVAILABLE UNTIL OCTOBER 4 Session 1: Early Jazz and Swing October 4 – November 8 Monday from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The origins of jazz, including blues, work songs, and gospel. Using the city of New Orleans as a starting point, the class will listen to and […]]]>

PURCHASE OPTION SESSION 1 & 2 PACKAGE AVAILABLE UNTIL OCTOBER 4

Session 1: Early Jazz and Swing

October 4 – November 8

Monday from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

The origins of jazz, including blues, work songs, and gospel. Using the city of New Orleans as a starting point, the class will listen to and discuss the music of Louis Armstrong, King Oliver, Jelly Roll Morton, and more, and the sociological implications associated with the music. From there, we’ll study the changes in jazz in Chicago and New York and how music evolved into swing. Performers will include Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, Count Basie, Harry James, Gene Krupa and Glenn Miller, as well as various singers who started the swing era. Classes will also include listening to recordings, recommended readings, films, and participating in live concerts.

Session 2: Jazz and cinema

November 15 – December 20

Monday from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Jazz and cinema are a natural combination. The two 20th century art forms began side by side. With the passing of so many jazz greats over the past 50 years, music and presence can only be experienced on recordings and films. We will explore three basic types of films using jazz: Hollywood feature films; all-black films designed especially for black audiences; and special musical short films. It will range from “Black and Tan” by Duke Ellington (1929) and “Stormy Weather” (1943) to Swing Era biographies such as “The Benny Goodman Story” (1955) and “The Glenn Miller Story” (1953) ); and films with contemporary subjects like “The Connection” (1961), “‘Round Midnight” (1986) and “Whiplash” (2014). Classes will include recommended home listening (some films will have a nominal rental fee), several in-class recordings and short films, and discussions.

Instructor Biography:

Richard Lowenthal has been a renowned jazz historian, performer, conductor and educator for 50 years. He founded and chaired the jazz program at the prestigious Manhattan School of Music in New York City and conducted the award-winning jazz orchestra. Additionally, Dick retired as Professor Emeritus at New Jersey City University, having started his jazz program and conducted his award-winning jazz ensemble. He has taught jazz history to students ranging from elementary school through middle school and adult education classes, using his experience as a performer and his extensive collection of records, CDs and books to improve His lessons. As an active musician he has performed and conducted with artists such as: Clark Terry, Bill Watrous, Phil Woods, Jon Faddis, Tony Bennett, Mel Torme, Ella Fitzgerald and Wynton Marsalis. He led the Special Unit of the Glenn Miller Orchestra for over 12 years. His own band pays homage to Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis and Gil Evans, Stan Kenton, Woody Herman and Buddy Rich.

He says, “I love to share my love of jazz music from the 1920s to the present day and to people of all ages. He has successfully taught several courses at the Arts Garage, is in demand for conferences throughout Florida, and is a member of the Arts Garage Board of Directors.

Session 1: Early Jazz and Swing – 6 weeks $ 120

Session 2: Jazz and Cinema – 6 weeks $ 120

Session 1 & 2- 12 weeks $ 215

PURCHASE OPTION SESSION 1 & 2 PACKAGE AVAILABLE UNTIL OCTOBER 4


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Benjamin Croft: back to the future https://iridiumjazz.com/benjamin-croft-back-to-the-future/ https://iridiumjazz.com/benjamin-croft-back-to-the-future/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 09:30:20 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/benjamin-croft-back-to-the-future/ Benjamin Croft on keyboards. Photo by Delphine Orliange “I would call it prog rock / jazz fusion,” says keyboardist Benjamin Croft of his new album. Things far and far away. “There are so many genres of music that influence me: obviously jazz greats like Miles Davis and Chick Corea but also groups like Yes and […]]]>

Benjamin Croft on keyboards. Photo by Delphine Orliange

“I would call it prog rock / jazz fusion,” says keyboardist Benjamin Croft of his new album. Things far and far away. “There are so many genres of music that influence me: obviously jazz greats like Miles Davis and Chick Corea but also groups like Yes and Emerson, Lake & Palmer, singers like Kate Bush and classical composers like Shostakovich, Bartok and Bach. The album is all I’ve heard in my life, really. I don’t decide to write like that: that’s how it comes out.

The musicality of the album is wonderful with contributions from British players such as trumpeter Andy Davies and flautist Gareth Lockrane and Americans including trumpeter Randy Brecker, former Miles Davis guitarist Barry Finnerty and former Chick sidemen. Corea such as guitarist Mike Miller and trumpeter Allen Vizzutti.

How, I ask, did he manage to persuade such luminaries to work with him? «On the previous album [2019’s 10 Reasons To …] I said to people, ‘Can you play like…?’ This time I thought, ‘Why not just skip this step and have the people I asked the musicians on the first album to play?’

“I asked [ex-Chick Corea Elektric Band and Return To Forever guitarist] Frank Gambale first, and he said, ‘Yeah.’ So I thought, “Well, I’ll try my luck again.” I tried Randy and one by one all these people agreed to do it. It’s a three-part process: I sent them my first album – and they loved the music. Then they want to see the cards of the [new] music. Then they want to hear a demo of it, so it’s a little stressful and scary. But everything worked. I would send songs and they would send their parts back, then I would go back to the studio and re-record to match their parts. So it’s quite a long process.

Croft composed the music according to the styles of the musicians. “I was writing for them but the idea of ​​asking them was that they add their own personality and [when] I got the tracks back, it was exactly what I wanted.

It apparently isn’t hugely expensive to hire even such a famous jazz musician as Randy Brecker.

It apparently doesn’t cost a lot to hire even such a famous jazz musician as Randy Brecker. “There are always costs to pay for these people, but it was not millions of pounds! It was like paying a friend of mine in London. They really did it because they loved music.

A few tracks, including the opening overture, feature Helen Vollam, principal trombonist of the BBC Symphony Orchestra. “The trail is almost classic in nature,” says Croft. “I wanted someone who sounded really good and didn’t need to improvise and classical with jazz and rock sets the tone for what’s to come on the album.”

Croft’s solos are improvised. “It never works if you try to fix these problems,” he says. “You have to stay spontaneous. “

Croft actually plays 17 different keyboards on the album, many of which are vintage synths like the Prophet-5 and the ARP Odyssey. “When you have a newer synth that’s fully tuned all the time, you take the weirdness out of it. [but] older synths are unpredictable, almost like real instruments, ”he says. “You have to stop and sort them out. [Or] you might play a chord and get an unexpected sound that gets you to create something new.

Oddly, in the liner notes, Croft states, “No melodica was used at any time in the recording of this album! So what’s her deal with melodicas? What have they ever done to him? “I hate the instrument! It looks like a toy. A cheap toy. Sorry to all melodica fans, but you will never hear melodica on any of my albums!

“A lot of people just go to the piano and wait for something, but not me. I always find a title [which] inspire a concept and then I go for a walk and write the song in my head ‘

The titles of several songs, like The War Against Loudness and How Not To Win The Nobel Peace Prize are funny. “A lot of people just go to the piano and wait for something, but not me,” Croft explains of his composition. “I always find a title [which] inspire a concept, then I go for a walk and write the song in my head and come back, then I sit at the piano and start writing.

Croft used the track title Far And Distant Things for the album title. “That’s what the album is about, geographically and metaphysically,” he says. “These are concepts that may or may not exist, that could occur in the future or could be in the distant past, about places very far away.”

Croft studied at Leeds College Of Music. Despite the current omnipresence of jazz education, some elders still deplore the passage of time when musicians learned on the bandstand. Croft, surprisingly, agrees with them. “I don’t think you can really learn jazz because it’s about finding your own voice and developing it by playing with other people. Music colleges are places for networking, but the best way to learn is by playing concerts. Absoutely.”

After graduating, Croft worked on cruise ships. “I played in the house group. You have to be a good sight reader and play a lot of different styles – you could play an Elvis Presley tribute one night or a Broadway style opera or musical – so maybe that influenced me with the different styles. of the album. But you can’t be doing this yourself, so it’s something you can only do for a short time or else you’ll start to pull your hair out! “

Later, Croft worked in America. “Because they were American cruise ships, all the musicians were American. I was the only Englishman. So just like the University of Music, it was a place for networking and I met some great people. And it seemed like a natural progression to go play with these people in the States. I thought ‘I’ll be there a few months’ and stayed there on and off for 10 years: the Chicago area, then the west coast, some time in New York, Tennessee – everywhere, mostly playing jazz but also many other styles: country, heavy rock, Broadway shows. . . and everything I have played comes out when I write. It all influenced me.

Croft returned to the UK and in 2019 released his debut album, 10 reasons for … Critics have enthusiastically compared his music to that of obscure and famous prog bands like Egg, Caravan and National Health. Was he himself aware of such groups? “They were before my time, but yes. My parents’ record collection led me to listen to them. Yes Near the edge sparked my interest in this genre and from there I listened to everything else.

Few genres have fallen as quickly and as far out of fashion as prog in the late 1970s. But one of the leads on 10 reasons for …, TTE (Time, Talent And Electricity), is dedicated to Keith Emerson, keyboardist of the often-criticized group Emerson, Lake & Palmer. “Although this group is labeled prog, there are elements of jazz, classical. . . everything, really. I have always been impressed with Keith Emerson. Anyone who can play Maple Leaf Rag or a piano concerto in front of 80,000 people, I have respect for!

Croft’s music has also been compared to that of Return To Forever. “Chick Corea has a huge influence and certainly Romantic warrior [1976], he admits. “And this album has been compared to Emerson, Lake & Palmer, so these things pollinate. In the 1970s, these groups were hand in hand.

Kate Bush is a more surprising influence on Croft. “She’s probably the only person who can make me cry, laugh, smile, anything, in the span of a song. I really respect her artistry and she is so musical. The lyrics aren’t your usual love songs, they’re unpredictable, and all she does is perfection. If I had to make a list of the people I would like to work with, I would put it in the head.


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Juneau Jazz & Classics announces the program of the Fall Festival https://iridiumjazz.com/juneau-jazz-classics-announces-the-program-of-the-fall-festival/ https://iridiumjazz.com/juneau-jazz-classics-announces-the-program-of-the-fall-festival/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 02:30:39 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/juneau-jazz-classics-announces-the-program-of-the-fall-festival/ If you’ve been feeling a bit locked in the past few months and looking for a fully vaccinated event to ease your cabin fever, Juneau Jazz & Classics has a solution. The group will present a fall festival in person, from September 29 to October 2, at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center. The concert […]]]>

If you’ve been feeling a bit locked in the past few months and looking for a fully vaccinated event to ease your cabin fever, Juneau Jazz & Classics has a solution.

The group will present a fall festival in person, from September 29 to October 2, at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center.

The concert series will feature award-winning and Grammy-nominated jazz and classical artists including the Judy Carmichael Trio, Helen Hwaya Kim, Jasmin Arakawa and group artistic director Zuill Bailey playing on cello.

“Artists are coming to town. Flights are booked, ”said Sandy Fortier, Executive Director of Juneau Jazz & Classics.

Fortier said members of the public will be required to produce vaccination cards upon entering the concert to make the event possible live and in person. She noted that mask-wearing and social distancing procedures will be in place to ensure public safety.

“All of us – presenters, audiences and musicians – are excited about the return of live music. The world of touring music has gone through the pandemic. We want to continue to do everything in our power to keep the show safe and sound, ”said Zane Jones, Chairman of the Board of Juneau Jazz & Classics, in a recent press release.

Sorry kids

The vaccine requirement means that children under 12 will not be able to participate in concerts this season.

“We’ll make up for it with families in the spring,” said Fortier. “We will have a lot of family events then.”

Fortier said she had seen responses on social media to concert announcements tagged as “date night” or “girls’ night.”

At previous music festivals, free community concerts were held across the city. Fortier said decisions regarding pop-up concerts are on hold and will depend on the community’s COVID-19 situation during festival week.

She also said the group is monitoring the level of risk and is ready to pivot if necessary.

“Our plan now is to present the 2021-2022 festival season as we normally would, doing what we need to do to stay safe, but behind the scenes we are still working on the unexpected and exploring alternatives,” he said. declared Fortier. “Our first concern is the health and safety of our patrons, volunteers and artists, so we take recommendations from qualified public health officials very seriously.”

Meet the artists

Fortier said the concert lineup is full of exceptional talent. Here are the profiles of the featured artists, provided by Juneau Jazz & Classics.

The Judy Carmichael Trio includes Grammy-nominated pianist / singer / songwriter / radio host Judy Carmichael, one of the greatest stride and swing piano performers in the world. She is accompanied on stage by a guitarist and a saxophonist. Count Basie nicknamed Carmichael “Stride”, acknowledging the mastery with which she plays this technically and physically demanding style of jazz piano. Also famous comedian, Carmichael, has been described as “Fats Waller meets Peggy Lee meets Paula Poundstone”.

Violinist Helen Hwaya Kim made her orchestral debut with the Calgary Philharmonic at the age of 6 and has become a respected and sought-after artist. She has performed as a soloist with the Boston Pops at Boston’s Symphony Hall and the Milwaukee and Atlanta Symphony Orchestras. During her time at Juilliard, she was principal violin of the Juilliard Orchestra and won the Juilliard Concerto Competition at the pre-college and college levels. She is the recipient of more than a hundred national and international awards. She won the prestigious Artists International Competition in New York City and, as a result, gave recitals for the first time at Carnegie Weill Hall and the Aspen Summer Music Festival.

Hailed by Gramophone for her “brilliance of character”, Jasmin Arakawa has performed widely on her piano in North America, Central and South America, Europe, China and Japan. Jasmin Arakawa graduated from Tokyo University of the Arts. She holds a doctorate in music and a master’s degree in piano performance from Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. She studied with Emile Naoumoff, the last protege of Nadia Boulanger.

Juneau Jazz & Classics Artistic Director Zuill Bailey will join Kim and Arakawa at various parties. Considered one of the world’s premier cellists, Bailey is an internationally renowned Grammy Award-winning soloist, recitalist, artistic director and teacher.

Contact reporter Dana Zigmund at dana.zigmund@juneauempire.com or 907-308-4891.

Know and go

Visit www.jazzadclassics.org to find a complete list of shows and workshops or to purchase tickets.



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Stars step out as festival comes to life – East Bay Times https://iridiumjazz.com/stars-step-out-as-festival-comes-to-life-east-bay-times/ https://iridiumjazz.com/stars-step-out-as-festival-comes-to-life-east-bay-times/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 15:30:32 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/stars-step-out-as-festival-comes-to-life-east-bay-times/ The Monterey Jazz Festival returns with sold-out shows September 24-26 at the Monterey County Fairgrounds. Here’s a look at some of the A-List musicians performing. And here’s an interview with September 26th headliner Ledisi. Friday September 24 Pat Metheny: The immense talent and versatility of the iconic jazz guitarist is reflected in the fact that […]]]>

The Monterey Jazz Festival returns with sold-out shows September 24-26 at the Monterey County Fairgrounds. Here’s a look at some of the A-List musicians performing. And here’s an interview with September 26th headliner Ledisi.

Friday September 24

Pat Metheny: The immense talent and versatility of the iconic jazz guitarist is reflected in the fact that he is the only musician of any genre to win 20 Grammy Awards in at least 10 different categories. On the opening night of the jazz festival, he will perform with the latest installment of his Side-Eye project, which featured a rotating cast of promising New York musicians. In Monterey, he will be supported by keyboardist James Francies and drummer Joe Dyson. Side-Eye released a new album on September 10. Details: 7 p.m. Jimmy Lyon scene.

Herbie Hancock: The 81-year-old jazz legend has left an imprint on nearly every jazz movement and subgenre over the past 50 years, from fusion to funk to electronics and more – and directs or is a part of so many institutes and musical associations it is like its own State Department. He’s working on a new album. Reports on his recent show in his hometown of Chicago say he’s touched almost every stage of his career. Details: 8:45 p.m. Jimmy Lyon scene.

Mimi Renard: The creative and agile licks of the Bay Area guitarist pair well with the B3 organ, so grabbing her organ trio would be a good investment of your time. Details: 5 p.m., 6.15 p.m. and 8.15 p.m. Yamaha yard scene.

Saturday September 25

Las Cafeterias: This talented group emerged from the Eastside Café in LA, a collective and cultural center formed by indigenous artists and activists from Chiapas, Mexico. Their fiery and skillfully delivered mix of Afro-Mexican, sound, rock, hip-hop, and other sounds has had artists ranging from Lila Downs, Ozomatli, and Juanes lining up to perform with them. Details: 2:30 p.m. Jilly Lyons scene.

Terri Lyne Carrington and social sciences: At age 7, she inherited a drumset from her grandfather, who had performed with Fats Waller and other greats. At 11, she had been accepted into the Berklee School of Music. Such is the unique talent of this drummer, composer, conductor and producer. She has collaborated with artists ranging from Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock to singer Cassandra Wilson and great guitarist Carlos Santana. His group Social Science, a collaboration with pianist Aaron Parks and guitarist Matthew Stevens, released the acclaimed album “Waiting Game” in 2019. Details: 4:00 p.m. Jimmy Lyon scene.

Giveton Gelin Quartet: Nassau, Bahamas, native of Giveton Gelin, a self-taught trumpeter, is a rising star in the jazz world and was recently crowned co-champion of the DCJazzPrixe competition, which rewards young talent. He is due to graduate from The Juilliard School this year. Details: 11:30 a.m., and 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. Yamaha yard scene.

Sunday September 26

Sources of Kandace: If you want to get a taste of who influenced this heralded and expressive young singer and jazz / R&B pianist, check out her 2020 album, “The Women Who Raised Me,” which features covers of tracks affiliated with Roberta Flack. , Lauryn Hill, Nina Simone and Bonnie Raitt, among others. She attributed her vast musical passions to her father, the Nashville Scat Springs session singer / musician, who she said surrounded her with a steady diet of classical recordings as a child. Details: 4:00 p.m. Jimmy Lyon scene.

George Benson: His astounding talents as a guitarist and singer allowed Benson to score hits in a myriad of genres – smooth jazz, pop, commercial R&B – without even anyone suggesting that he was selling himself or wasting his skills. As a result, Benson recorded an incredible number of hit singles, dramatically expanding his fan base and introducing new types of music fans to jazz. Her hits include “The Masquerade”, “Give Me the Night”, “Turn Your Love Around”, “Lady Love Me” and the thrilling live recording of “On Broadway”. With a versatile and moving singing voice, Benson has a huge catalog to work with. Some of his more recent projects include “A Tribute to Nat King Cole” (2013) and “Walking to New Orleans: Remembering Chuck Berry and Fats Domino (2019)”. Details: 5:30 p.m. Jimmy Lyon scene.

Emmanuel Wilkins Quartet: The Philadelphia saxophonist and composer first gained attention in the music world as a much-requested session and touring musician with acts ranging from Bob Dylan to Jason Moran to Solange Knowles. Now he’s a star in his own right, with his 2020 release “Omega” ending on a number of best-of lists. Details: 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 5 p.m. Yamaha yard scene.


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jazz legends Chucho Valdés, Dianne Reeves and Joe Lovano unite for an incomparable evening of duets | VTx https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-legends-chucho-valdes-dianne-reeves-and-joe-lovano-unite-for-an-incomparable-evening-of-duets-vtx/ https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-legends-chucho-valdes-dianne-reeves-and-joe-lovano-unite-for-an-incomparable-evening-of-duets-vtx/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 15:17:53 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-legends-chucho-valdes-dianne-reeves-and-joe-lovano-unite-for-an-incomparable-evening-of-duets-vtx/ Winner of six Grammy Awards and three Latin Grammy Awards, Cuban pianist, composer and arranger Chucho Valdes has pushed the boundaries in the search for new expressions in Afro-Cuban music throughout his rich 60-year career. His musical education includes formal studies and countless nights on Cuba’s best stages as a pianist with his father, Bebo […]]]>

Winner of six Grammy Awards and three Latin Grammy Awards, Cuban pianist, composer and arranger Chucho Valdes has pushed the boundaries in the search for new expressions in Afro-Cuban music throughout his rich 60-year career. His musical education includes formal studies and countless nights on Cuba’s best stages as a pianist with his father, Bebo Valdés, and his orchestra, Sabor de Cuba. Valdés is perhaps best known as the founder, pianist, and principal composer and arranger of Irakere, a flagship ensemble in Cuban music.

Celebrate 80se anniversary in 2021, the technique and creative production of Valdés are still as prodigious. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Latin Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, was inducted into the Latin Songwriters Hall of Fame, and received a DC Jazz Festival Lifetime Achievement Award.

Diane reeves has virtuosity, improvisational prowess and unique jazz and R&B styles that have earned her five Grammy Awards for Best Vocal Jazz Album, an Honorary Doctorate in Music from Juilliard and the honor of being nominated in 2018 National Endowment of the Arts Jazz Master. Her magical and timeless voice and exceptional personality make her a captivating, world-class artist. According to Wynton Marsalis, “She has one of the most powerful, determined and precise voices of this moment or any time.” Reeves’ Grammy-winning album, “Beautiful Life,” embodies the spirit of his historic and extraordinary career, spanning many genres and collaborating with a diverse collection of artists.

Joe lovano is a Grammy-winning saxophonist, composer and arranger. DownBeat The magazine twice named him Jazz Artist of the Year, and he won a prestigious trifecta in 1998: nominations for Musician of the Year, Improviser of the Year and Best Tenor Saxophonist at the New York Jazz Awards. . Lovano attended Berklee in the early 1970s and received an honorary doctorate in music from the college in 1998. In the fall of 2001, he began a prestigious teaching residency at the Berklee Ensemble Department, known as the Gary Burton Chair. in Jazz Performance. Lovano has released nearly 40 albums as a leader or co-leader and has collaborated with many legendary musicians including McCoy Tyner, Hank Jones, Joshua Redman, Bill Frisell, Branford Marsalis, Jim Hall and Paul Motian.

“Duets” is presented in partnership with the Black Cultural Center, Ujima, and the Center for the Study of Cuban Culture and Economy; and supported in part by donations from Don and Libby Drapeau, Dr James M. Shuler and Ms Margaret F. Shuler, and Mr Edwin H. Talley and Ms Melinda P. Talley.

A conversation with Chucho Valdés, piano

Join Valdés as he discuss approaching the piano and answering questions from the audience in person on Wednesday, September 29 at 12:20 p.m. at the Anne and Ellen Fife Theater at the Moss Arts Center. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. A live version of the event will be available on the Mousse Arts Center website.

Ticket information

Tickets for performances are $ 25-55 for the general public and $ 10 for Virginia Tech students. Tickets can be purchased in line; at the Moss Arts Center box office, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday to Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday; or by calling 540-231-5300 during ticket office hours.

Parking is available in the North End Parking Garage on Turner Street for $ 5. Payment must be made in cash at the time of entry. Virginia Tech faculty and staff with a valid Virginia Tech parking permit can enter and exit the garage free of charge. Virginia Tech has also partnered with Mobile Park to provide a convenient, contactless electronic payment option for parking, which can be used at any parking meter, campus parking spot, or parking lot with standard F / S, C / G or R parking.

If you are a person with a disability and would like accommodation, please contact Jonathan Boulter at 540-231-5300 or email jboulter@vt.edu during regular business hours.


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And all that! A world of music, culture and creativity for all ages in Limerick https://iridiumjazz.com/and-all-that-a-world-of-music-culture-and-creativity-for-all-ages-in-limerick/ https://iridiumjazz.com/and-all-that-a-world-of-music-culture-and-creativity-for-all-ages-in-limerick/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 19:01:03 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/and-all-that-a-world-of-music-culture-and-creativity-for-all-ages-in-limerick/ AFTER 18 months of entry and exit from confinement, it is time to reconnect with the magic of the world of creativity, culture and music in Limerick. Following the successful staging of Culture Night Friday, Limerick will host a host of local and international musicians for the tenth Limerick Jazz Festival, which runs all next […]]]>

AFTER 18 months of entry and exit from confinement, it is time to reconnect with the magic of the world of creativity, culture and music in Limerick.

Following the successful staging of Culture Night Friday, Limerick will host a host of local and international musicians for the tenth Limerick Jazz Festival, which runs all next week from Monday September 20 to Sunday September 26.

Bands from Switzerland, Chile and Scotland will perform live during the festival with local music stars and offer a mix of online and live events.

All live events will include assigned seats and other public health metrics.

Online events run Monday through Wednesday and include two specially commissioned performances by Limerick singers Jean McGlynn and Liam O’Brien, recorded live at Lime Tree. Theater.

· International guests are award-winning Philadelphia University of the Arts big band and Irish-born New York guitarist David O’Rourke who will offer and host a masterclass.

· Online events conclude with a performance by Ronan Guilfoyle’s new band Tudo Bem! play classic brazilian jazz.

Live events will run from Wednesday September 22 through Sunday September 26 in Dolans, unless otherwise specified.

See limerickjazzfestival.com for more information and complete listings.



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Karma’s Tea’s “Come Come Down” brings together catchy jazz strings and pop melodies to stun https://iridiumjazz.com/karmas-teas-come-come-down-brings-together-catchy-jazz-strings-and-pop-melodies-to-stun/ https://iridiumjazz.com/karmas-teas-come-come-down-brings-together-catchy-jazz-strings-and-pop-melodies-to-stun/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 11:25:10 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/karmas-teas-come-come-down-brings-together-catchy-jazz-strings-and-pop-melodies-to-stun/ Popular group Karma’s Tea projects their unique vision and artistry with their latest soundtrack “Come Come Down” which perfectly describes their musical values. (The Magazine Plus Editorial): – New York City, New York September 18, 2021 (Issuewire.com) – Looking at the many jazz albums that have crossed the office in 2021, it is clear that […]]]>

Popular group Karma’s Tea projects their unique vision and artistry with their latest soundtrack “Come Come Down” which perfectly describes their musical values.

(The Magazine Plus Editorial): – New York City, New York September 18, 2021 (Issuewire.com) – Looking at the many jazz albums that have crossed the office in 2021, it is clear that few artists have succeeded in creating timeless. sounds. Created by Mike Desroches who is on keyboards and singer / songwriter Mystina, Karma tea are a popular pop / jazz group that merges exotic sounds of contemporary jazz with a sultry touch of R&B and easily engulfs the listener’s attention with their unique arrangements. Setting an incredible standard in terms of musical elements and creative craftsmanship, the two artists tried and tested their unique personalities and stepped up to collaborate and create perfectly enjoyable compositions. Ready to stun audiences with their fresh and original sound elements, the band remains steeped in tradition but breaks with standard material to freely inject modern sounds to stand out.

“Come down” is the latest recording track from their side which is easily accessible to fans of causal jazz and pop while delighting music lovers with its eccentric concept. Whether instrumentally or vocally, the band has demonstrated the potential to be considered a grand name in the industry. Mystina’s soft, silky and inherently smooth voice sounds perfectly balanced as she sings intricately on the custom mixed jazz and pop instruments to create a dreamy ambience. Confidence in the singer’s voice sets the mood as the accompanying rhythms, intriguing sounds of drums and jazz instruments trigger various emotions.

While Mike led the Chick Corea Fusion Band in New York, Mystina is a seasoned singer who breathes rhythm and blues and also performed for Michael Jackson at Webster Hall in 2002. The two artists merge their freshness and reality to create a magic melody. and ‘Come down best reflects their honest intentions. Karma tea is very popular for its haunting musicality and is now available on Spotify, Youtube, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Follow them for more details on their future projects.

Please visit here to listen to Karma’s Tea song: https://open.spotify.com/track/7lnvdrX13ObUK2x0UkVR62



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DC Jazz Festival crowns two winners at annual DCJazz Prize finals https://iridiumjazz.com/dc-jazz-festival-crowns-two-winners-at-annual-dcjazz-prize-finals/ https://iridiumjazz.com/dc-jazz-festival-crowns-two-winners-at-annual-dcjazz-prize-finals/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 20:16:18 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/dc-jazz-festival-crowns-two-winners-at-annual-dcjazz-prize-finals/ The Giveton Gelin Quintet and Dayramir Gonzalez & Habana enTRANCézhe were recently named co-champions of the sixth annual final of the DCJazzPrix, where they finished in an unprecedented tie. The competition took place earlier this month at Union Stage as part of the 17th annual DC JazzFest. The winning groups, both based in New York, […]]]>

The Giveton Gelin Quintet and Dayramir Gonzalez & Habana enTRANCézhe were recently named co-champions of the sixth annual final of the DCJazzPrix, where they finished in an unprecedented tie.

The competition took place earlier this month at Union Stage as part of the 17th annual DC JazzFest.

The winning groups, both based in New York, competed as two of three finalist groups of the DCJazzPrix which also included the vibrant quintet of British saxophonist Camilla George, according to the DC Jazz Festival.

“The highlight of the evening for me was watching the events of the competition, not to mention the support of the team beyond all the artists,” said Gelin. “When the winners were announced, I thought about how our passion for music has led to our success in this year’s competition.”

Launched in 2016, DCJazzPrix is ​​the festival’s international competition created to recognize and support the best emerging talents from jazz groups.

Trumpeter and Nassau, Bahamas, native of Gelin was mentored by the great trumpeter Eddie Henderson and the late trumpeter Roy Hargrove. He conducts the Giveton Gelin Quintet, a classical acoustic jazz ensemble of tradition and original composition with piano, bass, drums and saxophone.

Self-taught at the age of 10, Gelin studied at the prestigious Oberlin Conservatory and the Juilliard School and was selected for the Betty Carter Jazz Ahead training intensive at the Kennedy Center. Its latest version is “True Design”.

Havana-born pianist-keyboardist Dayramir Gonzalez founded Habana enTRANCé in 2004. The ensemble specializes in a contagious form of Afro-Caribbean jazz expression and includes musicians from Argentina and Chile. Gonzalez’s first professional affiliation took place at the age of 16 with the Afro-Cuban jazz ensemble Diákara of former Iraqere member Oscar Valdés. He enrolled in the famous Berklee College of Music and was mentored by Chucho Valdés, Cuban master pianist and conductor and winner of the DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award. The current release of Dayramir Gonzalez & Habana enTRANCé is The Grand Concourse (Machat).

“The whole experience of the DC Jazz Festival has been fantastic,” said Gonzalez. “Through its platform, I was able to connect with a lively audience who listened, applauded and danced my music and also enjoyed my Cuban culture all together. It was an incredible way to continue to build musical bridges between Cuba and the United States, Latin and jazz.

In addition to a cash prize of $ 15,000, the Giveton Gelin Quintet and Dayramir Gonzalez & Habana enTRANCé were awarded a one-year association with the DC Jazz Festival for professional development advice and support for companies responding to their needs. varied needs, such as advertising, artistic and financial management, booking and touring, audience engagement and social media, grant writing, commissioning of new work and brand development.

Each group will also receive a paid engagement on the main stage of the DC Jazz Festival 2022.


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New Astorian at Sawyer Yards and Festival Return Brings Jazz to Houston https://iridiumjazz.com/new-astorian-at-sawyer-yards-and-festival-return-brings-jazz-to-houston/ https://iridiumjazz.com/new-astorian-at-sawyer-yards-and-festival-return-brings-jazz-to-houston/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 11:46:30 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/new-astorian-at-sawyer-yards-and-festival-return-brings-jazz-to-houston/ Mike Moreno poses for a portrait at luthier Stephen Marchione’s store on Thursday, February 11, 2016, in Houston. Moreno is an alumnus of the Performing and Visual Arts High School. (Jon Shapley / Chronicle of Houston) Photo: Jon Shapley, staff / Houston Chronicle Jazz fans can easily find live music several nights of the week […]]]>

Mike Moreno poses for a portrait at luthier Stephen Marchione’s store on Thursday, February 11, 2016, in Houston. Moreno is an alumnus of the Performing and Visual Arts High School. (Jon Shapley / Chronicle of Houston)

Photo: Jon Shapley, staff / Houston Chronicle

Jazz fans can easily find live music several nights of the week in Houston. Yet there remains a quality here / there in which so many of this city’s great artists find their way to New York or Los Angeles for a living, whether it’s Joe Sample or Horace Tapscott, Jason Moran, Robert Glasper or anyone else. what number of early -call drummers and saxophonists.

But a few weekends ago, Da Camera from Houston recently brought in Dafnis Prieto and Dianne Reeves’ big band for two evening performances. Tucked away the same weekend, there was a Sunday afternoon show from great trumpeter Marquis Hill that featured two Houston natives: saxophonist Walter Smith III and drummer Kendrick Scott.

It’s a long way to say that there is more infrastructure for the music industry on the east and west coasts than on the third coast. But Houston players still find their way home, sometimes for a little club gig and other times for a theater performance via Da Camera.

Eric Harland – like Smith and Scott, an alumnus of the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts – got his start here and made a living in New York City. His record credit list is an incredible scroll, from his own group Voyager to work with top players such as McCoy Tyner, Charles Lloyd, Joshua Redman, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Julian Lage, and dozens of others.

Mike Moreno Quartet

When: 1 p.m. Sept. 19

Or: Astorian, 2500 summer

Details: $ 25 to $ 125; prekindle.com

With with Mike Moreno Quartet and Shelley Carrol Quartet

When: 8 p.m. Sept. 18

Or: Miller Open Air Theater, 6000 Hermann Park Drive

Details: free; reserved seats and details at milleroutdoortheatre.com

This weekend, he’s kicking off a new live-action series at the Astorian, an event space near the revitalized arts district of Sawyer Yards. Mike Moreno – a brilliant guitarist, originally from Houston and, yes, a former HSPVA – will be making headlines with his quartet. The show lands on the same weekend as the still young Houston Jazz Festival, which brought Hubert Laws back to Houston two years ago and Ku’umba Frank Lacy last year. This year, Moreno’s band will perform alongside Shelley Carrol, another successful jazz player who made his debut here. The Carrol quartet will perform the famous “A Love Supreme” by John Coltrane.

“Sounds a bit of a gamble,” Harland says of the new venture at the Astorian, a place that more generally hosts weddings and large celebrations. “They were willing to bet on hosting jazz music in Houston. The market does not always work. But I think there are people here who want to keep this music and culture alive. It’s a wonderful art form, I don’t want to see it disappear in Houston. With HSPVA, TSU, U of H, there’s still a lot going on in Houston. “

The plan this weekend is to give Moreno two 45-minute sets, similar to what he would play at a New York club, in addition to his concert at the festival. Harland considers the venue to host long runs for some performers like Glasper or Chris Botti, who can and do perform in large theaters but still enjoy smaller club shows.

While concerts and recording sessions are still largely centered in New York, Houston continues to nurture homecoming. Moran was involved in a multi-year research project in Houston that informed some of his music. And drummer Chris Dave – who has an amazing selection of credits to his name – is back home for a somewhat cryptic project that he says will run for a year.

Moreno seems excited about the possibilities of Astorian, which would give jazz players the chance to come back more often than theater performances allow, which include a show here every three to five years. He has two new albums slated for release in 2022 – one of new original material, the other from a series of online workshops he has hosted through jazz pieces composed for the cinema. His hope is that Astorian will occupy a space that was never quite filled after Rockefeller closed in 1997 and has become a venue for special events, although it is once again open to music.

“I saw Joshua Redman there and ended up in his group years later,” says Moreno. “Joe Henderson, Herbie Hancock. I have seen a lot of these shows. The audience has to be there for it to work, but I think the audience is there. So it’s a place and some promotion behind it. It would be great to have a place with good acoustics where you could come and play more often.

andrew.dansby@chron.com






  • André Dansby

    Andrew Dansby covers culture and entertainment, both local and national, for the Houston Chronicle. He arrived at The Chronicle in 2004 from Rolling Stone, where he spent five years writing about music. Previously, he had spent five years in book publishing, working with publisher George RR Martin on the first two books in the series that would become “Game of Thrones” on television. images you have never seen. He has written for Rolling Stone, American Songwriter, Texas Music, Playboy, and other publications.

    Andrew doesn’t like monkeys, dolphins and the outdoors.


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When This Jazz Singer Goes In Cardiac Arrest, Three Doctors In The Audience Saved His Life | Connect FM | Local news radio https://iridiumjazz.com/when-this-jazz-singer-goes-in-cardiac-arrest-three-doctors-in-the-audience-saved-his-life-connect-fm-local-news-radio/ https://iridiumjazz.com/when-this-jazz-singer-goes-in-cardiac-arrest-three-doctors-in-the-audience-saved-his-life-connect-fm-local-news-radio/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 18:00:44 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/when-this-jazz-singer-goes-in-cardiac-arrest-three-doctors-in-the-audience-saved-his-life-connect-fm-local-news-radio/ THEPALMER / iStock (NEW YORK) – Henry Ray Fischbach, a New York jazz singer, was performing at a neighborhood restaurant in July when he collapsed midway through. “I felt great until this last issue and as I sang this song I started to feel very dizzy and weak,” Fischbach, who goes by the stage name […]]]>

(NEW YORK) – Henry Ray Fischbach, a New York jazz singer, was performing at a neighborhood restaurant in July when he collapsed midway through.

“I felt great until this last issue and as I sang this song I started to feel very dizzy and weak,” Fischbach, who goes by the stage name Henry Ray, told Good Morning America. “I thought I was just very dehydrated.”

Fischbach, 66, had actually gone into cardiac arrest and his heart had stopped beating.

As his wife and other onlookers screamed for help, three medics who stopped by the restaurant for after-work drinks rushed onto the stage to help.

“We could see he was on the floor and by his side,” said Dr. Matthew Simhon, an orthopedic surgery resident at NewYork-Presbyterian / Columbia University Irving Medical Center. “Her skin was very blue. We felt no pulse. He wasn’t breathing at all.

Simhon and his colleagues, Dr Andrew Luzzi, also a resident in orthopedic surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian / Columbia University Irving Medical Center, and Dr Marc Dyrszka, spine surgeon affiliated with NewYork-Presbyterian Och Spine, immediately started doing chest compressions on Fischbach. to bring it back to life.

The trio of medics worked on him for more than 10 minutes, until paramedics arrived with a more advanced defibrillator that managed to get Fischbach’s heart to beat again.

Once in the ambulance on the way to the hospital, Fischbach was alert and able to appreciate the severity of his condition.

“One of the paramedics in the ambulance told me, ‘You just died twice,'” Fischbach recalls. “He told me there were doctors in the audience, but I didn’t know during the show that I was standing a few feet away. Guys who would change my life, who would save my life.

Fischbach was rushed to New York-Presbyterian / Columbia University Irving Medical Center, where he had a stent placed in his left coronary artery to relieve the blockage.

While in hospital and after returning home, Fischbach never knew the names of the three doctors who saved his life and was never able to thank them.

That changed on August 27, when, just a month after suffering cardiac arrest, Fischbach returned to the stage at the same restaurant where he collapsed.

The three doctors were in the audience that evening, thank you to the restaurateur who invited them to come back and meet Fischbach.

“I had the chance to express the inexpressible, the gratitude for saving my life,” said Fischbach. “I dedicated this evening to the three of them and the gift of life and the gift of being able to celebrate music that night.”

“They are the nicest and humblest doctors,” he added. “It’s amazing and they’re just like, ‘This is what we’re doing.’ “

Simhon and Luzzi said they were just grateful to be in the “right place at the right time”.

“The out-of-hospital survival rate after cardiac arrest is very low, so it’s really good that we were able to contribute to his good outcome,” said Simhon. “It was really amazing that we were able to bring him back to his life.”

Luzzi described Fischbach’s return to the stage after saving his life as a “mixture of emotions”.

“Relief is one, gratitude is another for being in the right place at the right time and surprise is another,” he said. “He was back in relatively short order and danced and sang again, which is quite unusual.”

The two doctors also stressed the importance for people to learn CPR and chest compressions so that they can also intervene and help in an emergency.

“To be able to do CPR is really the difference between life and death,” Luzzi said. “Unless someone else also knows about CPR and does what we did, [Fischbach] most likely would not have survived.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


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