Uk – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 14:02:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Uk – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 The best jazz festivals in 2022 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-best-jazz-festivals-in-2022/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 14:02:35 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-best-jazz-festivals-in-2022/ Beautiful melodies, unreal improvisation, unbeatable talent and burning passion. These are just some of the characteristics of jazz music that make it so irresistible. But nothing beats live jazz music. Experiencing the feeling firsthand as talented artists fill the air with jaw-dropping chord progressions while you stand amongst equally passionate music fans is simply unbeatable. […]]]>

Beautiful melodies, unreal improvisation, unbeatable talent and burning passion. These are just some of the characteristics of jazz music that make it so irresistible. But nothing beats live jazz music. Experiencing the feeling firsthand as talented artists fill the air with jaw-dropping chord progressions while you stand amongst equally passionate music fans is simply unbeatable.

So here’s our list of the best jazz festivals you should absolutely watch out for in 2022. With lineups that feature household names and up-and-coming talent, you’re sure to find a festival that speaks to you here.

Maiden Voyage Festival

Programming 2022: Ahadadream, sour arabic, Balimaya Project, Hunea, Lady Shaka, Manami, Heavenly Shanti, Tash LC, underground resistance (live), VTSS, Yung Singh and many more

When: August 28

Or: Lee Valley Showground, London

Possibly the best festival for those who want to attend an incredible and incredibly diverse festival without breaking the bank, Inauguration trip is back with an eclectic lineup of jazz, hip hop, electronic, soul, world music, techno and more.

Festival fans know all too well the heartbreaking feeling of your favorite artists going head-to-head. This is perhaps the worst thing about music festivals. Corn Inauguration trip seems all too aware of the pain itself and has taken action by having the performers share the same stage to avoid any heartbreaking clashes. Perfect!

As always, ticket prices will increase with each release, so save a few Euros and secure your tickets now!

Find tickets for Maiden Voyage Festival – here


Cross the tracks

Programming 2022: Keiya A, Khruangbin, Joy Crookes, Patrice Rushen, Sampa the Great, Mereba, Roy Ayers

When: June 5

Or: Brockwell Park, London

Cross The Tracks returns to Brockwell Park with another amazing and diverse lineup. This year’s participants can expect Roy Ayers, composer of funk, soul and jazz, singer-songwriter of RnB and soul Mereba, neo-soul artist Joy Crookes, mix of genres Patrice Rush and much more.

Cross The Tracks is a festival that not only celebrates music on a show, but is a day filled with food, workshops and conversation. Within this, you can expect London’s best craft beer brewers, a wellness area and creative markets that include a record and art fair. It’s a celebration of jazz, soul, funk and what the surrounding culture has to offer. You can’t help but count the days until this jazz festival is back!

Find tickets for Cross The Tracks – here


Burton Agnes Jazz and Blues Festival

2022 programming: to be determined

When: July 8 – 10

Or: Burton Agnes Hall, Driffield

In July 2022, the UK’s only three-day independent jazz festival will return for its fourteenth edition. Located in the picturesque Burton Agnes Hall, lucky jazz fans can experience the best jazz and blues performances in Driffield, Yorkshire, while sampling a range of food, award-winning ales, cafe pastries, roast coffee locally and more.

This festival is a family event with a laid-back attitude, a kids’ area and 15 acres of garden to explore. The lineup has yet to be revealed, but rest assured there will be plenty of atmosphere for you to soak up. Whether you’re looking to dive headfirst into the action and get upfront for your favorite jazz number or just kick back and soak up the atmosphere, Burton Agnes Jazz and Blues Festival is the perfect choice.

Find tickets for Burton Agnes Jazz & Blues Festival – here


New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival


Image credit: Joshua Brasted

2022 programming: to be determined

When: April 29 – May 8

Where: Fair Grounds Racetrack, New Orleans

New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival has a proud history. Since 1970, this huge event in Louisiana’s largest city has lasted more than a week. With more than 12 music stages, the list of alumni of this festival is quite incredible, with Stevie Wonder, BB King and MacFleetwood Just to name a few.

While more genres than ever are showcased at the festival, there’s no denying that it’s a dream come true for any fan of jazz music. It’s a chance to get deeply grounded in all the culture and celebration surrounding jazz music and make the most of a thriving local music scene.


Manchester Jazz Festival

2022 programming: to be determined

When: to be determined

Where: to be determined

Manchester Jazz Festival is the city’s longest-running festival and is set to return in 2022 for another surreal weekend of sweet tunes. From humble beginnings in 1996 with just one venue and ten bands, MJF has grown into a gigantic festival with nine days of unmissable music, making it one of Britain’s biggest and best jazz festivals.

Although nothing has been confirmed yet, the festival takes place every year except in 2020 for which, of course, we can thank corona. So we can expect it to grace the city center again in 2022. To give you an idea of ​​what might be in store, last year’s lineup consisted of Nubiyan Twist, Camilla George, Binker Golding Band, Mr. Wilson’s second stunt doubles, and unknown orchestra X Mali Hayes.


Scarborough Jazz Festival

2022 programming: to be determined

When: to be determined

Where: Spa Scarborough, Scarborough

This huge event on the Yorkshire coast in Scarborough is a celebration of jazz music, with three days of afternoon and evening sessions giving you a whole range of performances. Last year’s event saw the return of Tony Kofi, Alan Barnes Octet and David Newton. On top of that, a host of new faces have also appeared, such as the violinist John Pearce and pianist Fergus McCreadie.

What more could you ask for than seeing world-class musicians by the sea? Scarborough Spa’s setting is also something to do with the elegant Victorian architecture being a wonderful spot as the sea laps the nearby shore.

While no artists have yet been confirmed for the festival, we know they’ll knock it out of the park like they always do.


Telluride Jazz Festival

2022 programming: to be determined

When: to be determined

Or: Telluride, Colorado

Telluride Jazz Festival can certainly claim to have one of the most unique festival venues on Earth. Perched high above the Rocky Mountains in southwestern Colorado, the natural aesthetic alone is truly wondrous. Held since 1977, this historic festival is three days entirely focused on jazz.

The festival itself is small in size and offers an intimate experience as you enjoy works from acclaimed artists, Grammy winners and excellent upcoming student groups. It’s a unique chance to get up close with some of your favorites.


North Sea Jazz Festival

Programming 2022: john legend, Lionel Richie, Alicia Keys

When: July 8-10

Or: Rotterdam, Netherlands

While this range is admittedly more star-studded and commercial than the rest of the list, North Sea Jazz Festival will soon be adding more artists to its roster and is still very jazz oriented.

In the past, this festival whopper had Miles Davis, Sarah Vaughan, Urban Saxo, Gary Clark Jr., Ray Charles, and many other big names grace the stage, so you can count on the organizers to deliver a stunning lineup in 2022. The festival has been held annually since 1976 and is now a massive and highly respected festival attended by around 75,000 lucky music fans can attend. experience every year.

If jazz is a passion, this is a festival to watch.


Many incredible jazz festivals are waiting for you to discover them. But with tickets selling out fast, it’s a good idea to book your tickets now to avoid disappointment.



Have these jazz festivals got you excited for festival season this year? Click on here to view our festival guides and choose from a host of events happening in 2021.

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Header Image: Telluride Jazz Festival (Facebook)

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Ian Shaw & Friends at Pizza Express Jazz Club Soho (23-31 January 2022) – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/ian-shaw-friends-at-pizza-express-jazz-club-soho-23-31-january-2022-london-jazz-news/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/ian-shaw-friends-at-pizza-express-jazz-club-soho-23-31-january-2022-london-jazz-news/ Overview Ian Shaw’s January guests. Clockwise from top left: Heather Bambrick, Guy Barker, Madeline Bell, Polly Gibbons, Natalie Williams, Claire Martin, Joe Stilgoe, Clare Teal, Tony Kofi Sébastien writes: At this time of year, please forgive me for a little nostalgia. On Saturday January 10, 2009, I wrote the very first article for this site. […]]]>

Overview

Ian Shaw’s January guests. Clockwise from top left: Heather Bambrick, Guy Barker, Madeline Bell, Polly Gibbons, Natalie Williams, Claire Martin, Joe Stilgoe, Clare Teal, Tony Kofi

Sébastien writes:

At this time of year, please forgive me for a little nostalgia. On Saturday January 10, 2009, I wrote the very first article for this site. It was a preview of the 2009 Ian shaw residence at Pizza Express Dean Street (LINK).

And now, thirteen years and almost 11,000 articles later, here’s a quick look at this year’s jamboree. The residency opens a year that will contain an important anniversary for the diamond born in St Asaph… in June.

It has a fabulous lineup of guests for the fourteen concerts over nine days to Pizza. The booking link with all the details such as a description of each program can be found at the bottom of this article.

COMPLETE PROGRAM

  • Sunday January 23 – IAN SHAW and CLAIRE MARTIN (£ 25)
  • Monday January 24 – IAN SHAW with NATALIE WILLIAMS (£ 20)
  • Tuesday January 25 – IAN SHAW with TONY KOFI and BARRY GREEN, piano (£ 20)
  • Wednesday January 26 – IAN SHAW with POLLY GIBBONS (£ 20)
  • Thursday January 27 – IAN SHAW with CLARE TEAL in ‘Blame It On My Youth’ – shows at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. (£ 25 / £ 25)
  • Friday January 28 – IAN SHAW with HEATHER BAMBRICK and JAMES PEARSON, piano – shows at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. (£ 25 / £ 15)
  • Saturday January 29 (noon) – IAN SHAW with GUY BARKER in ‘City to City’ (£ 25)
  • Saturday 29 January (evening) – IAN SHAW with his TRIO – shows at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. (£ 25 / £ 15)
  • Sunday January 30 (lunch time) – IAN SHAW with JOE STILGOE in ‘I am connected – The spirit and the wonder of words and music ”(25 £)
  • Sunday January 30 (evening) – IAN SHAW with MADELINE BELL and BARRY GREEN, piano (£ 25)
  • Monday January 31 – IAN SHAW and MADELINE BELL In Music and conversation (£ 25)

LINK: RESERVATIONS / DETAILS FOR Ian Shaw & Friends at Pizza Express Jazz Club Soho

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Newport Jazz and Folk Festivals Announced New Stage of Ticketing with DICE Partnership https://iridiumjazz.com/newport-jazz-and-folk-festivals-announced-new-stage-of-ticketing-with-dice-partnership/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 17:56:48 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/newport-jazz-and-folk-festivals-announced-new-stage-of-ticketing-with-dice-partnership/ (CelebrityAccess) – The Newport Jazz and Folk Festivals have announced an exclusive partnership with DICE, a music discovery and ticketing platform known for its fan-friendly practices. DICE will digitally record each event for the first time in the history of the festival. Both festivals are held at Fort Adams State Park in Rhode Island every […]]]>

(CelebrityAccess) – The Newport Jazz and Folk Festivals have announced an exclusive partnership with DICE, a music discovery and ticketing platform known for its fan-friendly practices. DICE will digitally record each event for the first time in the history of the festival. Both festivals are held at Fort Adams State Park in Rhode Island every July.

The two renowned festivals, created by George Wein in the 1950s, are among the oldest music festivals in history. Legendary musicians and performers have graced their stages throughout their remarkable history. Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton and Ella Fitzgerald to name a few. Both festivals are known for their unexpected guests and unexpected collaborations. In 2017, Roger Waters shocked fans when he took the stage to join John Prine’s set for an acoustic performance of “Hello in There” or in 2018 when Mumford & Sons’ headlining set was kept under wraps. ‘at the time they were announced. It is in such cases that the festival sells out even before the lineup is announced each year.

London-based DICE, which just opened a second office in New York, has joined forces with locations and promoters around the world to grow its brand and grow at a rapid pace. In addition to partnering with Newport Jazz and Folk Festivals, they also provide ticketing for promoter Brooklyn Made, Ibiza’s Circoloco, New York’s Le Poisson Rouge and have acquired live dance music streamer, Boiler. Room in September.

As the Newport Festivals Foundation press release shows, “Each year of the event, we work with our partners to innovate beyond traditional ticketing,” says Jay Sweet, executive producer of Newport Folk. “The most important thing for us is that the fans have a fantastic experience, and we know that this experience starts long before the doors open to our event. In a year where fans deserve to come out and see the music they love, we know DICE is the right partner in making things as easy as possible, fair, transparent and intuitive for our Newport family. We want these tickets to be in the hands of our fans, not in the secondary market. “

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2020 version of both festivals has been canceled while 2021 delivered scaled-down versions. The 2022 festivals are scheduled for July 22-24 (Newport Folk Festival) and July 29-31 (Newport Jazz Festival) respectively. With the threat of the Omicron variant in the air at press time, hopefully these two cultural institutions will be able to entertain audiences and other performers in 2022.


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]]> EDQ: They’re all on that old road https://iridiumjazz.com/edq-theyre-all-on-that-old-road/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:57:47 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/edq-theyre-all-on-that-old-road/ … EDQ for Elton Dean Quartet. Previously, Dean had been a member of Tippett’s classic sextet, and Moholo-Moholo notably led the band Chris McGregor. They are two of the most exciting bands of the late sixties. Dean had also been in Soft Machine during the period that this band evolved from art-rock to jazz-rock fusion, […]]]>

… EDQ for Elton Dean Quartet. Previously, Dean had been a member of Tippett’s classic sextet, and Moholo-Moholo notably led the band Chris McGregor. They are two of the most exciting bands of the late sixties. Dean had also been in Soft Machine during the period that this band evolved from art-rock to jazz-rock fusion, but in addition he conducted or participated to projects that ventured into more experimental fields. Its versatility is evident in this session. The EDQ also benefits from the inclusion of Laurence, in great demand in both the jazz and classical fields.

The album is subtitled “The Seven Dials Concert” and brackets the content of the original LP with unreleased performances by Naima, Here’s That Rainy Day, Attic and Echoes. The Seven Dials in Shelton Street in London was one of the venues where the London Jazz Center Society gave concerts by the cream of the British scene of the time, including several members of the South African diaspora, represented here by Moholo-Moholo. I used to go to these shows when I could and wish I had been at this one. If this was a capsule review, I would just say “Superb. Buy it ‘, but I guess I should elaborate.

As Matthew Wright observes from the cover art (Wright had been director of the Seven Dials Jazz Club), John Coltrane’s influence is often evident, and not just from his last free-jazz period: Trane’s beautiful Naima is here. ‘one of the most unexpected performances based on ballads alongside Nancy, an aria Trane favored. Most of the time, however, the music is intense and complex, with technically remarkable playing: particularly compelling is a device Tippett introduced early in Edeepub, turning the piano into a sort of titanic gong. The music is at its peak when Laurence’s bass introduces a long prelude to a warm but slightly acerbic Rainy Day. Later, on a cheerful Easy Living, Dean’s saxello is reminiscent of Trane’s standard soprano saxophone.

In the wildest passages, Tippett’s hands seem to suggest two independent players, who nonetheless always cooperate and are always consistent and on Naima in particular he demonstrates that he is also capable of elegant, empathetic, relatively conventional accompaniment as well. than to contribute to a beautiful solo. His work on Dean’s Dede-Bup-Bup (which at least starts off as a freewheeling neo-hard-bop) is a particular delight, and the entire concert reminds us of what a powerful and versatile talent we lost with his death. in June 2020.

These four players are all important characters in their own right, but they form a well integrated unit where no one tries to cut anyone off and even in the freest passages there is a strong sense of cooperation and mutual support. .

Discography
Edeeupub; Here is that rainy day; Naima; Dede-Bup-Bup; Nancy (With the laughing face); Easy life; to overdo ; Not too; Attic; Echoes (79.46)
Elton Dean (ace, slo); Keith Tippet (p); Chris Laurence (b); Louis Moholo-Moholo (d). Seven Dials Club, London, November 18, 1976.
Ogun OGCD 048


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Stick men, scribbles and all that jazz: how AR Penck made great art simple | Art https://iridiumjazz.com/stick-men-scribbles-and-all-that-jazz-how-ar-penck-made-great-art-simple-art/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/stick-men-scribbles-and-all-that-jazz-how-ar-penck-made-great-art-simple-art/ In 1979, the Stasi entered Ralf Winkler’s studio in Dresden and sacked the place. It was the culmination of a campaign of harassment against the artist, who came to prominence under the pseudonym AR Penck, for refusing to make social-realistic propaganda. Instead, his paintings featured oft-repeated hieroglyphics, odd symbols and signs, seemingly childish naive scribbles, […]]]>

In 1979, the Stasi entered Ralf Winkler’s studio in Dresden and sacked the place. It was the culmination of a campaign of harassment against the artist, who came to prominence under the pseudonym AR Penck, for refusing to make social-realistic propaganda.

Instead, his paintings featured oft-repeated hieroglyphics, odd symbols and signs, seemingly childish naive scribbles, and simple stickmen (often with oversized penises). The authorities are right to be wary of this new pictorial style: Penck seeks to construct a new language, mixing linguistic and pictorial, at the same time “universal” and “democratic”. It was a wish born out of the trauma of WWII, especially witnessing the destruction of Dresden as a child, and the ensuing dystopia of the German Democratic Republic.

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Penck’s visual language, which he called “standard” is, at least on the surface, a language that could be mastered by anyone. There is a “building block system,” as he once said; a glossary of patterns to pick and play as you wish. In fact, few would bring the rhythm and lyricism that jazz fan Penck brought to the canvas. With their profusion of googly eyes, humanoid shapes, beasts and birds, his paintings are suggestive of the real world, but they also draw on abstraction theories, in which zeros, crosses and dots other symbols flirt on the surface of a work with a pride of pure pictorial gesture.

Escaping his censors, Penck smuggled paintings west with the help of Cologne gallerist Michael Werner, whose artist worked with the gallery until his death in 2017, and who now represents the Penck domain. A new exhibition at Werner’s Gallery in London traces the artist’s career, from his beginnings to the international fame he eventually found. Most evidence indicates that it was the Stasi raid that catalyzed his defection in 1980 but, more likely, the East Berlin regime sold the artist to his counterparts across the wall as part the lucrative and top-secret Häftlingsfreikauf program, which enabled the GDR to bring in much-needed foreign currency and get rid of intellectual troublemakers. Either way, for Penck, it was a relief.

Based in Cologne, the artist frequents Georg Baselitz, Jörg Immendorff, Anselm Kiefer and Sigmar Polke, a gang that the press has dubbed the Neue Wilde – the Young Savages. More formally, throughout the 1980s, these artists developed between them a neo-expressionism, a form of painting characterized by its brutal emotional force. While Penck’s importance to this new genre has been confirmed by his appearance on key poll shows, Zeitgeist at Gropius Bau, Berlin, in 1982, and New Art at the Tate, in London, a year later, the artist’s raw material reveals a more nuanced set of references.

The science fiction that Penck read as a child while RAF carpet bombarded Dresden remained an enduring influence, while a set of rarely seen textile sculptures, included in Werner’s new exhibit, underscore his interests in genetics, the ecology, systems theory and cybernetics. With his work, Penck sought to understand how people, objects and ideas rub against each other, how thoughts can be expressed beyond words, and how a path out of the conflict inherent in the world can be charted. .

Go figure: four works by AR Penck

Untitled, 1966. Photography: Michael Werner Gallery

Untitled, 1966

In one of the first works in the exhibition, the artist’s interest in systems is exposed. We see a man picking a fruit, before showing it eating and finally defecating. Far from demonstrating man’s divine supremacy over nature, his internal organs are reduced to knots in a natural ecosystem.

tskrie VIII, 1984
tskrie VIII, 1984. Photography: Michael Werner Gallery

tskrie VIII, 1984

Penck also spent time in London. The title of the largest work in the exhibition is an anagram of “strike” and is a tribute to the struggle of the miners. Despite the harassment he suffered in East Germany, Penck was sympathetic to socialism. “Everything is paradox and schizophrenic… reactionary and progressive, decadent and fascist,” he said of the politics of his work. “So I am! You are too!”

J, 1978
Y, 1978. Photography: Michael Werner Gallery

J, 1978

We can assume that this is a self-portrait, although the man with the stick has no features. “Y” was one of the many names Penck exhibited under (others include “Mickey Spilane” and “Theodor Marx”). Werner would arrive at his studio, depositing prohibited music, books, and, as Penck became successful, bags of West German marks. In return, he would smuggle signed paintings in fictitious appearances.

Réaktor, 1990
Reaktor, 1990. Photography: Michael Werner Gallery

Réaktor, 1990

Penck wanted children to enjoy his work, despite its intellectual foundations. His felt sculptures are playful, but dozens of sketches included in this new exhibit reveal that he designed the interconnected tubes and balls with a molecular understanding of how humans altered the very building blocks of nature. This work was carried out four years after the Chernobyl disaster.

AR Penck: Systems – Felts and paints is at the Michael Werner Gallery, London, for February 19.


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Tony Williams obituary | Jazz https://iridiumjazz.com/tony-williams-obituary-jazz/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 19:41:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/tony-williams-obituary-jazz/ Tony Williams, an old school friend of mine who died at the age of 80 from complications from Alzheimer’s disease, was a record producer, the founder of Spotlite Records and a pioneer of music appreciation. modern jazz. Born in Enfield, north London, he was the youngest son of Pip (née Fortuna) and Ronald Williams, a […]]]>

Tony Williams, an old school friend of mine who died at the age of 80 from complications from Alzheimer’s disease, was a record producer, the founder of Spotlite Records and a pioneer of music appreciation. modern jazz.

Born in Enfield, north London, he was the youngest son of Pip (née Fortuna) and Ronald Williams, a teacher. Tony attended Glendale High School in Wood Green. He left in his mid teens, having drawn inspiration from recordings by Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, and the pursuit of bebop and modern jazz became a consuming passion. He fueled this passion by working at HMV and with soul mates at Dobell’s Record Store in Charing Cross Road. This led to a Charlie Parker discography which established Tony as an authority on the man and his music.

In the pre-internet world of the 1950s, it wouldn’t have been easy to seek out the somewhat esoteric world of bebop, and it’s a tribute to Tony that he did. I was impressed when I learned that he had played chess with Gillespie in 1961, backstage at the Gaumont State Theater in Kilburn.

In 1963, I joined Tony to meet Ben Webster at the Tally Ho pub in Kentish Town, when Webster was in London with a touring band. It was obvious Tony was at home in this rarefied world. At that time he was living with his French wife Francine (née Mouleux), whom he married in 1963, and their young son, Laurence, in Winchmore Hill, before moving to Harlow, Essex.

Charlie Parker on Dial, 1940s recordings reissued on Tony Williams’ Spotlite Records in 1968. After the success of the reissues, Tony gave a portion of the profits to Parker’s widow

Tony formed a relationship with Ross Russell in California, the record producer who founded Dial Records in the 1940s, under which the Parker label had made some of their most important recordings. Russell offered him the rights to Dial’s originals, which were almost forgotten.

This is what prompted Tony to create Spotlite Records. The name comes from a New York club associated with Parker. Interest in bebop was at an all-time low at the time and this friendship with Tony encouraged Russell to complete his definitive Parker biography, Bird Lives. When Clint Eastwood was shooting his movie Bird, his studio contacted Tony for advice on Parker’s music.

The launch of Spotlite in 1968 was based on the “Charlie Parker on Dial” recordings. After the success of Parker’s reissues, Tony left for France to find Parker’s widow, Chan, to give him a portion of the profits.

The 70s and 80s were good years for Spotlite, with a growing catalog of CDs and cassettes as well as vinyl records. Tony’s networking has allowed notable musicians to enjoy the hospitality at his home and at Francine’s in Harlow, including Joe Albany, Cecil Payne, Al Haig, JR Monterose and Red Rodney. Tony also built many other friendships and recording sessions were held with prominent British musicians including Don Rendell, Pete King, Brian Dee, Elaine Delmar and many more.

After his marriage ended in divorce, Tony met Stephanie Coward, with whom he had a son, Gabriel. Stéphanie died in 2019.

Tony is survived by Laurence and Gabriel.


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Jazz greats Kirk Whalum, Chris Standring and Jason Rebello present new “Ultimate” gaming app https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-greats-kirk-whalum-chris-standring-and-jason-rebello-present-new-ultimate-gaming-app/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 13:33:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-greats-kirk-whalum-chris-standring-and-jason-rebello-present-new-ultimate-gaming-app/ LONDON, 23 December 2021 / PRNewswire / – LondonUK Music Apps Ltd, based in UK, today launched the ‘Ultimate Play Along’ app for iPad and iPhone: Jazz300 offers more than 300 professional jazz, blues, soul, funk and pop backing tracks for musicians who practice and improvise. Jazz300 ultimate gaming app for iPhone and iPad. Over […]]]>

LONDON, 23 December 2021 / PRNewswire / – LondonUK Music Apps Ltd, based in UK, today launched the ‘Ultimate Play Along’ app for iPad and iPhone: Jazz300 offers more than 300 professional jazz, blues, soul, funk and pop backing tracks for musicians who practice and improvise.

All-new app gives musicians of all skill levels the ability to play a vast collection of tracks – including over 200 jazz standards – recorded by 21 of the world’s best musicians, including 12 GRAMMY® nominees Kirk whalum (Whitney houston, Luther vandross), seven times Billboard # 1 Chris standring and jazz manager Jason rebello (Prick, Jeff Beck).

In addition to its enormous musical content, Jazz300 takes advantage of the latest advances in mobile audio technology. Users can change the tone of the track on the fly and speed up or slow down music seamlessly with just one touch.

Animated chord charts and crystal clear chord diagrams (for piano, guitar and ukulele) help users learn new chords and improve their skills. There is an option to remove solo instruments – allowing users to play their own solo over them, and the ability to create multiple playlists.

Paul Sissons, the executive producer said: “Jazz300 offers a unique source of musical accompaniment. There is not only a wide variety of real musical content that has been performed by world-class musicians, but the degree to which you can tailor each backing track in terms of key and tempo – while still maintaining the quality of the audio – is truly something new. “

The content of Jazz300 is offered to users on a “royalty-free” basis allowing them to play it anywhere and also to use elements of the content in their own musical works – for commercial or other purposes. Tracks can easily be exported from the app as stereo files, but users who want to remix, rework, or develop further Jazz300 tracks have the option to download the multitrack version of any track. This is delivered to them in the form of a GarageBand (Apple) project allowing access to the separate musical parts. This export option is available as a $ 0.99 (£ 0.99) in-app purchase.

Jazz300 is available on the Apple App Store at $ 15.99 (£ 13.99).

For press inquiries, please contact Paul Sissons
[email protected]
+44 7790909096

Notes to Editors
Jazz300 Website: https://www.jazz300.com

SOURCE UK Music Apps Ltd


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Brighten It Up – The Holiday Season – Just A Little | Community https://iridiumjazz.com/brighten-it-up-the-holiday-season-just-a-little-community/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/brighten-it-up-the-holiday-season-just-a-little-community/ By Tim Smith The @Home edition “… and in all the arts, it is training which brings art to perfection. (M. Twain) I had a lot of fun earlier this week at my Rotary meeting – but first, a little bit ahead of the information. During the latter part of the year, I began to […]]]>

By Tim Smith

The @Home edition

“… and in all the arts, it is training which brings art to perfection. (M. Twain)

I had a lot of fun earlier this week at my Rotary meeting – but first, a little bit ahead of the information.

During the latter part of the year, I began to broaden my musical horizons by benefiting from the work of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (LCJO), under the direction of Wynton Marsalis.

Where to start, especially when you relish the opportunity to hear the best musicians of the genre bring original and experimental masterpieces to a global audience. Yes, they even reach Texas.

All kidding aside, we are fortunate to have these streaming services.

Everything revolves around music, even the Wikipedia site offers very little superfluous information:

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra is an American big band and jazz orchestra conducted by Wynton Marsalis. . . “In 1988, the Orchestra was formed as an extension of its concert series, Classical Jazz, under the direction of David Berger. When Wynton Marsalis became artistic director in 1991, he emphasized the history of jazz, especially Duke Ellington. The first album was Portraits by Ellington (1992), and seven years later Ellington’s centenary was honored with the album Live in Swing City: Swingin ‘with the Duke (1999). Under Marsalis’s direction, the group performed at his home at Lincoln Center, toured the United States and abroad, visited schools, appeared on television, and performed with symphony orchestras. The orchestra supported Wynton Marsalis on his Pulitzer Prize winning album Blood on the Fields.

Back to Music: I invite you to log on to YouTube and let this music begin. I particularly like three of the LCJO concerts, and to start, or to refresh yourself, check them out:

The music of Miles Davis / Untamed Elegance, and top of my list: Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra at the BBC Proms – 2004. There are a few solo spots in the latter that will stop you in your tracks, no pun intended. . I savor every note as I type it for you.

An interesting feature of the YouTube service is that you can enjoy unique acts and get a glimpse of different instruments and the artists who bring them to life. You will have a great time.

Back to that Rotary lunch.

After carrying out our normal activities over lunch, we moved to the cinema / concert hall next door, in fact in the same building, where we were taken on a ‘plus’ holiday excursion into the world of jazz. by musicians from a local high school.

There was excellence on so many levels here; of mastery of the instruments, of “oneness” with the orchestrations, and they played for the entire 30 minutes allotted to them.

This respect for time is one of the main indicators that they have been well trained. And it just got better. It is more than obvious that they are treated like professionals and that they have lived up to these expectations. At the end of the day, you have art, not just a school “homework”.

What made this event more rewarding was the fact, and we learned from the director of the group, that in the structure of a jazz work there will be improvisation – expected and desired.

In fact, the musician who kisses a solo will, by and large, compose while he plays, then, and here is the art, has to find his way back so that the others can jump without losing the overall tempo, the texture – and most important, the spirit of work.

Not bad for a lunchtime holiday event.

So proud of today’s youth, they just aren’t getting the credit they not only deserve, but have earned. Continue to support those you meet as they grow in their craft, and maybe one day you’ll see them in London sitting with those setting the bar before them.

Postscript: It was fun to hear what some of the graduates will be taking over the coming year, and only a few were going to continue their music studies. One can only imagine what others will bring to the tables – creatively. Hence the power of music education.

A colleague works at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum on the Southern Methodist University (SMU) campus, and at a recent rally he had the honor of meeting and shaking hands with the former president. . When he retired, my friend – a dedicated teacher – taught American history.

Enjoy “Seeing You” in The Democrat’s “E” Edition.

Remember there is always an opening night.

t A s

[For EFA-62]

(This is the @ Home edition of Where A r [ts] You? – Since 5/2020)


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This year’s Baby Grand Jazz series at the Hartford Library returns to live performances https://iridiumjazz.com/this-years-baby-grand-jazz-series-at-the-hartford-library-returns-to-live-performances/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 22:12:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/this-years-baby-grand-jazz-series-at-the-hartford-library-returns-to-live-performances/ The Hartford Public Library has announced the performers for its 2022 Baby Grand Jazz series and will return to live performances after switching to streaming only last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The influential local jazz series, one of the library’s most popular programs, will consist of 17 concerts that will take place between […]]]>

The Hartford Public Library has announced the performers for its 2022 Baby Grand Jazz series and will return to live performances after switching to streaming only last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The influential local jazz series, one of the library’s most popular programs, will consist of 17 concerts that will take place between January 2 and April 24 at the Contemporary Culture Center of the Main Library downtown on Sunday. afternoon at 3 p.m. in front of a small audience. . There is no concert on Easter Sunday April 17, but otherwise there is a show every week.

The concerts will also be broadcast live. The series found an international audience of thousands of viewers for the concerts broadcast live.

This is the 19th year of Baby Grand Jazz, which features jazz artists who have a connection to Hartford but who in most cases also have regional, national and / or international followers.

“We are thrilled to be able to offer a live music experience in person this year and look forward to continuing to foster community and connections for music lovers in the Hartford area,” said Liz Castle, Program and Events Manager at the Hartford. Hartford Public Library.

Admission is free, but registration is required for in-person seats, as are masks. The feeds can be found on the library Facebook pages and Youtube channel. You can find more information on the 2022 Baby Grand Jazz series at hplct.org. The library is located at 500 Main Street in Hartford.

The season

January 2: The eclectic soul / jazz / modern duo SOAR, whose band name means “Sounds of A&R”, featuring singer April May Webb and trumpeter Randall Haywood.

January 9: New Haven trumpeter Joshua Bruneau, who toured Europe with Curtis Fuller and recorded with the Ken Fowser Quintet and Steve Davis.

January 16: Singer-songwriter Dana Lauren, who performed with Arturo Sandoval and produced an album.

January 23: Quartet 95, a ten-year-old ensemble named after the Interstate Highway.

January 30: Multicultural Boston group Noah y Maurizio, who incorporate folk and Brazilian sounds into their acoustic sets.

February 6: Bebop and traditional pianist Emery Austin Smith, a longtime Hartford resident who last performed the Baby Grand series in 2019.

February 13: Versatile drummer Trevor Davis with his Jazz Affair combo. Davis grew up playing with Connecticut legends such as Michael Bolton, GE Smith, and the band Fountainhead. He also starred in Dixieland acts.

February 20: Connecticut native and saxophonist Colin Walters with his quartet. Walters has performed with the Funky Dawgz Brass Band, the New London Big Band, and several state symphony orchestras.

February 27: Mary DiPaola Trio, with acclaimed bassist / conductor / educator Nat Reeves. DiPaolo (a pianist) and Reeves both taught at Hartt School. The Mary DiPaolo trio last performed the Baby Grand series in 2019.

March 6: The DeChamplain / Anick Quartet, with pianist Matt DeChamplain of Hartford and violinist Jason Anick of Boston. The quartet pays tribute to composers and performers such as John Coltrane, Horace Silver, Stéphane Grappelli and Oscar Peterson.

March 13: Carl Testa’s Sway. The local mainstay of experimental jazz, Testa is the production director of the pre-jazz studio and listening room Firehouse 12 in New Haven and the director of publishing and creative technology for the Tri-Centric Foundation. of great jazz Anthony Braxton.

March 20th: Pianist Mike Carabello, who studied at the Jackie McLean Institute of Jazz, and his trio.

March 27: Uruguayan pianist Nando Michelin, who lives and teaches in Massachusetts, alongside Brazilian bassist Ebinho Cardoso, who creates jazz scores to the poetry of João Cabral de Melo Neto.

April 3: The Sherry Winston Group. Revered jazz flautist Winston has been inducted into the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame. She last appeared in the Baby Grand series in 2017.

April 10: Singer / songwriter Allegra Levy, whose latest album “Lose My Number” was released in 2020.

April 17, Easter Sunday: no show

April 24: Ronnie Burrage and the holographic principle. Jazz / funk / soul drummer / keyboardist Burrage has recorded with Hamiet Bluiett, Jack Walrath, the World Saxophone Quartet and many more.

Christopher Arnott can be contacted at carnott@courant.com.


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2021 Jazz Albums Tour with Chris Searle https://iridiumjazz.com/2021-jazz-albums-tour-with-chris-searle/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 14:39:25 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/2021-jazz-albums-tour-with-chris-searle/ OF ALL the jazz albums that burst in 2021, my favorite is They’re all on that old road (Ogun Records), recorded in London in 1976, and starring two late protean masters, saxophonist Elton Dean, the son of the Salvation Army pillars of Nottingham, and pianist Keith Tippett, whose father was a policeman from Bristol. Surprising […]]]>

OF ALL the jazz albums that burst in 2021, my favorite is They’re all on that old road (Ogun Records), recorded in London in 1976, and starring two late protean masters, saxophonist Elton Dean, the son of the Salvation Army pillars of Nottingham, and pianist Keith Tippett, whose father was a policeman from Bristol.

Surprising jazz origins perhaps, but from such roots arose their distinct musical genius, and playing in a quartet with British bassist Chris Lawrence and Cape Louis Drums supremo Moholo-Moholo, they created a record of a powerful and historic dynamism.

Dean combines an extraordinary attack on the opening Edeeupub and Dede-Bup-Bup with a tender lyricism on ballads like Nancy with the Laughing Face and Naima de Coltrane.

Tippett’s keyboard flourishes and the starburst solo seems tied to Dean’s streaming alto horn and saxello, Lawrence plays with deep and touching artistry and the brilliantly inventive Moholo-Moholo brings and mixes Africa in this live mix of London.

The quartet transforms a song associated with Billie Holiday, Easy Living, into a free hymn of enormous excitement. Here, the spirits of musical heroes of the past unite in a haunting session of sonic wonders.

Daniel Herskedal is a tuba and bass trumpet virtuoso, born in Molde, Norway, in 1982.

His Call for winter (Edition Records) is a solo masterpiece, an evocation of the Scandinavian winter played with fertile artistry and a deep feeling, as if jazz is looking for new origins.

Herskedal’s lucid notes wrap around Lynx Tracks and in Glacier Hiking he emits a sound so unique that the northern skies resonate with the depth of his breath.

In Ice Crystals, he duets with his over-doubled self in a blue blizzard of haunting, chilling stamps. Amazing music, superbly played.

Slowly (Sunnyside Records) is Noah Haidu’s 75th birthday tribute to stellar pianist Keith Jarrett, forced into retirement by illness after decades of groundbreaking solo and trio performances.

Haidu plays alongside griots and jazz pioneers; bassist Buster Williams and drummer Billy Hart.

It is an album of lyrical beauty, sometimes borrowed, and Jarrett’s pianist, struck by the blow, lucidly continues in the art and the instrumental emotion of his heir.

Williams composed the serene levitating Air Dancing and Hart the shrill Duchess and the fascinating Lorca, a tribute to the great playwright.

Jarrett’s love for standards is reflected in the trio’s optimism in their evocative versions of What a Difference a Day Made, Georgia and But Beautiful.

But it’s when Haidu ties together two tunes, knitted together by the rhythmic compulsion of Williams and Hart – Jarrett’s Rainbow and his own Keith Jarrett, that this album finds its most inspired and profound moments, as if two pianists were just doing it. ‘a.

A resonant drum solo by Jim Bashford opens Woody Shaw’s Zoltan, the first track from the Xhosa Cole Quartet’s debut album, Know them, Know us (Stoney Lane Records).

Here are four sizzling young minds in great shape, with the incisive trumpet of Jay Phelps, the assured and grounded tenor saxophone of Cole and the dancing bass of James Owston.

Let’s move on to the Blues Connotation of Ornette with the full vocals of Phelps’ horn and the warm tone of Cole to the familiar melody of Rogers and Hart of Manhattan with guest pianist Reuben James.

Born in Birmingham, Cole knows and blows all about city life with his city buddy James and compatriot Brummie-horn Soweto Kinch whose alto saxophone joins us, with solos on On a Misty Night by Tadd Dameron and the Lee Morgan extravaganza, Untitled Boogaloo.

But for me, the pinnacle of the album is the quartet’s interpretation of Monk’s Played Twice, with its sudden bursts of booming Cole and Phelps notes: a bubbling sonic preface through 2022.


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