Uk – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:41:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Uk – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 Jazz standards to accompany the classic silent film – Steyning Jazz Club https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-standards-to-accompany-the-classic-silent-film-steyning-jazz-club/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:41:05 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-standards-to-accompany-the-classic-silent-film-steyning-jazz-club/ In what may be a first for Steyning Jazz Club, the club’s presentation on Friday December 2 will be Buster Plays Buster, a show devised by London jazz drummer Buster Birch which debuted in March 2011 and involves the Buster Birch Quartet performing live jazz standards at a screening of a classic Buster Keaton silent […]]]>

In what may be a first for Steyning Jazz Club, the club’s presentation on Friday December 2 will be Buster Plays Buster, a show devised by London jazz drummer Buster Birch which debuted in March 2011 and involves the Buster Birch Quartet performing live jazz standards at a screening of a classic Buster Keaton silent film.

Buster Keaton and Buster Birch

Club spokesman Colin Jilks said: “The music was arranged for the band, recorded and synced to the film, but also features many improvised solos from the musicians. This creates a cohesive work that merges the two art forms into a single experience for the audience. The film will be 1928’s Steamboat Bill Jr and the quartet line-up will be Jo Fooks, sax; Neil Casey, piano; Pete Ringrose, bass; and Buster Birch, drums. This Buster Plays Buster presentation is undoubtedly one of those occasions that will be remembered long after the last note has been played. Previous audiences were not only thrilled and utterly captivated by music of such quality and sensitivity, but also by the cinematic enhancement of the music.

“Drummer Buster Birch was greatly inspired by Buster Keaton’s 1921 two-reel film The Playhouse and later arranged the score for 1928’s Steamboat Bill Jr. Since debuting in March 2011, Buster Plays Buster has delighted audiences with his magic and its charm.Jazz fans thoroughly enjoyed this well-produced show, which features a first-class jazz quartet of the highest caliber of musicians performing live to enhance Buster Keaton’s classic silent film.

“The bar is supplied by Riverside Brewery and mince pies will be served to further heighten the Christmas spirit; doors open at 7:15 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. The Steyning Jazz Club meets at the Steyning Centre, Fletcher’s Croft, Steyning. BN44 3XZ. Information Colin Jilks Tel: 01903 810395.

Buster Birch is an award-winning drummer from London who has worked with many of the UK‘s finest jazz musicians. He holds an honors degree in music from the University of London and a post-graduate diploma in jazz performance.

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Jazz supergroup AZIZA dazzles at Cadogan Hall https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-supergroup-aziza-dazzles-at-cadogan-hall/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 17:25:18 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-supergroup-aziza-dazzles-at-cadogan-hall/ The notion of a “supergroup,” whether in rock, jazz, or any other form of music, conjures up images of clashing egos, competitive play, and ultimate collapse; not to mention disappointment and bathos if the individual elements don’t completely gel. Long-time jazz supergroup Aziza are different. The Members – Bass Legend david hollandtop tier sax ace […]]]>

The notion of a “supergroup,” whether in rock, jazz, or any other form of music, conjures up images of clashing egos, competitive play, and ultimate collapse; not to mention disappointment and bathos if the individual elements don’t completely gel. Long-time jazz supergroup Aziza are different. The Members – Bass Legend david hollandtop tier sax ace Chris Pottermaster drummer Eric Harland and guitar/vocal virtuoso Lionel Loueke – would certainly qualify for membership in any supergroup agglomeration, but this is a more democratic and organic endeavour; each member can shine, each has the chance to show off their composition abilities. Plus, these virtuosos clearly enjoy each other’s musical company, and they play with against each other rather than against. And while Holland is by far the most prominent member and takes center stage more often than most bassists, he’s not a catch-all. In this set, each member is a star.

It was difficult to pick out the highlights of Aziza’s two-hour show, as every moment was an absorbing masterclass of improvisational music-making, marred only by the Cadogan’s slightly toppy acoustics. But among the six tracks, Holland’s “Another Land”, Potter’s “Blue Sufi” (featuring the saxophonist tapping out a rhythm with the keys of his horn, a supple bass workout and Loueke’s explosive guitar solo) , Harland’s tender ballad “Friends” and “Loueke “Sleepless Nights”, with its brilliant riffs between saxophonist and guitarist, stood out. It’s complex music made by musicians at the top of their game, but it’s still extremely accessible and played with energy and emotion.

An extra nod too, for Loueke (above), who really is something quite special. His ability to switch between Burrell’s jazz riff, tapped percussive harmonics, rock bomb and Herbie-esque synth guitar; as well as his remarkable vocal abilities (beautiful wordless singing punctuated with Xhosa-style clicks), are all something to behold. Dave’s tribute to the late John Cumming, one of the founders and entertainers of the London Jazz Festival, was also a nice touch and drew a round of applause from the grateful audience.

If you’re looking for a supergroup that really gels, then check out Aziza. Next time they visit the UK be sure to book a ticket… you’re in for a treat.

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Sarathy Korwar: Kalak review – skillful musical storytelling | Jazz https://iridiumjazz.com/sarathy-korwar-kalak-review-skillful-musical-storytelling-jazz/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/sarathy-korwar-kalak-review-skillful-musical-storytelling-jazz/ On his last album, 2019 More arrivalthe American-born, Indian-raised drummer and producer Sarathy Korwar showed great talent for thoughtful and engaging musical storytelling. Kalak is the London-based artist’s fourth album as a bandleader, and finds it less searing, more meditative than on its predecessor – but still just as vital. Examining the double meaning of […]]]>

On his last album, 2019 More arrivalthe American-born, Indian-raised drummer and producer Sarathy Korwar showed great talent for thoughtful and engaging musical storytelling. Kalak is the London-based artist’s fourth album as a bandleader, and finds it less searing, more meditative than on its predecessor – but still just as vital.

Examining the double meaning of the Hindi and Urdu word “kal” (which is both “yesterday” and “tomorrow”), Kalak unfolds with questions such as: who needs to be reminded; how to do more than just survive in the present; how to dream about the future? In the hands of a lesser artist, the concept might border on the didactic or the sickening (and certainly, the spoken word elements on the opening A Recipe to Cure Historical Amnesia seem skippable on repeated listening), but the compositions of Korwar here are irresistible.

Filtered through electronic artist Photay’s atmospheric output, there’s undulating flute patterns that gleam in and out of tune, sax moans, synth waves and of course the alluring, in-tune urgency. loop Korwar’s percussion, keeping time while pushing beyond its limits on tracks like That Clocks Don’t Tell But Make Time. A skillful and warm album that anchors the listener while inspiring them to think bigger.

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Langtoun Jazz ends its 2022 lineup with a concert by Colin Steele https://iridiumjazz.com/langtoun-jazz-ends-its-2022-lineup-with-a-concert-by-colin-steele/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 04:55:58 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/langtoun-jazz-ends-its-2022-lineup-with-a-concert-by-colin-steele/ He will lead an all-star quintet through some favorite standards at the Old Kirk, Kirkcaldy on Saturday 26 November. Steele has been described as the Sibelius of Scotland. His music is a joyous celebration of Scottish melody and rhythm, liberated and enhanced by the spirit, sophistication and technique of jazz. He worked with Hue and […]]]>

He will lead an all-star quintet through some favorite standards at the Old Kirk, Kirkcaldy on Saturday 26 November.

Steele has been described as the Sibelius of Scotland. His music is a joyous celebration of Scottish melody and rhythm, liberated and enhanced by the spirit, sophistication and technique of jazz.

He worked with Hue and Cry in the 1990s, living in France, Italy and London, and released his own folk-inspired albums to huge critical acclaim.

Colin Steele Quintet

His more recent albums have included jazz treatments of songs by Davie Scott of The Pearlfishers and music by Joni Mitchell. He has released four award-winning albums and is a long-time member of the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra.

The group is completed by pianist Campbell Normand, bassist Roy Percy and drummer Jim Drummond. Colin promises a joyous dive into the rich vein of jazz standards and maybe a few requests!

Grace Black, Treasurer of Langtoun Jazz, said: “Colin is of course known to Langtoun Jazz audiences after his appearance with Ali Affleck in May, but this wonderful quintet gives him a vehicle to explore all his favorite standards from decades of jazz. . He is one of Scotland’s most versatile jazz musicians and this concert will delight music lovers of all ages and tastes.

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Live jazz at Pangbourne features a top-flight trombonist https://iridiumjazz.com/live-jazz-at-pangbourne-features-a-top-flight-trombonist/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/live-jazz-at-pangbourne-features-a-top-flight-trombonist/ JAZZ trombonist Mark Nightingale is a guest at the Pangbourne Jazz Club on Sunday night, backed by the club’s rhythm section Terry Hutchins (guitar) | Andy Crowdy (double bass) Jim Pollard (piano) and Brian Greene (drums). Entry is £10 (online or at the door), there’s a cheap bar, public parking and it’s a 7.30pm departure. […]]]>

JAZZ trombonist Mark Nightingale is a guest at the Pangbourne Jazz Club on Sunday night, backed by the club’s rhythm section Terry Hutchins (guitar) | Andy Crowdy (double bass) Jim Pollard (piano) and Brian Greene (drums). Entry is £10 (online or at the door), there’s a cheap bar, public parking and it’s a 7.30pm departure.

Multi-award winning musician Mark Nightingale is now a firm favorite on the UK jazz scene and has earned a reputation as one of the finest jazz trombonists in Europe and the world. He had longtime musical associations playing in bands led by John Dankworth, Cleo Laine, Stan Tracey, Kenny Wheeler, Andy Panayi, Clark Tracey and Alan Barnes over the years. He also leads various small bands and his own big band, featuring his own compositions and arrangements.

Mark is also a busy session musician in London and has performed on hundreds of film soundtracks and had the chance to perform and record with some of the greatest in all genres of music. These include Ray Brown, Clark Terry, Scott Hamilton, James Morrison, Bill Holman, Frank Sinatra, Charlie Watts, Sting and Steely Dan.

trombonist Mark Nightingale

He is best known to many young players for his growing catalog of educational studies and short pieces published by Warwick Music and widely used by the ABRSM and Trinity/Guildhall in their music examination programs.

The club, at Rosewood Hall, Whitchurch Road, Pangbourne operates every first Sunday of the month. For more information brian.greene@gigajam.com

Note that the public car park now operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, so remember to buy a ticket (enter the registration number of your vehicle at the machine). Please do not park in the members-only parking lot.

PWMC
PWMC

come next

Pangbourne Jazz Club

Andy Dickens (trumpet) & Al Nicholls (saxophones)

Simon Bates (saxophones)



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Dominic Ingham (Royal Albert Hall, Elgar Room November 3, Jazz Sanctuary November 13) – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/dominic-ingham-royal-albert-hall-elgar-room-november-3-jazz-sanctuary-november-13-london-jazz-news/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/dominic-ingham-royal-albert-hall-elgar-room-november-3-jazz-sanctuary-november-13-london-jazz-news/ Kit Downes said: ‘Dom has a unique and personal approach to improvisation that is subtle and detailed – his skills as a composer and improviser are a rare treat and should be heard live whenever possible’ The violinist’s debut album / Wakefield-born composer Dominic Ingham ‘Role Models’ has garnered attention for his probing, atmospheric, melodic […]]]>

Kit Downes said: ‘Dom has a unique and personal approach to improvisation that is subtle and detailed – his skills as a composer and improviser are a rare treat and should be heard live whenever possible’ The violinist’s debut album / Wakefield-born composer Dominic Ingham ‘Role Models’ has garnered attention for his probing, atmospheric, melodic and folk-inspired compositions. He is currently on an eleven date tour with new repertoire he has written for a (mostly) new quintet with Jonny Mansfield (vibes), Miles Mindlin (guitar), Will Sach (bass) and Jay Davis (drums). Interview with Sebastian.

London Jazz News: What drew you to the violin?

Dominique Ingham: When I was about five years old, my parents took me to a folk concert and there were lots of violins playing – huge sound. After the concert, I said “I want to learn to play the violin” and the rest is history. I got to a point when I was about 16/17 and pretty good at my instrument where I decided I wanted to play jazz – it was frustrating as I would have liked to practice on saxophone or trumpet instead of violin.

I gave it a shot – the idea was to transfer a sound I had in mind onto the violin. It was tricky at first because most of the time I didn’t like what was coming out (some of it made me want to cringe actually) but little by little I started to understand stuff that sounded good

LJN: Do you think listeners find emotion in your music?

DI: I hope they would. It’s not something I really think about. I write songs that I love and they are then transformed by the musicians who play them – a process that always fascinates me. Sometimes a track can open up to something completely different from what I had imagined – these are often my favorite moments in concert.

LJN: I notice that there are a lot of young people / your contemporaries at your concerts, at least from what there is on video… you seem to capture the mood of your contemporaries… do you feel that?

DI: Yeah! I love making music with my friends. It’s a truly joyful process, from writing to rehearsing to driving across the country to play gigs – it’s a dream come true. Jonny Mansfield (vibes) and Will Sach (bass) join me on this tour; we’ve been developing a common musical language since at least the beginning of music college, so playing together seems like second nature.

LJN: Are you teaching classical string players to improvise? Is it different with every player or do you have keys on your keychain to unlock that kind of creativity?

DI: Yes, I teach classical string players to improvise! So the idea is not necessarily that these children will become improvisers, rather it is that improvisation can be used as a tool to help them develop their skills as musicians as well as develop their already unique relationship. with the music.

LJN: Is there a theme for the new work you wrote for this tour?

DI: In the new work, I wrote quite a lot of songs in collaboration with other members of the group. It was a really interesting process because each track reflects the personality of the musicians who wrote it. It’s also cool to see each musician’s role change when they play their own piece. I’m glad we did that, because right now the band is sounding better than ever and I feel like everyone is really invested in the music.

LJN: You sometimes talk about shyness. How does that and being an artist fit together?

DI: Although I had a lot of performance opportunities when I was younger, I had a hard time getting over my nerves when I played classical music, but when I started playing jazz/ improvised music, I felt more comfortable and I was happier to be on stage. I guess I felt more comfortable expressing myself in this music, so communicating with the audience and the musicians on stage was a lot easier.

LJN: Who is this band’s oldest musical partner and how did you meet him?

DI: Jonny Mansfield and I met when we were 16 at Chetham’s School of Music. We both played jazz on “unusual” instruments, so I guess we bonded and ended up playing a lot together. Since then we’ve always been separate from each other’s projects – I can’t imagine not having him in the band because he understands my musical intentions better than anyone.

LJN: And the others?

DI: I met Will when we were both just starting out at music college – I was addicted to his sound and have been playing with him ever since. I feel like a lot of us have made a friend or two that we didn’t know before the pandemic, but are very close now – Miles is one of those friends! We have very similar musical tastes, so playing together is really exciting. I also met Jay during the pandemic and was drawn to the freedom he has on drums – super fun to interact with!

LJN: Will there be an album of this project?

DI: I have an upcoming EP called “Letters” which contains the music from this tour. Every track on the EP will be filmed live in the space we are recording (remotely). I can’t wait to share this new music with the world – both sonically and visually!

REMAINING TOUR DATES:

November 3 – Royal Albert Hall (Elgar Room), London – RESERVATIONS
November 13 – Jazz Sanctuary, Twickenham (EFG London Jazz Festival) – RESERVATIONS
December 2 – Wakefield Jazz Club

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Paul Jones (new album ‘The Blues’) – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/paul-jones-new-album-the-blues-london-jazz-news/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 12:06:10 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/paul-jones-new-album-the-blues-london-jazz-news/ The blues have been central to Paul Jones’ life for sixty years. The singer, actor, harmonica player, radio personality and TV presenter turned 80 in February. He presented his last blues show on BBC Radio in 2018 and the Blues Band, which he co-founded forty years ago, played its last gig earlier this year. He […]]]>

The blues have been central to Paul Jones’ life for sixty years. The singer, actor, harmonica player, radio personality and TV presenter turned 80 in February. He presented his last blues show on BBC Radio in 2018 and the Blues Band, which he co-founded forty years ago, played its last gig earlier this year. He has now produced a retrospective albumThe Blues – link to review below. Interview conducted by Bruce Lindsay.

“I’m a bit surprised to be interviewed by London Jazz News,” says Paul Jones as we begin our interview, “I don’t see myself quite in the same boat as John Taylor”. At the end of the interview, the kind and knowledgeable Jones revealed the early love of jazz that led to his lifelong love of the blues.

Jones turned eighty in 2022, but that wasn’t the catalyst for his new compilation, The Blues. “The catalyst was the coronavirus, when all of my gigs suddenly disappeared… I started listing all the songs I wrote, figuring out which publisher had which songs. I thought “There is an album here”. I was already thinking of handing in my resignation to the blues band [which started over 40 years ago and played its final gig earlier this year] and I thought a blues album I’ve done over the years would be good enough. If I limited myself to things that I had written or co-written, then it would be more of a picture of me, so to speak. That’s how the album was born.

Jones selected the songs, and programmed the album following an intervention by Stephen Fernie, from the Jones Umbrella Music label. ‘5, 4, 3, 2, 1’ by Manfred Mann, the theme song for a pop TV show On your marks, ready? leave, was going to be the opening track, but Fernie told him ‘You can’t start a blues album with “5, 4, 3, 2, 1”, you can slip it in later.’ ‘I said “But Steve, it’s a blues!” You can argue with a few changes, but that’s the blues. It started life as a 12 bar and was moved around a bit, to meet the demands of On your marks, ready? leave for a new signature song. It only became a single afterwards.

The album begins with “Without You”, which Manfred Man recorded in late 1963 and which, as Jones says, “is unmistakably blues”. Initially, he thought of scheduling the album chronologically, but that would have meant putting the seven Manfred Mann tracks at the start, followed by a mix of solo and Blues Band tracks: “So I thought I’d take a song by Manfreds, a Solo and a Blues Band and run the whole album in that order and it works perfectly.

Jones’ love of the blues grew out of jazz. “There were two boys in the year above me at school, when I was about fourteen. One of them asked if we had any records and I said ‘yes, we have Tchaikovsky, Brahms’. He said “No, do you personally have any?” I hadn’t. Her friends recommended Percy Faith and Jo Stafford. Jones found nothing there to his liking, but bought a Nat King Cole record and a Sammy Davis record, on which Davis posed as singers and actors. ‘A few weeks later these guys told me I should buy some jazz records and gave me a book, believe it or not, Rex Harris’s Jazz … Harris’s enthusiasm for New Orleans music was contagious and I bought a 78 from King Oliver’s band with Louis Armstrong on second cornet, “Dippermouth Blues”. It was wonderful. I bought a King Oliver’s Jazz Band LP and a track, not a blues, called “Mabel’s Dream” just blew my hair. I still can’t listen to it without a similar reaction. I discovered that my favorite records were the vocal records, the blues of people like Jelly Roll Morton or Bessie Smith. They caught me in a way that Buddy Holly or Elvis just didn’t. The real blues, like Jimmy Rushing with Count Basie, absolutely grabbed me.

Jones’ father, a Royal Navy officer, was posted to Plymouth Dockyard in 1960-61. Jones was in his first year at Oxford when the family moved to Plymouth and when he first returned home he discovered Pete Russell’s Hot Record Store. The title impressed him: “Store! It looks really cool. One day he played T-Bone Walker, a record made in Chicago for Atlantic Records. Junior Wells played harmonica on two tracks including “Play on Little Girl”… Wells’ playing is relatively simple but beautiful and I thought “God, can you do that with a mouth organ? I bought a mouth organ, and of course I couldn’t do that with it.

Luckily, Brian Jones, later of the Rolling Stones, was on hand. “Brian taught me how to play the cross harp, taking a harmonica in C and playing it in G, for example. This is the first step to playing as Little Walter. It opened the door, it was me running.

The Blues features many legendary British musicians: “The Dog Presides” features Jones and Paul Samwell-Smith of the Yardbirds on bass, Jeff Beck on guitar and Paul McCartney on drums; Eric Clapton plays guitar on ‘Choose or Cop Out’; Alan Skidmore, Guy Barker and a host of other high-flying jazzers appear on ‘It’s Got to be the Blues’ – but the album’s most moving track, to me, is ‘Sonny Boy Williamson’, the tribute from Jones to the second Sonny Boy, a major blues figure with a fearsome reputation who died in 1965. It’s a duet performance, recorded in 1966, with Jones on vocals and harmonica, and Jack Bruce on double bass.

“I loved Sonny Boy, though that wasn’t all he was about. He was very subtle compared to a lot of the ‘smack you in the teeth’ blues singers. His writing was wonderful, ‘Mighty Long Time’ was one of the most influential records of my life When he died I had to write a tribute song ‘Mighty Long Time’ is just Sonny Boy and a bass – I found out years after I wrote the tribute that it was not a double bass, but a bass voice. I asked Jack if he would agree to join me on the song… I think it went pretty well. I think the The word ‘banal’ was used by one reviewer, but it’s actually simple and heartfelt. As he left the studio, Jack, bless him, said ‘Well, that made me cry.’

Jones briefly met Williamson when Manfred Mann was booked as a backing band for some UK gigs. “It was around 1963, before we had any hits. We did maybe a show or two and then he got rid of us. No arguments, no acrimony, but the whole band except me was deciphered jazz musicians and there was a difference of opinion between the Manfreds and Sonny Boy as to how many bars there are in a 12 bar blues. That’s all it was.

When Jones stopped presenting his blues show on Radio 2, “Mighty Long Time” was the last song he played. “I decided that, as this was my last program, I was going to end with probably my favorite blues track of all time.” And that was it.

CONNECTIONS: review of The Blues

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Three concerts in Philadelphia show the reinvention of contemporary jazz https://iridiumjazz.com/three-concerts-in-philadelphia-show-the-reinvention-of-contemporary-jazz/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 09:13:24 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/three-concerts-in-philadelphia-show-the-reinvention-of-contemporary-jazz/ The concept of jazz for some is frozen in an eternal bebop era, with men in suits playing swinging beats in smoky nightclubs. Audiences looking for an update can find three vibrant examples of the genre’s most contemporary developments in Philadelphia this week. On Wednesday October 19, it’s hard to choose between drummer Antonio Sánchez […]]]>

The concept of jazz for some is frozen in an eternal bebop era, with men in suits playing swinging beats in smoky nightclubs.

Audiences looking for an update can find three vibrant examples of the genre’s most contemporary developments in Philadelphia this week. On Wednesday October 19, it’s hard to choose between drummer Antonio Sánchez and his band Bad Hombre at World Café Live, and British trio The Comet Is Coming at Underground Arts. On Thursday, October 20, irreverent jazz prodigy duo DOMi & JD Beck will perform The Foundry at The Fillmore.

Impossible to deny Antonio Sánchez’s jazz good faith. Reached via Zoom last week, he was in Mexico to wrap up a world tour with guitar great Pat Metheny. He has also recorded with legends such as Chick Corea and Gary Burton. But Sánchez’s 2017 album bad man saw the drummer-composer embark on a new path, partly inspired by his acclaimed drum score for Alejandro González Iñarritu’s Oscar-winning film birdman.

“The way I see jazz these days is like the tool that gives me the freedom to do something that defies categorization,” Sánchez said. “I feel like the role of an artist is one of constant growth and inner searching, and I hope that hunger for doing more and doing different things doesn’t stop anytime soon.”

Sampled elements from the albums will mingle with live improvisation when Sánchez performs at the World Cafe. His band Bad Hombre includes his wife, vocalist Thana Alexa, as well as Japanese keyboardist/producer BIGYUKI and Australian bassist/programmer Lex Sadler, each of whom mix jazz and disparate influences. The combination allows Sánchez to create a malleable approach that defies easy categorization.

“Jazz has always been somewhat marginal,” he explained, “and after the pandemic, I feel like what was big before is bigger now and what was small before is smaller now. I try to think outside the box a bit and imprint my knowledge of jazz into those projects that have influences of rock, pop, hip-hop, reggae, etc. But it wouldn’t sound like that if it didn’t. didn’t have all the nuances that I acquired during my years as a jazz artist.

At only 22 and 19 years old respectively, the keyboard-drums duo composed of DOMi and JD Beck use all the tools at their generational disposal. They walk between the jazz tradition and contemporary pop, which is good since their first album, Not tightwas jointly released by venerable jazz label Blue Note and Anderson .Paak’s Apeshit brand.

Long before releasing an album, the duo had amassed a following with their YouTube videos, which mix dizzying, virtuoso renditions of jazz standards with boyish humor and stunning outfits that could serve as camouflage in a candy store. The duo reached out to an elusive young audience with music that’s not that far off from late jazz fusion once you clear out the social media-ready trappings. And they received the imprimatur of at least one jazz icon: legendary keyboardist Herbie Hancock.

Danalogue, The Comet Is Coming’s synthesizer/producer (also known as Dan Leavers), cites Hancock as a touchstone for his style-changing trio. “The way Herbie has evolved throughout his career is just amazing,” he said by phone from the band’s Chicago tour stop.

“He was comfortable having a killer riff and a killer drumbeat and then creating these open spaces, these sonic universes in which to express and communicate with each other as a group. [In the same way]we bring together a new set of instruments in an ensemble to express ourselves.

The Comet Is Coming is representative of a thriving London jazz scene that has captured the attention of international audiences in recent years. The trio is made up of Danalogue, drummer Betamax (Max Hallett) and saxophonist King Shabaka (Shabaka Hutchings, who also leads bands Sons of Kemet and Shabaka and the Ancestors). The band’s shows are high-octane affairs that feel more grounded in dance music than jazz (Danalogue and Betamax also collaborate as electronic duo Soccer96).

Their fourth album, Hyper-Dimensional Expansion Beam, was recorded in Peter Gabriel’s Real World studio where the trio improvised together, after which Danalogue and Betamax sorted through the recordings to select and reshape the best material. “People think of improvisation as just creating random stuff,” Danalogue said. “But once you know your method of composing is based on spontaneous composing, in your head you’re half writing while you play… The three of us are on a crazy wavelength together, so we bond often quite well.”

While it’s impossible to identify The Comet Is Coming or any of these artists with just one genre, Danalogue sees this fluidity as a debt to the inspiration, if not the literal sound, of jazz.

“Where we intersect with jazz is in the spirit of creating and searching for a new sound,” he said. “When a lot of people think of jazz, they think of Miles Davis” kind of blueor John Coltrane blue train, or Duke Ellington. But if you actually look at the jazz arc, you see a genre that is constantly reinventing itself.

  • Antonio Sanchez and Bad Hombre play at World Cafe Live, 8 p.m. Oct. 19, 3025 Walnut St., Phila. For tickets, visit worldcafelive.com

  • The comet is coming plays Underground Arts, 8:30 p.m. Oct. 19 with Salami Rose Joe Louis, 1200 Callowhill St., Phila. For tickets, visit undergroundarts.org

  • DOMi & JD Beck play The Foundry at The Fillmore, 8 p.m. Oct. 20, 29 E. Allen St., Phila. For tickets, visit thefillmorephilly.com

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‘Indo-jazz fusions revisited’. (November 16, 2022 EFG LJF) – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/indo-jazz-fusions-revisited-november-16-2022-efg-ljf-london-jazz-news/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/indo-jazz-fusions-revisited-november-16-2022-efg-ljf-london-jazz-news/ Come full circle… the Royal Academy of Music’s jazz department has invited sitar player Jonathan Mayer to celebrate ‘Indo-Jazz Fusions’, the pioneering 1960s band that was co-led by Jonathan’s father, the Calcutta-born composer John Mayer, and jazz saxophonist Joe Harriott. The concert marks 70 years since the autumn of 1952, when John Mayer (1930-2004) came […]]]>

Come full circle… the Royal Academy of Music’s jazz department has invited sitar player Jonathan Mayer to celebrate ‘Indo-Jazz Fusions’, the pioneering 1960s band that was co-led by Jonathan’s father, the Calcutta-born composer John Mayer, and jazz saxophonist Joe Harriott.

The concert marks 70 years since the autumn of 1952, when John Mayer (1930-2004) came to England on a scholarship to study composition and violin at the Academy. He then worked professionally in London as an orchestral violinist for over a decade, while developing an interest as a composer in finding common threads between jazz, classical music and the music of his country. of birth. His contribution to music is unique. Interview with Jonathan Mayer by Sebastian Scotney.

Joe Harriott and John Mayer, 1966. Photo from the personal collection of Jonathan Mayer.

London Jazz News: Should we consider Indo Jazz Fusions as a group… an album… or a movement?

Jonathan Mayer: I would say it started as a concept that formed a band that created albums and ended up creating a movement. Indo-Jazz Fusion (or simply Indo-Jazz) is now a genre and it all stems from Indo-Jazz Fusions, the 1966 band

LJN: According to you, what are the common threads that your father found between jazz, classical composition and Indian music?

JM: The strongest common thread between jazz and Indian music is improvisation. North Indian improvisation (my father watched North Indian music and not South Indian Carnatic which is very different) is very structured and when used with rhythm (tala) takes the form of gat (composition ) around a rhythmic cycle. This gat can be considered the “head” and since there is no harmony in Indian music, they have to rely on rhythm and melody.

As my father studied Indian music, he knew how he could incorporate Indian ragas (scales) and talas (rhythms) into a jazz idiom. He also knew he could incorporate his classic songwriting style into Indo-Jazz fusions and the best example of this is the piece “Overture” where my dad uses 3 voice counterpoint.

John Mayer in 1975. Photo from the personal collection of Jonathan Mayer.

LJN: What do you think is his greatest and most enduring musical legacy?

JM: Three of my dad’s pieces really stand out.

1. Dhammapada – The EMI commissioned album telling the story of the spread of Buddhism through music, is truly an amazing album with jazz, classical, Indian and Chinese influences;

2. Six Ragamalas for solo cello – It shows how my father was able to write for Western instruments and make them sound Indian;

3. Violin Concerto No. 2 – My father’s orchestral writing at its best.

All these recordings are available on First Hand Records

Jonathan Mayer. Publicity photo

LJN: As a musician, you have a unique heritage. What led you to specialize in the sitar?

JM: I was always surrounded by music when I was a child although I must say that my parents considered music as a profession and therefore there was never singing around the piano (thank God!). Instead, I was taken on tours and gigs from an early age and learned the violin from my grandfather (on my mother’s side) and had piano lessons. I was also exposed to Indian music and by the age of 15 I had found my father’s Indo-jazz records and a tape of Dhammapada and it was this recording that made me want to learn the sitar. We have family friends who are from Kolkata and they took my first sitar from there and I started learning from Clem Alford, the sitarist of the Dhammapada registration.

More specifically on my heritage, I’m biologically half Indian and half English and I play who I am, my compositions are influenced by both cultures (like my father) and when I play the sitar I look for influences outside of the Indian classical genre.

LJN: Have you ever done the George Harrison thing and gone to learn with a grandmaster under a tree or by a fast flowing river?

JM: Ha! Nope! The funniest thing about Indian music is the western perception of it. The whole hippie movement has affected the way people in the West listen to Indian music with incense sticks burning and tie-dye worn. However, Indians see it quite differently, with taalim (training) and riyaz (practice) being very important and sometimes inculcated quite forcefully. I studied from Clem Alford, Wajahat Khan and Pandit Subroto Roy Chowdhury who all had different approaches to teaching that shaped my playing style.

LJN: You revived the band in the 1990s with your father involved. What was the story there? Hasn’t the world around you changed a lot?

JM: In the late 1980s, my father got the job of composer-in-residence at the Birmingham Conservatory, and students were extremely interested in his Indo-jazz work. He formed a band that explored compositions but there were no Indian musicians at that time. By the time I arrived at the Conservatory there were more and we were able to form the full band, which was approached by Nimbus Records to record a new version of the old band and include some new material. In total we made four new albums and toured in India, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, but when my father passed away in 2004, I just didn’t have the heart to continue with the band. I did a concert Dhammapada and Indo-Jazz materials a few years ago but nothing else since.

LJN: Tell LJN Readers About the November 16 Concert and What You’ll Be Playing

JM: November 16th will see the first time the Indo-Jazz Fusions group have played since 2002. We will be playing my father’s original compositions from the 1960s. It will be a great evening with great players from the Royal Academy of Music led by smart nick (Head of Jazz), myself on sitar and Mitel Purohit on the table.

CONNECTIONS: Guardian obituary of John Mayer

More information about the concert on November 16 on the EFG London Jazz Festival website

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Jazz music documentary about Grammy Award winner Roy ‘Hargrove’ is set for International Film Festival screenings in Seattle, New York, Dallas and London after its Tribeca premiere https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-music-documentary-about-grammy-award-winner-roy-hargrove-is-set-for-international-film-festival-screenings-in-seattle-new-york-dallas-and-london-after-its-tribeca-premiere/ Sat, 08 Oct 2022 16:45:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-music-documentary-about-grammy-award-winner-roy-hargrove-is-set-for-international-film-festival-screenings-in-seattle-new-york-dallas-and-london-after-its-tribeca-premiere/ HARGROVE, a feature documentary about the life of the famous jazz trumpeter and musical prodigy Roy Hargroverealized by Eliane Henryhas been added to several world famous film festivals in Seattle, dallas, New York Cityand London after a successful world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York Cityon June 12 2022. LOS ANGELES, October […]]]>

HARGROVE, a feature documentary about the life of the famous jazz trumpeter and musical prodigy Roy Hargroverealized by Eliane Henryhas been added to several world famous film festivals in Seattle, dallas, New York Cityand London after a successful world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York Cityon June 12 2022.

LOS ANGELES, October 8, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — HARGROVE, a truth-style documentary chronicling the last year of GRAMMY Legend of the award-winning trumpet by Roy Hargrove life, will be screened at major international film festivals United States and Europeincluding the Seattle international film festival, dallas International Film Festival, Urban World Film Festival in New York City and Doc’n Roll Film Festival in London, England.

Get information and buy tickets for upcoming “Hargrove” screenings below or by following @HargroveDocumentary on Instagram:

SEATTLE, WASHINGTONTUESDAY OCTOBER 11, 2022 at 7 p.m.Seattle International Film Festival, DocFest program – Founded in 1976, the Seattle The International Film Festival believes in the unique power of film to share original stories, diverse perspectives and rich emotional journeys. SIFF hosts its second annual DocFest program, a celebration of all documentary film, October 6-13, 2022.

SIFF Uptown Cinema
511 Queen Anne Avenue North
Seattle, WA 98109

DALLAS, TEXASSUNDAY OCTOBER 16 at 4 p.m.dallas International Film Festival – Montgomery Arts Theater on Sunday October 16 at 4 p.m. at Booker T. Washington High School for the Visual and Performing Arts which Hargrove attended in the 80s. Erykah Baduwho was executive producer of the film with Janine Sherman Barroiswill be present at the event.

Montgomery Arts Theater
at Booker T. Washington High School
for the visual and performing arts
2501 Flora Street
Dallas, TX 75201

NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORKOCTOBER 27, 2022 – Urban World Film Festival – In its 26th year, Urbanworld remains in a class of its own by creating communities and spaces where storytelling, technology and community converge. Our mission as a festival and organization continues to have urgent relevance as the storytellers and ideas featured on our festival platforms elicit the best in storytelling, technology and culture.

LONDON, ENGLANDSUNDAY 6 NOVEMBER, 5 p.m. – Doc’n Roll Film Festival – The 9th edition of the Doc’n Roll Film Festival, our November festival supported by BFI, will take place across London cinemas and 11 regional cities simultaneously from October 27 to November 13, 2022.

Barbican Cinemas
Beech Street, Barbican
London EC1Y 8AA
UK

The next screenings can be found on HargroveDocumentary.com

Filmed in the jazz clubs of New York, Los Angeles and throughout Mediterranean Europe (Vienna, Perugia, Sète, Sorrento, and Marseilles) on his last tour, HARGROVE shines the spotlight on the genius of Roy Hargrove and his enormous contributions to the art of jazz. The key conversations extend beyond Roy’s personal story and penetrate the terrain of what it means to be an artist, particularly in America. HARGROVE delves into the importance of black music in America while providing insight into the politics of power and race in the music industry. Roy’s story resonates within today’s Black Lives Matter movement with questions of ethics, exploitation and empathy being questioned.

Music icons Erykah Badu, Herbie HancockYasiin Bey, Questlove, Sonny Rollin, Wynton Marsalis, Robert Glasper, and others pay homage to Hargrove’s legacy as an acclaimed composer in HARGROVE. First Time Director Eliane Henry unveils an epic love letter to black music with a rare and personal look at an artist whose peers consider a musical prophet. HARGROVE further documents Roy’s impact on black music and his place in jazz history.

Poplife Productions presents
in association with the productions of folding chairs

HARGROVE

Produced by Eliane Henry & Dana Guerin
Executive product by Janine Sherman Barrois &
Erykah Badu

“Thanks to Henri’s perseverance, we have the amazing fusion of two talented artists, the filmmaker and the musician.” —DownBeat

“He was an incredible musician.” — Herbie Hancock

“He could hear the paint drying.” — Ralph Moore

On the occasion of the launch of the Hargrove documentary, Poplife Productions is working in collaboration with MusiCares® to raise funds in Roy’s honor.

The MusiCares Foundation provides a safety net for the music community in times of need, and together we can promote wellness, care and compassion in the lives of the next generation of musicians.

Donate to MusiCares in honor of by Roy Hargrove life and legacy at MusiCares.org

About the movie HARGROVE
HARGROVE is a truth-style documentary, chronicling the trumpet legend’s final year by Roy Hargrove life. Filmed in the jazz clubs of New York as well as across Mediterranean Europe during his last summer tour, this film highlights by Roy Hargrove enormous contribution to the art of jazz. HARGROVE exposes the dark and challenging sides of an artist pure in form, yet vulnerable to everyday realities. Music icons including Erykah Badu, Herbie HancockYasiin Bey, Questlove, Sonny Rollinand Wynton Marsalis pay tribute to the artistry, impact and legacy of Hargrove. An epic love letter from the first black director Eliane Henrythis film features great live performances from Hargrove during the last year of his life.

About the Director Eliane Henry
Eliane Henry is a black filmmaker who began her long career in Hollywood as a creative director in the music industry working for her mentor quincy jones in the 90s, then in public relations and special events as a director at Harrison & Shriftman, a multinational public relations company in the early 2000s. In 2003, Henri founded his own event production company, Poplife Productions, where she produced events and experiences for cultural icons including Whitaker Forest, Naomi CampbellYasin Bey, Stevie WonderJay-Z, Sean “P. Diddy” Combs and Yoko Ono. In 2013, Henri got into documentary production as associate producer of the film Feel Rich: Health is the New Wealth, produced by his mentor. quincy jones. In 2014, Henri produced the inaugural Getting Real Documentary Film Conference for the International Documentary Association (IDA). In 2016, she returned to produce both the 2nd Biannual Getting Real Conference as well as the 32nd Annual International Documentary Awards. Hargrove is her first film as a director.

Duration: 105 minutes

Website: https://www.hargrovedocumentary.com/
Facebook: @HargroveDocumentary
Twitter: @FilmHargrove

For media inquiries, please contact:

Eliane Henry
Eliane@poplifeproductions.com
(213) 886-9630

Media Contact

Press Inquiries, Poplife Productions, (213) 886-9630, Eliane@poplifeproductions.com

SOURCE Poplife Productions

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