Uk – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 01:51:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Uk – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 Wadada Leo Smith at Vision Festival, NYC – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/wadada-leo-smith-at-vision-festival-nyc-london-jazz-news/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 17:03:54 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/wadada-leo-smith-at-vision-festival-nyc-london-jazz-news/ Wadada Leo Smith (Vision Festival Day 1, Roulette, Brooklyn. June 21, 2022. Review by Dan Bergsagel) Wadada Leo Smith with Patricia Nicholson, Founder and Artistic Director of Arts for Art. Photo credit: Eva Kapanadze The first day of the 26th annual Festival of Vision celebrated Wadada Leo Smith by awarding him a Lifetime Achievement Award […]]]>

Wadada Leo Smith

(Vision Festival Day 1, Roulette, Brooklyn. June 21, 2022. Review by Dan Bergsagel)

Wadada Leo Smith with Patricia Nicholson, Founder and Artistic Director of Arts for Art.
Photo credit: Eva Kapanadze

The first day of the 26th annual Festival of Vision celebrated Wadada Leo Smith by awarding him a Lifetime Achievement Award to honor his central role in musical creation (free jazz, essentially). Two immediate conclusions emerge from the showcase of the evening: that this prize is awarded to him as much for his work as a composer and conductor as for his work as a musician.

It was a showcase of many sets, carefully choreographed by Smith with a rugged disregard for the typical demands of an audience – breaks were rare and his address to the crowd was usually done in a gruff voice without the corrupting help of a crowd. ‘a microphone. In less than three hours, Smith presented: compositions for the RedKoral quartet, leading a larger group of the string quartet complemented by drums and two grand pianos at the side of the stage, and led the quartet in conversation with a poetry recital by Thulani Davies. Each composition was a multi-part piece, orchestrated live by Smith from the front of the stage with a mix of traditional sheet music and unique artwork to guide the band, and beckoned various members at various key points to prepare them. to the next phase. . They are expansive, largely unhurried songs, spacious compositions with careful progressions that allow for improvisation within a framework, though the lines between planned and spontaneous are delightfully blurred.

Wadada Leo Smith conducting the RedKoral Quartet (Andrew McIntosh, photo).
Photo credit: Eva Kapanadze

Curiously, fewer people on stage resulted in fewer people for Smith to control, and therefore a better chance of seeing Smith’s varied creativity in action. It was in his duet sessions with Pheeroan akLaff on drums, at the opening and towards the end of the evening, that we saw the most variation and dynamic and textural energy, with Smith focusing his attention on himself and his trumpet, curled up towards his floor mic, or directing akLaff to embark on an array of worked directions and fills. But that’s when Smith was left alone on stage as the sole protagonist of ‘Butterfly Silver’, a 16mm short film by Robert Fenz – of Smith in high contrast in a doorway with his solo contemplative trumpet – which we remember best from his earlier role as a fascinating musician

Wadada Leo Smith is a public figure, so a fine line must be drawn at award ceremonies, a balance struck between maintaining that focus, drawing on his story and gravity, while avoiding the tendency to the event to wrap itself in its own personal importance. Tuesday at Roulette, Vision Festival had gathered a crowd of support, the kind of crowd that greeted the trumpeter with a standing ovation at the entrance. Generally, I would say that the music that was being celebrated requires focus and attention, and the ability to get lost in your own space. And yet, there were times when the profile and scale of the event meant there were photographers busy shooting, organizers pacing back and forth and members of the crowd eager to snack as if they were at a baseball game.

However, perhaps this audio-sensory confusion is part of the plan, and Creative Music is more than the music itself, but something much deeper. Indeed, the very opening of the show could be said to have defined the atmosphere of the night. Early in the evening, Smith took the stage in front of official host Patricia Nicholson. Without a microphone or scheduled speech, Smith launches into a few words. Or, should I say boarded up, because in less than a sentence, someone shouts into the crowd that they can’t hear him. Smith responds – “If you can’t hear me, feel me. And if you can’t feel me, see me”. It is in this collective space between feeling, seeing and hearing that Smith and the Vision Festival met the public for a celebration of his work.

CONNECTIONS: Wadada Leo Smith

vision festival / June 21 program

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Joe Webb – ‘Summer Chill’ – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/joe-webb-summer-chill-london-jazz-news/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 11:45:42 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/joe-webb-summer-chill-london-jazz-news/ Joe Webb– summer cold (Ubuntu Music. Album review by Denny Ilett) As jazz struggled to retain its relevance in the 1960s, and whether by desire or insistence from record companies, artists began to release music with a more “commercial” musical angle. One thinks of Ellington’s “Mary Poppins” suite and Basie’s Beatles and Bond-themed albums. Louis […]]]>

Joe Webb– summer cold

(Ubuntu Music. Album review by Denny Ilett)

As jazz struggled to retain its relevance in the 1960s, and whether by desire or insistence from record companies, artists began to release music with a more “commercial” musical angle. One thinks of Ellington’s “Mary Poppins” suite and Basie’s Beatles and Bond-themed albums. Louis Armstrong released an album of Disney songs. Then there were the pop-jazz-soul recordings of Wes Montgomery, Ramsey Lewis, Jimmy Smith and a host of others bringing contemporary pop sounds to jazz. You could even say that Coltrane’s recordings of “My Favorite Things” from The sound of music and “Chim Chim Cher-ee” from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang had an eye on record sales outside of the usual jazz record-buying audience.

It’s a period often derided by critics and musicians alike, but the fact remains that it kept musicians hard at work and, more importantly, honored the tradition of jazz artists covering themes popular and reworking them; a tradition that dates back to the 1920s.

Enter pianist Joe Webba young virtuoso who’s been making the proverbial jaw drop for a while now, whether through his work with the Kansas Smitty Ensemble or his own Webb City, a trio that honors greats like Art Tatum, Oscar Peterson and Nat ‘King’ Cole .

summer cold, his new project, is an unapologetic nod to the pop-jazz era of the 60s and, as he puts it, bills itself as the “soundtrack to a 60s pool party”. The band consists of Webb himself on piano and organ alongside guitarist Alex Hainesbass player Does Sachdrummer Jas Kayserpercussionist Joao Caetano and saxophonist Fraser Smith.

The sextet plays with a joyful abandon that we would rather see in today’s jazz. The music is fun, uplifting and perfectly played, reminiscent of when jazz was played for dancers; purely for entertainment.

A Bourbon Street-inspired “You Are My Sunshine,” for example, would make Dr. John very happy. The funk-Latin interpretation of “Comin’ Home Baby” presented here does not miss the famous voice of Mel Tormé; the same goes for “Yeah Yeah” by Georgie Fame. The conga-driven swing on Basie’s “Corner Pocket” is reminiscent of one of those great Village Vanguard or Blue Note club recordings with only the clink of glasses and a soft whisper missing to make the scene complete. Clovers’ R&B classic “One Mint Julep” makes the band sound like they’re on the set of Our flint man with Fraser Smith channeling Plas Johnson beautifully.

“Money In The Pocket” by Joe Zawinul, written while he was a member of the Cannonball Adderley quintet, sticks quite faithfully to his original concept of Boogaloo; Haines and Caetano, in the spotlight, taking extended solos.

The album’s closing track “Can’t Help Falling In Love”, first heard in the Elvis Presley movie blue hawaii, here gets the gospel treatment with Joe Webb dueting with himself on piano and Hammond organ; a quiet way to end after the previous nine catchy tracks.

summer cold definitely has a place in today’s jazz scene. Times critic Clive Davis said nearly a decade ago, when reviewing New Orleans singer Lillian Boutté at Ronnie Scott, that her entertainment style was out of fashion, but that musicians would do well to listen and learn. He goes on to say that for jazz to hold its audience, “abstrue chords” would not be enough!

Joe Webb and Summer Chill will launch their new album at the 100 Club in London on August 1. Put on a loud shirt and flares and go!

Summer Chill is out June 24.

CONNECTIONS: 100 club reservations

summer cold at Presto Music

]]> Jazz Dance Company and Mike Piggott both on stage at Eastbourne https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-dance-company-and-mike-piggott-both-on-stage-at-eastbourne/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 13:05:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-dance-company-and-mike-piggott-both-on-stage-at-eastbourne/ jazz dance Spokesperson Aimee Pugh said: “The Jazz Dance Company returns to the stage with a formidable cast of 43 versatile and dynamic dancers. Join this incredible troupe for an evening of endless entertainment with a whole new body of work from leading choreographers in today’s dance and theater scene. “Led by artistic director and […]]]>
jazz dance

Spokesperson Aimee Pugh said: “The Jazz Dance Company returns to the stage with a formidable cast of 43 versatile and dynamic dancers. Join this incredible troupe for an evening of endless entertainment with a whole new body of work from leading choreographers in today’s dance and theater scene.

“Led by artistic director and award-winning choreographer Robbie O’Reilly, the show offers audiences the chance to see the hottest new talents in jazz dance, in a dynamic program of works ranging from the sensuality and lyricism of contemporary jazz to modern street dance and the rhythmic complexities of tap.

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“Produced by London Studio Centre, one of the UK‘s leading conservatories for the performing arts, Infinity is a show that inspires, entertains and energizes at the same time. Discover pure talent and a joyous celebration of dance.

“In the 40+ years since the London Studio Center was established, the conservatory has produced countless performers and professionals who have achieved great success.

“Illustrious alumni include Hollywood and West End stars such as Luke Evans (Beauty and the Beast), Elizabeth Hurley (Austin Powers), Nicholas Pinnock (Django, Top Boy), Gemma Whelan (Game of Thrones) and Scarlett Strallen (Singin’ in the Rain).”

Theater tickets.

Also to come, Splash Point Jazz Club Eastbourne hosts the Mike Piggott Quartet on Wednesday 29th June.

Club spokeswoman Annette Keen promises ‘one of the best jazz violinists in the world’.

“Mike Piggott’s broad approach to playing jazz encompasses a wide range of musical styles from influences of Stefane Grappelli, Stuff Smith and Joe Venuti to bebop and beyond – and he doesn’t stop at the violin. is also a highly respected guitarist who played in the era with bands such as Denny Laine, Georgie Fame, Bert Jansch (Pentangle) and Ralph McTell.

“Mike’s musical background includes a few rock bands, straight jazz and a lot of gypsy jazz.

“His set at Fishermen’s will feature familiar Hot Club tunes, but with a broader focus to also include jazz classics. A popular choice for jazz festivals across the UK and beyond, Mike’s quartet includes his longtime associate Nils Solberg (guitar), Jerome Davies (double bass) and Rod Brown (drums).

The venue is Fishermen’s Club, Royal Parade, BN22 7AA.

Tickets cost £12 at the door in the evening (if still available), or in advance at www.WeGotTickets.com (reservation fee applies).”

Doors open at 7:15 p.m. and the music starts at 8 p.m. and ends around 10:30 p.m.

]]> IMPERIAL TRIUMPHANT recruits jazz legend KENNY G for new single https://iridiumjazz.com/imperial-triumphant-recruits-jazz-legend-kenny-g-for-new-single/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 15:19:11 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/imperial-triumphant-recruits-jazz-legend-kenny-g-for-new-single/ Triumphant Imperial Now Streams His New Single “Merkurius Gilded” Featuring The Composer Max Gorelick and jazz legend Kenny G.. Unfortunately the Steve Blanco-the video clip produced does not present a real appearance of Kenny G. itself, but still – the jazzy shred is there and it’s fantastic. However! The video features appearances by couch slut, […]]]>

Triumphant Imperial Now Streams His New Single “Merkurius Gilded” Featuring The Composer Max Gorelick and jazz legend Kenny G.. Unfortunately the Steve Blanco-the video clip produced does not present a real appearance of Kenny G. itself, but still – the jazzy shred is there and it’s fantastic. However! The video features appearances by couch slut, Seven)Suns violinist Count Maneeinand Gorelick. So that’s pretty cool.

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“What was once a golden age of industry and exceptional growth has only been hit by a panic that will leave the common man in the dust, parched and gone,” said Triumphant Imperial. “Merkurius despises the crowds of Forty Second Street releasing their fortunes into the skies of ignorance.”

Triumphant Imperial bring his mother of greed touring Eastern Europe in May and June. You can catch those dates below. You can also pre-order Triumphant Imperialthe new record spirit of ecstasyto be published on July 22 at their website.

Triumphant Imperial only

5/25 – Brooklyn, NY – Elsewhere
5/30 – Helsinki, Finland – On The Rocks
5/31 – Tallinn, Estonia – Sveta Baar
6/1 – Riga, Latvia – NOASS
6/2 – Vilnius, Lithuania – XI20
6/4 – Gdansk, Poland – Mystical Festival

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with Nero DiMarte

6/6 – Bratislava, Slovakia – Club Kulturak
6/7 – Budapest, Hungary – Robot
6/8 – Cluj Napoca, Romania – Fitness Center
6/9 – Bucharest, Romania – Quantic
6/10 – Sofia, Bulgaria – Live & Loud
6/11 – Skopje, North Macedonia – KC
6/12 – Belgrade, Serbia – KC Grad
6/14 – Zagreb, Croatia – Klub Mocvara
6/15 – Ljubljana, Slovenia – Klub Gromka
6/16 – Vienna, Austria – Viper Room Vienna

Triumphant Imperial only + festival dates

7/9 – Baltimore, MD – Ottobar
7/30 – Youngstown, OH – Into the Festival of Darkness
8/10 – Jaroměř, Czechia – Brutal assault
8/12 – Oxfordshire, England – SUPERNORMAL FESTIVAL
8/13 – Manchester, England – The White Hotel
8/14 – Glasgow, Scotland – Stereo
8/15 – Belfast, England – Voodoo
8/16 – Dublin, Ireland – The Great Social
8/18 – Somerset, England – ArcTanGent Festival
8/19 – London, England – The Dome
8/20 – Méan, Belgium – MÉTAL MÉAN
8/21 – Brittany, France – MOTOCULTER
8/23 – Madrid, Spain – Moby Dick
8/24 – Barcelona, ​​Spain – Sala
8/25 – Toulon, France – The Helix
8/26 – Mantua, Italy – The Academy
8/27 – Winterthur, Switzerland – Gaswerk
8/28 – Strasbourg, France – The Blue House
8/29 – Nijmegen, Netherlands – Merleyn
8/30 – Hamburg, Germany – Hafenklang
8/31 – Aalborg, Denmark – 1000 Fryd
9/1 – Oslo, Norway – Bla
9/2 – Gothenburg, Sweden – Fangelset
9/3 – Copenhagen, Denmark – Hotel Cecil
9/8 – Leipzig, Germany – Bandhaus
9/9 – Tel Aviv, Israel – Gagarin

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Jazz, electric oud echoing Istanbul with the Tunisian Dhafer Youssef https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-electric-oud-echoing-istanbul-with-the-tunisian-dhafer-youssef/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 13:13:52 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-electric-oud-echoing-istanbul-with-the-tunisian-dhafer-youssef/ The Beyoğlu Culture Road Festival continues to organize glorious events for Istanbulites across a number of venues, cultural centers and museums along a route of almost 3.5 kilometers (2 miles). Among the festival spaces, the iconic Atatürk Cultural Center (AKM) offers an exciting program including a wide selection ranging from opera and digital arts, to […]]]>

The Beyoğlu Culture Road Festival continues to organize glorious events for Istanbulites across a number of venues, cultural centers and museums along a route of almost 3.5 kilometers (2 miles). Among the festival spaces, the iconic Atatürk Cultural Center (AKM) offers an exciting program including a wide selection ranging from opera and digital arts, to film events and interviews. The latest event to take place at AKM is a concert by Tunisian oud master Dhafer Youssef, who promises to masterfully blend jazz, Indian and electronic music for listeners.

Youssef was born in 1967 in Teboulba into a modest family from a long line of muezzins whose job is to recite the call to prayer. The entertainer said his family expected him to get a job with a fixed salary. As they were conservative, making music and pursuing a career in it was not easy for them, according to Youssef. However, he discovered his voice through his family, ironically.

In 1996, Dhafer Youssef released his first studio album “Musafir”. (Courtesy of AKM)

The first time he became aware of his voice was when his grandfather introduced him to Koranic recitations. The local muezzin then encouraged him to record the adhan, or call to prayer, for their village. Noting that he was reciting the call using an inexpensive plastic microphone, Youssef recalls that it sounded like a deformed electric guitar. Feeling that his call to prayer might appeal to Jimi Hendrix, he said it was the very first time he had heard electro sound and it was also his first encounter with an audience. That’s why this experience is still alive in his memory even after seven studio albums and hundreds of live performances around the world.

After all, despite his father’s objections, Youssef managed to follow his dreams, not least thanks to the support of his mother and sister. After moving to the capital Tunis and attending the music conservatory, he then went to Vienna for better musical training. “My older sister worked day and night in a factory and sent me everything she earned to help me not to give up when I arrived in Vienna. So, it’s never enough to thank my mother and my sister,” he said.

It was his first time in Europe, and he arrived in the city with a backpack and the equivalent of 20 euros ($21) in today’s money, he says. “I had no friends or family or people I knew. I had to build everything from scratch. However, I had a dream and had nothing to lose anyway. I had thirst for music, discovery and connection with people. The dream of making music allowed me to survive,” he said of his days in Vienna.

Youssef grew up listening to Sufi music in his family home. Revealing that he never thought it would affect his music much and become a big part of him, he said he loved the mystical side of Sufi music, which he later found in jazz as well.


Dhafer Youssef previously collaborated with Turkish clarinetist Hüsnü Şenlendirici and Kanun player Aytaç Doğan.  (Courtesy of AKM)
Dhafer Youssef previously collaborated with Turkish clarinetist Hüsnü Şenlendirici and Kanun player Aytaç Doğan. (Courtesy of AKM)

In Vienna, a world of opportunities welcomed Youssef. In 1996, he released his first studio album “Musafir”, which means “the traveler” in Arabic. By performing this album at the popular Viennese club Porgy & Bess, the artist was offered carte blanche and launched a series of monthly concerts at the club.

As he gained experience with his performances, Youssef released his second album “Malak”, in which he combined melodic structures of European jazz with Mediterranean grooves of a particular form. The artist then went on a successful European tour.

Then in 2001, Youssef recorded “Electric Sufi”. Youssef said that this album was dedicated to the period of his life when he recorded the adhan for the villagers and listened to Sufi music with his family. The jazzy music on this album was an opportunity for the artist to experiment with his voice and use it more as an instrument.

Back in the studio in 2003, Youssef recorded “Digital Prophecy”, in which he united oud and electronic sound in an organic and harmonious way. “Divine Shadows”, in which he used more string instruments, followed later. In his sixth album, Youssef focused on the Persian poet Abu Nawas, who was the greatest exponent of modern poetry in the 8th century. In “Abu Nawas Rhapsody”, released in 2010, he returns to a more jazz and groove style.


Dhafer Youssef mixes jazz, Indian music and electronic music for his listeners.  (Courtesy of AKM)
Dhafer Youssef mixes jazz, Indian music and electronic music for his listeners. (Courtesy of AKM)

Youssef has collaborated with many artists with plural origins throughout his career. The artist, who has always sought renewal, has been enriched by artistic exchanges. In 2011 he invited Turkish clarinetist Hüsnü Şenlendirici and Kanun player Aytaç Doğan to a concert in Germany. In 2013, inspired by this encounter, Youssef released “Birds Requiem”. The success of this album, immediately hailed by critics, is unprecedented, with a triumphant international tour of around a hundred concerts, more than 50,000 records sold and performances by several orchestras including the London Symphony Orchestra.

Youssef has also performed for Turkish listeners in the past. Noting that his music is like the Turkish people, that is to say that it is between West and East, mixed together, he says: “When the Turkish public listens to me, it’s like listening to is like when you see a painting and you feel like it’s you who did the painting. My music for Turkish audiences is exactly like home. This also applies to me, and I feel at home when I play in front of them. I feel like I’m playing for my family, for the people back home. What differentiates Turkish listeners from Westerners is that they share with me the deep feeling of the Orient. My music gives Turkish listeners goosebumps at the same time.

Youssef will perform for fans at AKM this Friday at 9 p.m. Tickets for his concert can be purchased at biletinial.com. To take a trip between East and West, do not miss the concert!

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Louise Parker will bring her Jazz Quartet to Barnstaple https://iridiumjazz.com/louise-parker-will-bring-her-jazz-quartet-to-barnstaple/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 06:03:32 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/louise-parker-will-bring-her-jazz-quartet-to-barnstaple/ Plymouth-based jazz and soul singer Louise Parker will bring her Jazz Quartet to ThePlough@StAnne’s, Barnstaple on Saturday June 11 at 8pm. Louise had a great career, including a coveted place at Glastonbury, and also supported the legendary late jazz musician Humphrey Lytellton. Louise said: “I sent Humphrey my CD ‘No more Strangers’ in 2008, and […]]]>

Plymouth-based jazz and soul singer Louise Parker will bring her Jazz Quartet to ThePlough@StAnne’s, Barnstaple on Saturday June 11 at 8pm.

Louise had a great career, including a coveted place at Glastonbury, and also supported the legendary late jazz musician Humphrey Lytellton.

Louise said: “I sent Humphrey my CD ‘No more Strangers’ in 2008, and he played it on his Radio 2 program. Then he called me and said he would like me to plays with him in London.

“After a few gigs at Bulls Head Barnes he asked me to record with him at his studio in London. He was witty, funny and charming in equal measure.

“It was a day I will never forget. He promised to take me with him on his next tour and said he wanted me to be ‘known’ on the jazz circuit.

“Unfortunately about two months later Humph died in hospital so it never happened. I was invited to his funeral at East Finchley Crematorium.

“There were so many people there, people had to stand outside the chapel.”

Growing up in a home filled with music, from the folk, calypso and opera enjoyed by her Jamaican-born mother to the trad, swing and bebop of her jazz-obsessed father.

Singer Louise Parker, aptly named Louis Armstrong, was born to create the kind of soulful sound that earned her a great reputation in the jazz world.

She is joined by her extremely accomplished and talented quartet for an evening that is sure to be filled with exceptional music.

Tickets for all shows and events can be purchased at www.theploughartscentre.org.uk or through the box office on 01805 624624.

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Retro jazz singer Laura Ainsworth signs with Music Island for South Korea and prepares the next album https://iridiumjazz.com/retro-jazz-singer-laura-ainsworth-signs-with-music-island-for-south-korea-and-prepares-the-next-album/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 21:03:46 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/retro-jazz-singer-laura-ainsworth-signs-with-music-island-for-south-korea-and-prepares-the-next-album/ With his fourth album of new material, You asked for it, Dallas-based singer Laura Ainsworth is expanding audiences for her unique style of award-winning retro jazz all the way to Asia. Ainsworth said, “I am delighted to announce that my label Eclectus Records and Swing City Productions have signed with South Korean music distribution giant […]]]>

With his fourth album of new material, You asked for it, Dallas-based singer Laura Ainsworth is expanding audiences for her unique style of award-winning retro jazz all the way to Asia.

Ainsworth said, “I am delighted to announce that my label Eclectus Records and Swing City Productions have signed with South Korean music distribution giant Music Island to introduce my music to the South Korean market.” A spokesperson for Music Island described Ainsworth as “a great artist” and said they believed she would help develop Korea’s market for traditional American-style vocal jazz.

you asked for it features songs requested by Ainsworth fans and is produced by Ainsworth and her longtime pianist/producer/arranger Brian Piper and mastered by Jessica Thompson, who was Grammy® nominated for her work on Errol Garner’s The complete concert by the sea. The digital release in South Korea on May 27 will be followed by a July 15 release in Japan and the United States on MP3 and streaming, as well as a deluxe Japanese mini-CD which will contain an additional track not available on the American version. The Japanese CD edition of you asked for it will be available for import via Bandwear.com and www.lauraainsworth.com.

you asked for it is a bit of a departure for it, with less of a studio feel and more of an intimate, laid-back vibe. Ainsworth said: “After being stuck at home for so long due to the pandemic, I wanted to celebrate by bringing my amazing band together in the studio.” She was looking for a spontaneous “private party” vibe inspired by her idol Julie London’s classic Julia at home LP which was recorded in the singer’s living room. Ainsworth’s tracklist comes from fan requests at live concerts and via social media, so it’s heavy on standards like “Cry Me A River”, “All The Things You Are” and “Someone to Watch Over Me”, only with his. unique twists.

But Ainsworth promises some curve balls. She said, “Sometimes people take you by surprise with a request out of left field that turns out surprisingly well!” Most notable is his version of the James Bond theme “Goldfinger,” which reworks the explosive original into a haunting jazz piano ballad punctuated by sultry saxophone solos. Instead of portraying a supervillain, Ainsworth seems to be warning other women about a rich, toxic ex-boyfriend.

The release in Japan and the United States of you asked for it will also be accompanied by Jessica Thompson remastering her first three studio albums Keep that for you (2011), Necessarily wrong (2013), and New vintage (2017) which bring vinyl warmth to Laura Ainsworth’s catalogue. The remastered studio albums will be available in MP3 and streaming formats in both countries.

Ainsworth first caught the attention of the Asian market in 2019 when his best-of vinyl LP Upper shelf was picked up by Japanese record store giant Disk Union and received rave reviews in the Japanese jazz press. This convinced Japanese jazz distributor Ratspack Records to take over their full catalog, starting with the release of their first three CDs in Japan in early 2020. In September 2021, Ratspack released a deluxe reissue of the Upper shelf vinyl compilation in mini-LP CD format. The remastered Japanese version by Thompson includes six additional tracks, including the otherwise unavailable release “You’d Be Surprised”, along with detailed liner notes and never-before-seen photos. in addition, Ratspack distributes the Swing City Productions compilation, This is Vintage Now Vol.2: Happiness is a way of life, which kicks off with Ainsworth’s exotic-inspired version of “An Occasional Man.”

Ainsworth grew up with the Great American Songbook, as the daughter of sax/clarinet prodigy Billy Ainsworth who played with big name bands and showroom icons such as Ella Fitzgerald and Tony Bennett. She is known for her soft, satin vocals and her throwback style reminiscent of pre-bop singers such as Rosemary Clooney and Peggy Lee; his band of top-flight Texas jazz musicians; and his musicological bent, unearthing and breathing new life into great, long-forgotten songs. It earned him a profile in Downbeat, rave reviews, and numerous awards and nominations, including an unprecedented triple sweep of the Artists Music Guild Awards for Album, Video and Female Vocalist of the Year for New Vintage.

Now she hopes her music will receive as warm a reception in South Korea as it does in Japan so she can sing for fans there. She said, “I’m ready to fly again, and I’ve already picked out my dresses and my elbow-length gloves!”

To find Laura’s albums and videos, learn more, and follow her on social media, visit http://www.lauraainsworth.com.

For media inquiries, contact Pat Reeder at [email protected].

ON

Laura Ainsworth is a multi-award winning independent retro jazz singer from Dallas. She is known for her soft, sultry voice and elegant pre-bop vocal style; his band of top-flight Texas jazz musicians; put a unique spin on the standards and find and revitalize long-forgotten gems. It’s a style she calls “New Vintage”, which was the name of her third album which won an unprecedented sweep of the Artists Music Guild Awards for album, video and female vocalist of the year. This sophisticated retro style and the Great American Songbook are in her DNA: she grew up watching her late father, big band saxophone/clarinet prodigy Billy Ainsworth, revisit showroom legends such as Tony Bennett and Ella Fitzgerald. His label Eclectus Records recently signed deals to distribute his music in Japan and South Korea. A deluxe LP and CD titled “Top Shelf” was recently released. His next album of new material, “You Asked For It”, will be released in the United States and Japan in July 2022.

CONNECTIONS

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lauraainsworthsings

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LauraAinsworth1

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMzMXvu4Rn_mAB6GdWxHxuOHWqTj30AVy

Reverbnation: https://www.reverbnation.com/lauraainsworth

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/laura-ainsworth-9042b4b

Media Contact
Company Name: Laura Ainsworth
Contact person: Pat Reider
E-mail: Send an email
Call: 800-983-1362
Town: Grand Meadow
State: Texas
Country: United States
Website: http://www.lauraainsworth.com/

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Helena Kay (crowdfunding for new album ‘Golden Sands’) – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/helena-kay-crowdfunding-for-new-album-golden-sands-london-jazz-news/ Fri, 27 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/helena-kay-crowdfunding-for-new-album-golden-sands-london-jazz-news/ Saxophonist Helena Kay left for New York in February 2019 and returned in March 2020. Her next album golden sands is inspired by his time there. A crowdfunder for the new albumm is in progress (LINK BELOW). Interview with Sebastian. Helen Kay. Photo credit: Benjamin Ealovega London Jazz News: A year in New York seems […]]]>

Saxophonist Helena Kay left for New York in February 2019 and returned in March 2020. Her next album golden sands is inspired by his time there. A crowdfunder for the new albumm is in progress (LINK BELOW). Interview with Sebastian.

Helen Kay. Photo credit: Benjamin Ealovega

London Jazz News: A year in New York seems relatively short. Would you have liked to spend more time there?

Helen Kay: Yes. I went to New York on an artist visa that lasts three years, so my original plan was to stay for three years. The pandemic brought me back to the UK after a year on visa. I was going to say “unfortunately”, but actually I’m really happy to be here playing music, meeting friends and spending time with my family. The start of the pandemic was a really horrible time, but there were some upsides, like spending time with my family.

LJN: What was your main idea when you went there??

Hong Kong: I wanted to absorb the American attitude and the music culture there. I love American music, black American music in particular, and had visited NYC several times before deciding to move there. There is such a strong connection to the story. I also wanted to take lessons with some of my favorite musicians in the world and hear amazing music regularly, which I did!

LJN: What have you learned from your face-to-face lessons?

Hong Kong: I had lessons with Melissa Aldana, Chris Cheek and Dayna Stephens when I was in New York. I first met Melissa in Edinburgh years ago, and had a few lessons with her in the UK when she is on tour. She is a huge inspiration to me and a very lovely and generous person. I could say the same of all these musicians, they are very different but they share warmth and generosity. Melissa got me through her rigorous workout routine, Chris got me singing and going back to basics, and Dayna got me exploring some interesting harmonic tracks, among other things. They all know the fundamentals of music so well, it’s one of the main takeaways, and they each have their own unique approach. It was amazing spending time with them and getting to know them, as well as hearing them play.

I also worked for rodney green for a while he taught me a lot too, about music and life. He is a very thoughtful and innovative musician and teacher. (INTERVIEW)

LJN: Are there other aspects of the New York experience that have influenced your music?

Hong Kong: I would say the whole experience of living in New York left a huge mark on me as a person, so in turn will have affected my music. It doesn’t feel entirely tangible or describable, I just know I’m a different person having lived there. I’d like to think that my experiences made me tougher and bolder, and so I hope my music/playing is bolder because of that.

LJN: There must be a story behind the title track ‘Tuesday Club’

Hong Kong: My good friend and photographer John Rogers helped me a lot when I moved to New York. He was working at the Village Vanguard at the time, and used to go to a show there on his night off every Tuesday, and he would invite me over too, along with his friend Amy Lemaire (who’s an amazing performer – glass blower). We’ve heard so much amazing music and met living music legends. We stayed after the show with other staff and often the musicians too. I can’t believe this was my life for a while! It was an amazing time.

LJN: And you admire Carla Bly….

Hong Kong: One of the tracks on the upcoming album is called Carla after the great Carla Bley. I love his writing.

LJN: Now that you’re back, there’s a real “thing” going on in Scottish jazz, especially with Fergus McCreadie and Matt Carmichael. What do you think of that? Are you part of it?

Hong Kong: I feel very lucky to be part of the scene here in London and also have the regular opportunity to perform in Scotland. I wouldn’t say that I’m necessarily part of the scene up there, I think being part of a scene involves going to concerts as well as playing them, and contributing in other ways, to moving the things. There’s a very vibrant scene in Scotland led by amazing musicians who I’m proud to call my friends, and I’m lucky enough to be part of it from time to time. I always feel like I’m coming home when I play there. As I get older I feel the bond with this country grows stronger, especially after living away from the UK, your nationality becomes a big part of your identity.

I’ve known Fergus for a long time (we were both at FYJO together, I think he was around 12 when we met), and I’m really excited to see what he does next. Same with Matt Carmichael – he blows my mind every time I hear it. I was thinking about it after recording a big band album with my good friend Sean Gibbs (another Scot); it’s really exciting to grow old and see your friends (as well as yourself) grow and do amazing things. I’ll only mention a few more while we’re at it – Anoushka Nanguy, Liam Shortall, Paul Towndrow, Alan Benzie (& much more!)

LJN: Is London home now or Scotland?

Hong Kong: I live in London, Harringay to be precise, and I love this part of London. I am in Scotland so regularly that I also feel at home. I am very lucky to be in this position.

LJN: Who are the musicians on the new album?

Hong Kong: I have a great group, I’m grateful to be able to play and spend time with these people. David Ingamells been part of the band from the start, we first met at Guildhall. He pushes me to do better every time I play with him. He also has a good sense of humor. I knew Calum Gourlay because before I moved to London he was from Fife and we both had a similar musical education (Fife Youth Jazz Orchestra, NYJOS, Tommy Smith Youth Jazz Orchestra). He’s the glue that holds us all together, and he plays bass beautifully. I decided for this album to move from the trio to the quartet because some of my new compositions require a chord instrument. scottish pianist Peter Johnson and I started dueting together in 2017, we had some great gigs, some of my favorites, and I love the way he performs my music. It is also a ball of positive energy with which it is pleasant to work.

LJN: Your last album was with KIM Trio… is it a quartet… or what?

Hong Kong: I keep the name KIM Trio, because this album looks like the sequel to my first album Moon Palace, and also because I would like to continue with the KIM Trio + special guest format. Vibraphonist Jonny Mansfield will be joining us for a few gigs in July, East Neuk Festival on July 1 and The Oxford in Kentish Town on July 11.

LJN: What is crowdfunding used for?

Hong Kong: City Music Foundation helped me set up a crowdfunder to cover the costs of everything that turns a recording into an album – mixing, mastering, illustration, design, video, printing, PR. I was able to cover the costs of the recording session myself, but now I need help with the next steps, to make the music an album that can be released to the world. We aim to raise £4,000 by July 1.

Sebastian Scotney is a member of the advisory board of the City Music Foundation

golden sands will be available for pre-order on Bandcamp in July. The release of the singles is tentatively scheduled for August. Album release date: September 2.

Concert dates:

June 23 – KIM Trio at the Elgar Room, Royal Albert Hall 9:30 p.m. Calum Gourlay and David Ingamells

July 1 – KIM Trio + Jonny Mansfield at East Neuk Festival

July 11 – KIM Trio + Jonny Mansfield at The Oxford, Kentish Town, 8:30 p.m.

CONNECTIONS: SPECIFIC FUNDING

Biography on Helena Kay’s website

Interview for #IWD2020 with Alex Hitchcock

City Music Foundation – artist page

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Jacob Holm-Lupo launches new prog jazz band Solstein https://iridiumjazz.com/jacob-holm-lupo-launches-new-prog-jazz-band-solstein/ Sat, 21 May 2022 13:17:07 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jacob-holm-lupo-launches-new-prog-jazz-band-solstein/ Jacob Holm-Lupo (White Willow/Donner) has unveiled his latest musical project, a progressive jazz quartet called Solstein, who have signed with Norwegian band Is t Jazz? label (owner of the excellent Soft Ffog) and which will release its first album, The SkerryLater this year. Alongside Holm-Lupo, Solstein features drummer Keith Carlock, who also worked on Donner’s […]]]>

Jacob Holm-Lupo (White Willow/Donner) has unveiled his latest musical project, a progressive jazz quartet called Solstein, who have signed with Norwegian band Is t Jazz? label (owner of the excellent Soft Ffog) and which will release its first album, The SkerryLater this year.

Alongside Holm-Lupo, Solstein features drummer Keith Carlock, who also worked on Donner’s hesitant light album, guitarist Stian Larsen and keyboardist Brynjar Dambo, who also worked with White Willow and Donner.

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Line-up announced for Jazz East Jubilee at Barking Abbey https://iridiumjazz.com/line-up-announced-for-jazz-east-jubilee-at-barking-abbey/ Tue, 17 May 2022 08:25:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/line-up-announced-for-jazz-east-jubilee-at-barking-abbey/ Published: 09:25 17 May 2022 A free outdoor family music festival to be held in Barking and Dagenham next month has announced its jazz lineup. Barking’s Jazz East Jubilee is held to celebrate the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee on June 4, with bands such as Brass Bottom Boys, the Sultan Stevenson Trio and Cong-Fusion performing at […]]]>

Published:
09:25 17 May 2022



A free outdoor family music festival to be held in Barking and Dagenham next month has announced its jazz lineup.

Barking’s Jazz East Jubilee is held to celebrate the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee on June 4, with bands such as Brass Bottom Boys, the Sultan Stevenson Trio and Cong-Fusion performing at the event.

The evening will end with headliners Snowboy and The Latin Section, who organizers say are Europe’s premier Afro-Cuban jazz band.

The performers – all of whom have links to east London or Essex – will perform from 3pm to 8pm at the ruins of Barking Abbey.


The festival will take place in the ruins of Barking Abbey
– Credit: Paul Bennett

It is organized by the London East Jazz Network, who say they want to bring the art, culture and music of jazz to East London, Essex and beyond.

Jazz East Jubilee director Mark Kass says Barking Abbey is the perfect location for the festival.

“East London’s jazz heritage is unbeatable with the likes of Ronnie Scott, John Dankworth, Dagenham-boy Dudley Moore and others all born or raised on this right side of London and at Jazz East Jubilee,” he said. -he declares.

“We’re going to show the world how cool we are here, as we showcase 70 years of incredible, world-class jazz in the stunning ruins of Barking Abbey.”

Mark added: “Her Majesty’s incredible 70 year reign has seen incredible transformation in all forms of jazz music and her 70 year reign shows how far the evolution and influence of jazz has come from her roots in the United States, through swing and traditional jazz, bebop, fusion, jazz funk to contemporary afrobeat and hip hop styles.”

He promised the long-time jazz lover and those listening to him for the first time that this is “not just a festival, this is a true royal celebration”.

This festival is part of a series of events that take place across Barking and Dagenham during the sunny months, known as the summer of festivals.

It also includes the Barking Folk Festival on June 3, the One Borough Festival on July 23 and the Steam and Cider Fair on September 10.

Jazz East Jubilee is scheduled as part of the borough’s Platinum Jubilee Weekender events on the holiday.

Archant also marks the historic jubilee with a special souvenir magazine. For more information and to order online, go to www.gblshop.co.uk/jubilee

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