Ireland – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 20:03:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Ireland – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 Q&A: Dolapo Adedokun on IT, Ireland and all that jazz | MIT News https://iridiumjazz.com/qa-dolapo-adedokun-on-it-ireland-and-all-that-jazz-mit-news/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 20:03:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/qa-dolapo-adedokun-on-it-ireland-and-all-that-jazz-mit-news/ Adedolapo Adedokun has a lot to look forward to in 2023. After graduating in Electrical and Computer Engineering next spring, he will travel to Ireland to undertake a Masters in Intelligent Systems at Trinity College Dublin as the fourth MIT student to receive the prestigious George J. Mitchell Scholarship. But there is more to Adedokun, […]]]>

Adedolapo Adedokun has a lot to look forward to in 2023. After graduating in Electrical and Computer Engineering next spring, he will travel to Ireland to undertake a Masters in Intelligent Systems at Trinity College Dublin as the fourth MIT student to receive the prestigious George J. Mitchell Scholarship. But there is more to Adedokun, which goes through Dolapo, than just academic success. In addition to being a talented computer scientist, the senior is an accomplished musician, an influential member of the student government and an anime fan.

Question: What motivates you the most to go to Ireland to study for a year?

A: One of the reasons I got interested in Ireland was when I heard about Music Generation, a national initiative for music education in Ireland, with the aim of giving every Irish child the access to the arts through access to music lessons, performance opportunities and music education. inside and outside the classroom. It made me think, “Wow, this is a country that recognizes the importance of arts and music education and has invested in making it accessible to people from all walks of life. I am inspired by this initiative and wish it was something I could have had growing up.

I am also very inspired by the work of Louis Stewart, an amazing jazz guitarist who was born and raised in Dublin. I am delighted to explore its musical influences and to delve into Dublin’s rich music community. I hope to join a jazz group, maybe a trio or quartet, and perform all over town, immerse myself in the rich Irish music scene, but also share my own styles and musical influences with the community there – low.

Question: Of course, while you’re at it you’ll be working on your HS in smart systems. I am intrigued by your invention of a smart home system that allows users to layer different melodies as they enter and exit a building. Can you tell us a bit more about this system: how it works, how you see users interacting with and experiencing it, and what you learned while developing it?

A: Funny enough, it actually started out as a system I worked on in my first year in 6.08 (Introduction to Embedded Systems) with a few classmates. We called it Smart HOMiE, an IoT [internet-of-things] Arduino smart home device that gathered basic information like location, weather and interfaced with Amazon Alexa. I forgot to work on it until I took 21M.080 (Introduction to Music Technology) and 6.033 (Computer Systems Engineering) in my first year, and I started to explore applications creatives of machine learning and computing in areas such as audio synthesis and digital instrument design. I’ve discovered amazing projects like Google Magenta’s Tone Transfer ML, models that use machine learning models to turn sounds into legitimate musical instruments. As I got to know this unique intersection of music and technology, I began to think about larger questions, such as: “What kind of creative future can technology create?” How can technology enable anyone to be expressive? “

When I had some free time at home for a year, I wanted to play around with some of the audio synthesis tools I had learned. I took Smart HOMiE and improved it a bit, made it a bit more musical. It worked in three main stages. First, multiple people could sing along and record melodies that the device would save and store. Then, using a few Python pitch correction and audio synthesis libraries, Smart HOMiE corrected the recorded melodies until they fit together, or generally fit in the same key, in musical terms. Finally, it would then combine the melodies, add harmony, or layer the track over a backing track, and in the end you created something really unique and expressive. It was definitely a bit disjointed, but it was one of my first times messing around and exploring all the work that has already been done by amazing people in this space. Technology has this incredible potential to make anyone a creator – I would love to create the tools to make it happen.

Question: You yourself are a jazz instrumentalist. Tell us more!

A: I’ve always had an affinity for music, but I didn’t always feel like I could become a musician. I had played the saxophone in college but it never really stuck. When I first came to MIT I was fortunate enough to take 21M.051 (Fundamentals of Music) and immerse myself in the proper music theory for the first time. It was in this class that I was exposed to jazz and that I completely fell in love with it. I will never forget returning to New House from the Barker Library during my freshman year and stumbling upon “Undercurrent” by Bill Evans and Jim Hall – I think that’s when I decided to learn jazz guitar.

Jazz, and improvisation in particular, has taught me so much about what it means to be creative: to be willing to experiment, to take risks, to rely on the work of others, and to accept failure – all skills which I sincerely believe have made me a better technologist and leader. Most importantly, I think music and jazz taught me patience and discipline, and mastering a skill takes a lifetime. I would be lying if I said I was happy with my current situation, but every day I look forward to taking a step forward towards my goals.

Question: You focused on music and arts education, and the potential of technology to strengthen both. Is there a particularly influential class, technology, or teacher in your past that you can point to as a life-changing agent?

A: Whoa, difficult question! I think there are a few inflection points that have really driven change for me. The first was in high school when I discovered Guitar Hero, the musical rhythm video game that started as a project in the MIT Media Lab attempting to bring the joy of making music to people from all walks of life. It was then that I was able to observe the multidisciplinary influence of technology in the service of others.

The next one, I would say, was 6.033 at MIT. From the first day of class, the teacher [Katrina] LaCurts focused on understanding the people we design for. That we should view system design as inherently people-oriented – before we think about designing a system, we must first consider the people who will be using it. We need to consider their goals, their personalities, their backgrounds, the obstacles they face and, most importantly, the consequences of our design and implementation choices. I imagine a future where music, the arts, and the creative process are accessible to everyone, and I believe 6.033 has given me the foundation to build the technology to achieve this goal.

Question: You have also developed a passion for broadband infrastructure, which at first glance people might not get connected to music and education, your other two goals. Why is broadband such an important factor?

A: Before we can think about the potential of technology to democratize accessibility to music and the arts, we must first step back and think about accessibility. Which communities have increasingly less access to the appropriate technology that we often take for granted? I think broadband is only one factor in the realm of the bigger problem, which is accessibility, especially in minority and low-income communities. I see technology as the key to democratizing access to music and the arts for people from all walks of life, but this technology can only be the key if the basic infrastructure is in place for everyone. takes advantage. Just as I learned in 6.033, this means understanding the barriers of people and communities with the least access, and investing in critical core technological resources like fair high-speed internet access.

Question: Between your work on the Undergraduate Student Advisory Group at EECS, the Harvard / MIT Cooperative Society, the MIT Chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers, and of course all your research and many academic interests, plenty of readers have to ask if you have ever eaten or sleep! How did you balance your busy life at MIT and maintain your self-esteem while accomplishing so much as an undergraduate student?

A: Excellent question! I’ll start by saying that it took me a while to figure it out. There were semesters where I had to drop classes and / or give up extracurricular commitments to find some balance. It’s always hard, to be surrounded by the brightest students in the world who are all doing amazing and amazing things, not to feel like you need to add one more class or one more UROP.

I think the most important thing, however, is to stay true to yourself – to figure out the things that bring you joy, that turn you on, and how many of those commitments are reasonable to make in each semester. I’m not a student who can take a million classes, research, internships, and clubs at the same time, but that’s totally okay. It took me a while to find the things I liked and understand the academic load that was appropriate for me each semester, but once I did I was happier than ever. I realized that things like playing tennis and basketball, playing with friends, and even sneaking into a few anime episodes here and there were really important to me. As long as I can look back each week, month, semester and year and say that I have taken a step forward towards my academic, social and musical goals, even the smallest, then I think I am taking action in the good direction.

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New issue of the Jazz Research Journal on diversity and inclusion – with editorial podcast – News, reviews, articles and commentary from the London jazz scene and beyond https://iridiumjazz.com/new-issue-of-the-jazz-research-journal-on-diversity-and-inclusion-with-editorial-podcast-news-reviews-articles-and-commentary-from-the-london-jazz-scene-and-beyond/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 23:47:36 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/new-issue-of-the-jazz-research-journal-on-diversity-and-inclusion-with-editorial-podcast-news-reviews-articles-and-commentary-from-the-london-jazz-scene-and-beyond/ Article / Interview Sébastien writes: A good friend of LJN, Dr Nicolas Pillai, now at University College Dublin where he is Assistant Professor in Creative and Critical Practice, has been in touch regarding the recently published issue of Jazz Research Journal, Vol 14 Issue 2, primarily written in 2020. It focuses on diversity and inclusion […]]]>

Article / Interview

Sébastien writes:

A good friend of LJN, Dr Nicolas Pillai, now at University College Dublin where he is Assistant Professor in Creative and Critical Practice, has been in touch regarding the recently published issue of Jazz Research Journal, Vol 14 Issue 2, primarily written in 2020.

It focuses on diversity and inclusion in jazz festivals. Guest editors are Sarah raine from the University of Limerick, Ireland and Emily jones of sage Gateshead.

Nic tells us about an unusual feature of this problem: “Above all, we wanted the research to reach industry and the public. The editorial in this special issue of Jazz Research Journal therefore takes the form of a podcast.

It has been incorporated here courtesy of Jazz Research Journal and Equinox Publishing.

Emily Jones and Sarah Raine explain: “In conversation with the editor-in-chief of JRJ Nicolas Pillai, we discuss the journey of this special issue, the issues linked to diversity and inclusion in the current jazz scene, and offer a playlist inspired by different people, places and jazz issues that fill these pages. . “

LIST OF ARTICLES IN THE ISSUE:

  • The Guardians’ Puzzle: Diversity and Inclusion Programming in a Jazz Festival – Michael Allemana, University of Chicago (United States)
  • Festa do Jazz: A case study on the (dis) balance of genres in Portuguese jazz. – José Dias, University of Coventry (United Kingdom) and Beatriz Nunes, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal)
  • Gender politics, UK jazz festivals and COVID-19: sustaining momentum for change in times of crisis – Sarah Raine, University of Limerick (Ireland)
  • On the Sunny Side of the Street: Bypass Race for Inclusion at New Orleans Jazz Fest – Sonya A. Grier, American University (United States)
  • Complementary reflections, and a ManiFESTo, on jazz (festivals) and the decolonization of music – George McKay, University of East Anglia (UK)

LINKS: Jazz Research Journal Editorial in full

Home page JRJ and susubscriptions

Nicolas Pillai at UCD, Dublin

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Christmas Jazz Café at the Island Theater, Ballinamore https://iridiumjazz.com/christmas-jazz-cafe-at-the-island-theater-ballinamore/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 14:00:49 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/christmas-jazz-cafe-at-the-island-theater-ballinamore/ The Island Theater is delighted to present North by Northwest Quartet, Rollins by Night at the Christmas Jazz Cafe this Friday December 17th at 8pm. Leitrim saxophonist Cathal Roche who recently presented his project Duke Ellington at Island Theater Ballinamore returns with a new jazz quartet of musicians from Leitrim, Roscommon, Donegal and Belfast to […]]]>

The Island Theater is delighted to present North by Northwest Quartet, Rollins by Night at the Christmas Jazz Cafe this Friday December 17th at 8pm.

Leitrim saxophonist Cathal Roche who recently presented his project Duke Ellington at Island Theater Ballinamore returns with a new jazz quartet of musicians from Leitrim, Roscommon, Donegal and Belfast to pay tribute to the music of legendary saxophonist Sonny Rollins.

Cathal says: “I started playing jazz as a 14-year-old busker 30 years ago under the Merchant Arch in Dublin after hearing Sonny Rollins’ album ‘The Bridge’ for the first time.
“Sonny instantly became a hero and one of my guides. As a recording of jazz standards, “Them Bridge” sounded completely different from anything I had heard before. The playful sound of Sonny’s tenorb saxophone is sought after and personal, carrying something of the nighttime street sounds of Williamsburg Bridge, New York, a bridge Sonny trained on for a two-year sabbatical before moving on. occur before recording the album.

“The music and openness of this man gave jazz musicians the right to perform solo and to absorb, to attract people and places, and to make things more spontaneous, more sincere and personal… ”
Cathal’s new band, The N x NW Quartet, will revisit some of Rollins’ favorite tracks in the spirit and sax-guitar combo of The Bridge and feature the talents of legendary British guitarist Phil Robson (Roscommon), bassist by Donegal Conor Murray (half of the Murray Brothers’ twin duo) and Belfast drummer Dr David Lyttle.

Tickets available at www.islandtheatre.ie
This project was made possible with the support of Leitrim County Council and the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sports and Media as part of the 2021 local live entertainment programming program.

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Busking study: classical music pays more than rock, jazz or pop covers https://iridiumjazz.com/busking-study-classical-music-pays-more-than-rock-jazz-or-pop-covers/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 15:05:28 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/busking-study-classical-music-pays-more-than-rock-jazz-or-pop-covers/ Ed Sheeran began his musical career performing in the streets of Dublin. At the time, the artist might have been able to make a better living if he had played classical music rather than pop or rock songs, according to the findings of a team of European researchers, published in a recent study. . From […]]]>

Ed Sheeran began his musical career performing in the streets of Dublin. At the time, the artist might have been able to make a better living if he had played classical music rather than pop or rock songs, according to the findings of a team of European researchers, published in a recent study. .

From New York to Shanghai, London to Berlin, music lovers can find street musicians in most cities around the world. But their income is not always stable, because it depends on the generosity of passers-by. However, a study recently published in the Marketing Letters newspaper, reveals that certain musical and weather factors can increase their income.

Samuel Stäbler and Kim Katharina Mierisch studied the behavior of more than 80,000 people who donated money to street musicians in Cologne between December 2016 and March 2017. While they earned an average of € 23 (RM 110) Nowadays, the style of music they played has significantly influenced their income. The researchers found that pieces from the classical repertoire were particularly popular with passers-by. In this case, they were earning € 27 (RM129) per hour, compared to only € 11 (RM 53) per hour for rock, jazz or pop covers.

From days of the week to weather conditions

Even more surprisingly, the environment in which street musicians operate has a real impact on their income at the end of the day. The researchers found that they received more donations if they played in a square rather than in the middle of the street.

The presence of an audience is also a factor. Passers-by tend to touch their wallets more easily when in company, to show their generosity. Other factors to consider are the age and gender of music lovers who can donate money to street musicians. Women tend to be more generous than men, as do people between the ages of 30 and 65, according to the study.

The researchers also found that people seemed more supportive of children and young people playing music on the streets. So much so that they earn on average 45 € (215 RM) per hour, which is almost double what their elders earn.

However, the latter can dramatically increase their income if they occur on Sunday – especially if the weather is bad on that day.

“We find that consumers are more likely to donate in cold weather, possibly because they feel a greater liking for the musician or because physically cold consumers are more likely to respond favorably to emotionally warm stimuli,” write Researchers. – AFP

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The best roots, jazz, trad and classical albums from the 2021 Ticket https://iridiumjazz.com/the-best-roots-jazz-trad-and-classical-albums-from-the-2021-ticket/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-best-roots-jazz-trad-and-classical-albums-from-the-2021-ticket/ Top 5 Americana / roots 2021 Nowadays, genre, like genre, is fluid. Robert Plant and Alison Krauss take this approach on their long-awaited Raise the Roof, bending songs from the canons of blues, folk, country and soul to their elegant and imaginative will. The Felice Brothers specialize in shambolic lo-fi rock, but folk, country and […]]]>

Top 5 Americana / roots 2021

Nowadays, genre, like genre, is fluid. Robert Plant and Alison Krauss take this approach on their long-awaited Raise the Roof, bending songs from the canons of blues, folk, country and soul to their elegant and imaginative will. The Felice Brothers specialize in shambolic lo-fi rock, but folk, country and beyond are employed in their thoughtful topical reflections on “this life where all joyful things are paid double in suffering.” The remarkable Rhiannon Giddens (with Francesco Turrisi) knows no boundaries, while James McMurtry is simply a Texan gem, partly raw but never precious. Carsie Blanton too – progressive sympathies with a smile. – Joe Breen

Robert Plant and Alison Krauss: Raise the roof
The Felice brothers: From dreams to dust
Rhiannon Giddens with Francesco Turrisi: They call me home
James McMurtry: Horses and dogs
Carsie Blanton: Love and rage

Matthieu Halpin.  Photography: Julia Haack

Matthieu Halpin. Photography: Julia Haack

Top 5 Jazz Albums 2021

In a strong year for Irish jazz releases, any of these five gems could easily claim the top spot. Irish-Japanese pianist Izumi Kimura’s collaboration with violinist Cora Venus Lunny and sound artist Anthony Kelly was love at first sight. Fusion giant Larry Coryell’s last studio recording, featuring Dublin’s best rhythm section by bassist Dave Redmond and drummer Kevin Brady, was a fitting coda for an illustrious career. The release of Brady’s own electric quartet, with heavy American talent on board, further bolstered the drummer’s growing reputation. London singer Lauren Kinsella skillfully deployed the studio as a tool for improvisation with her partner Snowpoet, multi-instrumentalist Chris Hyson. But, if I’m forced to choose, it’s the impressive debut of Cologne-based Irish saxophonist Matthew Halpin, with mercurial drummer Seán Carpio part of a strong collective response to the leader’s compositions, which perhaps best exemplifies the growing confidence of a new generation of Irish improvisers. – Cormac Larkin

Matthieu Halpin: Agreements
Kevin Brady Electric Quartet: Plan B
Izumi Kimura / Cora Venus Lunny / Anthony Kelly: Folding
Snowpoet: Wait for me
Larry Coryell: Last swing with Ireland

Top 5 traditional albums 2021

At the end of another year where musicians have been largely tied to the house, there is a refuge to be taken in new album releases that help fill that void. The gargantuan endeavor of releasing an album under such difficult circumstances cannot be underestimated either. This year’s tapestry was rich, including the delusional shock of John Francis Flynn’s new, the sense of belonging anchored in the albums of Emma O’Leary and Aidan Connolly, and the nostalgic longing for An Irish Viola / Víola Gaelach by Séamus McGuire amplifying the vitality that underlies tradition. And the Skara Brae reissue is a home gem. – Siobhan Long

John Francis Flynn: I wouldn’t always live
Séamus McGuire with Steve Cooney: An Irish viola / Víola Gaelach
Emma O’Leary: Mo Cheantar Fein
Aidan Connolly: The Portland Arch
Skara Brae: Skara Brae

Chiaroscuro quartet

Chiaroscuro quartet

Top 5 classic albums 2021

The selection of the five best albums that I have reviewed this year was obvious. They are all on a small scale, involving music for only a handful of musicians, and feature performances of exceptional insight and delivery. Italian violinist Francesca Dego pays homage to Paganini on Paganini’s own Guarneri del Gesù from 1743. Siobhán Armstrong and his friends explore the 16th century through the magical sounds of the Irish harp. Violinist Daniel Rowland and his friends freely unleash the sensuality of the chamber works of Chausson, Debussy and Franck. But in the end it was a tie between the Brahms viola sonatas of Antoine Tamestit and Cédric Tiberghien and three of Haydn’s Op 76 string quartets of the Chiaroscura Quartet, both albums making great, familiar music entirely new. – Michel Dervan

Haydn string quartets op. 76 nos 4-6 – Chiaroscuro quartet
Brahms: Sonatas Op 120; Nachtigall; Wiegenlied; Gesänge Op 91 –Antoine Tamestit, Cédric Tiberghien
He cannone – Francesca Dego plays the violin of Paganini
Music, Ireland and the 16th century – Crux, The Irish Consort / Siobhán Armstrong
A French Connection: Chausson, Debussy, Franck – Daniel Rowland, Natacha Kudritskaya, Francesco Sica, Asia Jiménez Antón de Vez, Joel Waterman, Maja Bogdanovic

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Traditional music meets jazz as Damien McGeehan hits uncharted territory https://iridiumjazz.com/traditional-music-meets-jazz-as-damien-mcgeehan-hits-uncharted-territory/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/traditional-music-meets-jazz-as-damien-mcgeehan-hits-uncharted-territory/ He’s been preparing for a while, but Donegal’s violinist Damien McGeehan’s new solo album contains a whole slew of surprises lurking under its hood. Having forged a reputation as a formidable violinist during the revolutionary debut of the fiddling trio Fidil, and having tapped into the depths of his home country tradition with his debut […]]]>

He’s been preparing for a while, but Donegal’s violinist Damien McGeehan’s new solo album contains a whole slew of surprises lurking under its hood.

Having forged a reputation as a formidable violinist during the revolutionary debut of the fiddling trio Fidil, and having tapped into the depths of his home country tradition with his debut solo album, The Tin Fiddle, McGeehan is now venturing into the field. unknown with his latest collection, Kin.

This is where traditional tunes meet jazz and a tinge of blues, with a rockabilly edge, just for fun.

“It’s been a few years since it is recorded at this stage”, offers Damien with an ironic smile. “This is not at all a pandemic project. The hardest part was trying to keep everyone’s schedules in sync, but we finally got there.

Certain drone and percussion tracks by Liam Bradley were the only elements of this album recorded during the pandemic. Kin, unsurprisingly, is an album imbued with a strong sense of people and place. It marks a milestone in a musical journey that has taken this violin player to places he never imagined possible.

“With The Tin Fiddle, I wanted to focus only on the Tin Fiddle,” McGeehan offers, reflecting on his solo debut in 2017. “It was really specific. He focused on a really traditional sound, without any effect. I always think of the sound of the group when I arrange music: where everything has a particular space in the arrangement.

“I’ve always thought from a band’s perspective anyway, so it was a natural progression for me to go from The Tin Fiddle to this album, although it seems like it’s not at all. a progression.”

For this album, McGeehan adopted songs for the first time, with his wife Shauna Mullin guesting on a number of key tracks. Her voice is an earthy blend of Dolores Keane in her prime and June Tabor. It’s an intriguing combination of violin and vocals, with finely tempered arrangements, and a guest list that includes co-producer, Seán Óg Graham on guitar, ukulele, accordion and mellotron and Kieran Munnelly on flute and violin. Richard Thompson’s Strange Affair and Tom Waits’ The Briar and the Rose find a solid buy in the capable hands of Mullin, alongside a rich array of diverse orchestrations.

“As far as the songs go, I mostly work as a session musician now and I support singers a lot,” says McGeehan. “People also send their songs to me at home, and I record violin on them. It’s something I’ve been doing for years now. So it was a very natural progression for me.

I have developed interests in many different genres of music over the years and also meeting many different musicians so I have tried to tie it all together.

Recording with his wife Shauna was another godsend that came with this album recording.

“We were in UL [University of Limerick] at the same time, ”he says,“ and we learned so much – from all the sessions and concerts we went to while we were there! This is where I first bumped into Tom Waits, to be honest. Of course, everyone knows Tom Waits! And this song, The Briar and the Rose is one of our favorites. He writes songs that lend themselves to so many different interpretations. And that also goes for Richard Thompson. Shauna’s take on Strange Affair is definitely influenced by June Tabor’s version of this song.

McGeehan’s roots in Donegal are visible and he is very happy that they reveal so much about who he is and where he came from. McGeehan’s frame of reference extends well beyond the traditional realm.

“I’ve developed an interest in a lot of different musical genres over the years,” he says, “and meeting a lot of different musicians as well, so I tried to tie it all together. When I was growing up my dad was a huge influence on me. He was in a huge range of music, and this had a great influence on the music that I went looking for myself.

The strong sense of belonging is palpable throughout Kin. The opening track, An chéad chathlán, is a tune dedicated to his grandfather, Peadar, and a nod to the place his grandfather called his home, Finntown.

“Finntown was where my grandfather used to live,” McGeehan says. “We used to go there when I was young, and there was this big and beautiful lake where we would go fishing, and this place is so etched in my memory.”

Making an album is a big financial commitment, but the vision I had for this album, I really needed this funding from the Canada Council to make it happen.

African rhythms also permeate Kin, with McGeehan’s love for New Orleans scintillating in the warmth of some fine brass, recorded in Nashville, but with an unmistakable kinship to the technicolor sounds of Bourbon Street.

“Myself and Shauna went to New Orleans for a week,” he says, relishing the impact this brief stay had on him. “We checked into the hotel and the first thing we did was go to Preservation Hall where we heard a great jazz band, and it was just amazing.

“It’s a crazy place: it’s the atmosphere and the spirit of the place. I just felt it was so amazing: a typical jazz band playing the tune of the air and then the clarinetist will do a solo and during that the trumpeter will start playing him, then the trombone will do it, and by the end of the set, they were all playing hard and that was the sound I wanted to create on this track, Runnin ‘on Bourbon.

“And it’s also in the last track The Girl and The Lass. That atmosphere comes over you. It’s like being at Glenties Fiddle week, except they’re trombones and trumpets. It’s surreal. I didn’t mean to. no tight brass, but I wanted them to create this chaos! ”

McGeehan is not a musician to retain his many influences. He has fond memories of touring with the late Senegalese kora player, Solo Cissokho, and had decided to invite Cissokho to contribute to the album, before learning of his untimely death.

“Solo Sissokho was a truly magical being,” McGeehan said with a broad smile. “I wanted him to play this song, but he passed away shortly before. I was in contact with his nephew, Seku who is another great kora player and percussionist. Solo’s influence was huge on me: not just the music he played, but his whole mind, his soul, just what he brought to the music.

McGeehan is now a member of Daniel O’Donnell’s band, but the touring schedule allows for some very pleasant and long stays at home (even before the pandemic) where McGeehan has had the luxury of time to work on his solo projects. An award from the Arts Council Deis was also key to the release of this album, he admits.

“Making an album is a big financial commitment, but the vision I had for this album, I really needed this funding from the Arts Council to get there,” admits Damien. “When you listen to the album, even the brass: the costs add up very, very quickly. And there is also a great artistic freedom, with the Deis price. It’s not like a record company gives you money: and says it wants X, Y, and Z. I don’t think I could have made the album without it, to be honest.

Kin is out now. Damienmcgeehan.com

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JAZZ Chez CAVALIERS | STRENGTHS OF THE COMPLETE GAME | December 5, 2021 – Oakland News Now https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-chez-cavaliers-strengths-of-the-complete-game-december-5-2021-oakland-news-now/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 23:10:06 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-chez-cavaliers-strengths-of-the-complete-game-december-5-2021-oakland-news-now/ Oakland News Now – JAZZ at the CAVALIERS | STRENGTHS OF THE COMPLETE GAME | December 5, 2021 – video made by the YouTube channel with the logo in the upper left corner of the video. OaklandNewsNow.com is the original blog post for this type of video blog content. Stream more games live with the […]]]>

Oakland News Now –

JAZZ at the CAVALIERS | STRENGTHS OF THE COMPLETE GAME | December 5, 2021

– video made by the YouTube channel with the logo in the upper left corner of the video. OaklandNewsNow.com is the original blog post for this type of video blog content.

Stream more games live with the NBA LEAGUE PASS: https://ift.tt/3pGmCJj The Utah Jazz beat the Cleveland Cavaliers, 109-108.

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WIN: 4 tickets to Criss Cross Europe’s improvised jazz concert in Dublin, plus a meeting with American drummer Jim Black https://iridiumjazz.com/win-4-tickets-to-criss-cross-europes-improvised-jazz-concert-in-dublin-plus-a-meeting-with-american-drummer-jim-black/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 12:56:45 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/win-4-tickets-to-criss-cross-europes-improvised-jazz-concert-in-dublin-plus-a-meeting-with-american-drummer-jim-black/ European collaboration Criss Cross Europe is expected to bring their improvised jazz skills to historic Freemason’s Hall on December 9, led by famous Seattle-born Berlin drummer Jim Black. The collaborative group of Europe’s burgeoning top jazz stars (including acclaimed Irish guitarist Chris Guilfoyle) are set to create a unique evening of music, juxtaposing the old […]]]>

European collaboration Criss Cross Europe is expected to bring their improvised jazz skills to historic Freemason’s Hall on December 9, led by famous Seattle-born Berlin drummer Jim Black.

The collaborative group of Europe’s burgeoning top jazz stars (including acclaimed Irish guitarist Chris Guilfoyle) are set to create a unique evening of music, juxtaposing the old and the modern with contemporary European jazz on December 9, alongside the mentor Jim Black.

International initiative Criss Cross, in collaboration with Improvised Music Company, has chosen the veteran and charismatic dummer to supervise the pan-European team of six virtuosos. Seeking to represent the evolution of jazz in the modern landscape, Criss Cross brought in the graduate of the Berklee School of Music.

Having lived in Berlin since 2016, Jim Black has performed alongside famous avant-garde saxophonist and label owner Tim Berne and trumpeter / composer Dave Douglas in his day. Having studied in Boston, Jim went on to form his own group AlasNoAxis with Hilmar Jensson, Chris Speed ​​and Skúli Sverrisson. Winter & Winter have released several of the group’s post-rock jazz albums. He is also a third of the BBC group with alto saxophonist Bern and Wilco’s Nels Cline. A warm presence, his 25 years of performing have helped bring jazz into the 21st century.

Hot Press is now offering four tickets to the extremely exciting evening of improvised jazz music in historic Freemason’s Hall, Dublin. Not only that, the lucky winner will also experience a meeting with Black himself between 7:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. on the night of December 9.

For a chance to win this brilliant prize, simply complete the form below:

Revisit our November 29 interview with Jim Black ahead of the highly anticipated show here.

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Phil Ware’s jazz community rallies around him after stroke https://iridiumjazz.com/phil-wares-jazz-community-rallies-around-him-after-stroke/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/phil-wares-jazz-community-rallies-around-him-after-stroke/ On June 3 of last year, my friend Phil Ware suffered a stroke from a ruptured aneurysm that changed his life forever. Although he was fortunate to survive (50% of people with ruptured aneurysms do not survive the ambulance ride), the injury rendered him unable to use the right side of his body and severely […]]]>

On June 3 of last year, my friend Phil Ware suffered a stroke from a ruptured aneurysm that changed his life forever. Although he was fortunate to survive (50% of people with ruptured aneurysms do not survive the ambulance ride), the injury rendered him unable to use the right side of his body and severely damaged his speech and his comprehension.

Of course, such an event is a disaster for anyone, but to Phil, one of Ireland’s most respected jazz pianists, it seemed particularly cruel. Musicians who perform at a high level inevitably come to confuse their identity with their talent, and with all of his virtuosity gone in an instant, I know Phil has asked himself several times since his injury, “If I can’t anymore. play, who am I? ”Fortunately, over the past year and a half, his friends and fans have helped him answer this question.

With dyed blonde hair, various piercings and a thumb ring, Phil cut a dashing figure when he stepped onto the Irish jazz scene 20 years ago. Born in London in 1972, Phil was already a young jazz pianist highly regarded on the British scene – twice finalist in the prestigious Young Jazz Musician of the Year competition – before deciding to settle in Dublin.

“To think that Phil might never play again was heartbreaking”

“The stage immediately benefited from his presence,” recalls bassist Ronan Guilfoyle, director of the Jazz Performance program at the University of Dublin, “because jazz pianists really good, swinging, with great technique and good sound, weren’t too thick on the floor. He became a favorite of many musicians, especially singers, for whom he had a special affinity.

One of those singers, who would become Phil’s close friend and confidant, was jazz singer Honor Heffernan. “We met at a Louis Stewart concert at the Shelbourne Hotel,” Heffernan explains, “and we hit it off immediately. When I started working with Phil, I quickly realized he had a wonderful understanding of how to accompany a singer. I loved singing with him and he always pushed me to be braver and take risks.

Phil took to Dublin as much as Dublin took to him. Together with bassist Dave Redmond and drummer Kevin Brady, he formed what would become the nation’s leading piano trio and their debut album, In Our Own Time (2007), received widespread acclaim. Phil’s trio were also a first call for visiting musicians, and to his delight they also found themselves returning to London regularly, especially to perform with famous jazz singer Ian Shaw. In 2016, Phil received the Music Network sponsored Artist-in-Residence position at the Triskel Arts Center in Cork, starting an association with Triskel’s director, Tony Sheehan, which grew into a lasting friendship.

Along with bassist Dave Redmond and drummer Kevin Brady, Phil Ware formed what would become the nation’s leading piano trio.

“Phil had come of age as a player,” Sheehan explains, “and he had a unique talent for creating those really lovely moments that stay with you long after the gig is over. He had delicacy in his style and true virtuosity and as a conductor he loved working with other musicians so he was a natural fit.

Usually when people suffer from life-changing brain damage, there is a close family – partners, siblings, children – to support them and make crucial decisions about treatment, but with Phil there was a vacuum. . With both parents dead and half-sister Alison stranded in the UK by the pandemic, Phil was effectively alone in the world. Heffernan, who Phil had referred to as his next of kin, realized that Phil needed family and, to his credit, didn’t hesitate to step in and stand up for his friend.

“When I heard he had had a stroke,” Heffernan says, “I was devastated. I really didn’t want to believe what I was hearing. The thought that Phil might never play again was heartbreaking. The first time I saw him in the Mater, so stunned and upset, I was determined to support him until the end.

As word spread throughout the wider jazz community, friends and fans of Phil began to ask how they could help, so with Heffernan and Brady, and with expert advice from accountant Gaby Smyth and neurologist Prof Colin Doherty of Trinity College and St James’s Hospital. , we created the Phil Ware Trust. Like most jazz musicians, Phil didn’t have a lot of savings or assets, and Professor Doherty indicated that while his immediate care would be covered by the health care system, he would ultimately need substantial resources to to support his continuing rehabilitation and to help him in the future.

Phil’s progress in the year and a half since his injury has been remarkable

It has been one of the most positive and affirming aspects of Phil’s journey since his injury that his care has always been excellent and always free. From emergency admission at Mater Hospital to life-saving surgery at Beaumont Hospital, expert rehabilitation at Royal Hospital Donnybrook and now ongoing rehabilitation at Orwell Healthcare in Rathgar, no one has ever asked who paid before giving Phil the highest standard. of care.

“Phil’s journey is a great example of a comprehensive acute care and rehabilitation program that rivals anything he would have received anywhere in the world; and unlike other countries that offer this level of service, it didn’t have to pay a dime for it. The term ‘Third World health care system’ is often used to refer to the Irish health care system, “says Prof. Doherty,” but that is an insult to the fabulous, dedicated and compassionate staff of Irish hospitals and community institutions ” .

Phil’s progress over the past year and a half since his injury has been remarkable – now he can walk with a stick, his speech continues to improve, and his sense of humor and sense of himself have grown stronger. over the months – but it’s far from certain that he will ever perform again, and while we all hope he can one day live on his own, it will require the kind of resources few musicians do. jazz have access. But the response to the fund is a measure of the esteem in which Phil is held by the Irish jazz community.

Beautiful contributions have come from friends of Phil, including director Neil Jordan, and supporting organizations such as the Improvised Music Company and Jazz Ireland, as well as countless small donations from his fellow musicians, many of whom could barely afford pay rent in the past. year. In July, a group of its former students, led by singer Aleka Potinga, organized an online benefit, led by singer Mary Coughlan, and last month, staff and students of DCU’s jazz program hosted an football tournament to raise money for the fund. .

When we told Phil what we were planning his reaction was disbelief

“The outpouring of love and support for Phil has been truly inspiring,” Heffernan said. “He knows all of this and is really moved by it, just like me. It’s great to know that we are not alone on this journey.”

Tony Sheehan was one of the first to contact the trust seeking help, and with Triskel Christchurch – one of the nation’s premier venues for jazz and creative music – at his disposal, Sheehan offered a benefit concert all -star. It’s been a tough year and a half for live music and we’ve been patiently waiting to be allowed to put on a live concert, but on December 11th some of Phil’s closest musician friends will finally perform what appears to be the event. jazz of the year. Led by Heffernan and members of Phil’s own trio, the evening will feature renowned saxophonist Richie Buckley, his cousin guitarist Hugh Buckley and two of Cork’s brightest jazz stars, trombonist Paul Dunlea and pianist Cormac McCarthy .

When we told Phil what we were planning, his reaction was disbelief. He still finds it hard to believe that someone cares, but his friends keep proving him wrong. And as much as the excellent care Phil has received from his medical and rehabilitation teams, is knowing that his musical family is always with him – wanting him, visiting him, calling him by video, giving him support. food and cigarettes – which prompted him to continue working on his rehab, getting better and hopefully one day putting his magical hands back on a piano.

To purchase tickets for A Night For Phil, see triskelartscentre.ie

To donate to the Fund for Phil, visit thefundforphil.com

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New contest to brighten up the Limerick music scene https://iridiumjazz.com/new-contest-to-brighten-up-the-limerick-music-scene/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/new-contest-to-brighten-up-the-limerick-music-scene/ LIMERICK Jazz in association with Improvised Music Company has announced that it will welcome the very first young Irish jazz musician 2022 to the University concert hall next April. The finalists of the competition will perform with a Limerick Jazz house band before a jury, led by world-renowned composer and legendary Limerick musician Bill Whelan. […]]]>

LIMERICK Jazz in association with Improvised Music Company has announced that it will welcome the very first young Irish jazz musician 2022 to the University concert hall next April.

The finalists of the competition will perform with a Limerick Jazz house band before a jury, led by world-renowned composer and legendary Limerick musician Bill Whelan.

The young Irish jazz musician chosen in 2022 will have the opportunity to make a professional studio recording with a professional ensemble.

They will also perform in the UCH Rising Stars Concert alongside outstanding young musicians of classical music and opera, and receive a scholarship to attend an international summer school, featuring young Irish jazz talent. on a larger stage.

A whole new essential platform for the best emerging talent in Irish jazz, the competition is open to young jazz musicians between the ages of 13-18. Details on how to apply are available at limerickjazz.com.

Irish jazz history runs through both organizations as Limerick Jazz celebrates its 40th anniversary this year and Improvised Music Company its 30th.

The inaugural Young Irish Jazz Musician Award highlights the exceptional talent of the Irish jazz scene and the promise of the next 40 years of jazz in Ireland.

Limerick Jazz and IMC plan to make this a regular event to raise the profile of jazz among young people who can combine their entries with the study of improvised music as part of their broader musical studies in the junior and senior cycles.

John Daly, President of Limerick Jazz, commented: “Limerick Jazz is both thrilled and delighted to launch this excellent initiative for our rising generation of jazz musicians. It is a natural development of our long-standing activity in teaching jazz. We are delighted to have IMC as a privileged partner for this event “.

Kenneth Killeen, Director of Improvised Music Company, added: “IMC is delighted to develop this Young Jazz Musician of the Year award with Limerick Jazz. Providing a platform to spotlight and recognize formative jazz talents is crucial for the development and long-term sustainability of this music and will provide a fantastic opportunity for the first winner in 2022. ”

Limerick Jazz Society is a registered charity and is supported by the Arts Council and Limerick City and County Council.

The final of the Young Irish Jazz Musician 2022 will take place on April 10.

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