Ireland – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 09:52:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Ireland – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 LIVE: Sorry / Wünderhorse, The Jazz Café, Camden, London, 21/06/2022 https://iridiumjazz.com/live-sorry-wunderhorse-the-jazz-cafe-camden-london-21-06-2022/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 09:52:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/live-sorry-wunderhorse-the-jazz-cafe-camden-london-21-06-2022/ It’s a hot and sticky summer Tuesday. The cost of living is oppressive, the prices of utilities are obscene, workers must strike to protest their rights and wages, and the trains entering London and below its streets are silent. The roads are jammed with traffic and the air is laden with fumes. The heat stings […]]]>

It’s a hot and sticky summer Tuesday. The cost of living is oppressive, the prices of utilities are obscene, workers must strike to protest their rights and wages, and the trains entering London and below its streets are silent. The roads are jammed with traffic and the air is laden with fumes. The heat stings with road rage and you cut yourself like knives in your throat.

In the little Jazz Café on the promenade near Dublin Castle, angry young upstarts gather to drink expensive beer and watch punks tear it up.

Apologies if you thought this was accidentally a Pistol review, you’re posting in the wrong place; it’s 2022, not 1976, but this country is still screwed. Get angry, destroy.

However, the drummer of the fictionalized version of sex guns in the aforementioned television program is on the stage before us. Jacob Slateronce of pretty deadis now in its solo incarnation wonder horse, and what stallion it is.

Jacob Slater/Wunderhorse

It couldn’t be further from the beginning of the punk band he represents, although Paul Cook was a competent drummer, as Jacob and the band are virtuosos. On the first pieces of the set, the brilliant ‘Poppy’ and ‘Butterflies’Slater looks like Bruce Springsteen to face the verve around 1993, which is a very good thing. On more moderate efforts such as ‘Teal’and the unplayed single ’17’, there is a start element doveswhich is a nice change of pace between what is an intense and cerebral live performance to the finale of ‘Epilogue’ knocked the doors off their hinges. Quite the opening act. First album Lion cub released in September on Maccabees’ Felix White’s Yala Records label.

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Asha Lorenz/Sorry

If you like to cheat and check previous setlists bands have played while on tour, then you might have seen that sorry debuted with a glut of new songs and this date, which is a delayed night from last November, wraps up a nationwide tour that seems to lead into LP2. For eagle eyes, on the screen above their heads that projected images from videos and other stills throughout the concert, repeatedly displayed a tombstone with a date that remained a little more a long time when the band left the stage. There was a date; 7/10/22, suggesting that’s when the album will arrive. They like to drop subtle hints regularly. At the end of each video treatment, there’s usually a snippet of the next single sped up to comedic heights. This is normally only apparent in retrospect as you have no idea what a new song will sound like.

Unless you’re paying attention tonight, where the handful of new songs break away and add extra emphasis to the ones we’ve known and loved from their debut album, 925 and other singles and EPs.

Unlike previous tours, it feels like Sorry has made a breakthrough. Even at other concerts in the hometown, even though they sold out, some crowd members weren’t completely convinced. Tonight looks like an excited crowd ready for anything. Of course, Sorry never had the chance to shoot their first album. Released on March 27, 2020, the second Friday of the first Covid lockdown, everything that should have happened around the release couldn’t. All visits have been canceled or postponed. They were supposed to play a number of gigs at the end of 2021, but that was pushed back to accommodate the recording of the new LP. And here we are.

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Louis O’Brian/Sorry

Clearly, the time afforded by confinement in our homes has allowed the record to get under people’s skin, cuts like ‘Starstruck’, ‘Perfect’, ‘At Sunset’, ‘Rock ‘n’ Star’ and ‘Lies’ are greeted with joyful abandon. It looks like an event; that Sorry has come to another level of the music industry mountain.

What made it extra special was that the new ones sounded big and fresh with a lighter touch in some cases. Whereas 925 could be dark, a bit seedy and melancholy, ‘Let the Lights On’, ‘Tell Me’, ‘Screaming in the Rain’, ‘Key to the City’ and, of course, the new single, ‘There are so many who want to be loved ‘ were brighter, maybe a bit more pop. It wouldn’t be sorry if there wasn’t a benefit for them yet. ‘Closer’ was classic black-soaked Sorry.

It was a testament to the crowds that they managed to get there at all, even those in the capital couldn’t rely on the metro. There didn’t seem to be a surplus of attendees and it was probably because of, not in spite of, the public transportation issues that everyone wanted to have a good time. It was never in doubt when Sorry took the stage, but even they were apparently thrilled. More of this please. Except for all the pieces of shit outside these walls right now. They can get the hell out of here for good.

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Jazz legend pays tribute to Bill Evans during gig in Taunton https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-legend-pays-tribute-to-bill-evans-during-gig-in-taunton/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-legend-pays-tribute-to-bill-evans-during-gig-in-taunton/ One JAZZ piano legend, John Horler, will pay tribute to another, Bill Evans, in this special live masterclass taking place at Richard Huish College, Taunton. It’s a fantastic opportunity to see one of Britain’s most acclaimed and beloved jazz pianists perform and talk about the music he loves. John Horler and his trio will pay […]]]>

One JAZZ piano legend, John Horler, will pay tribute to another, Bill Evans, in this special live masterclass taking place at Richard Huish College, Taunton.

It’s a fantastic opportunity to see one of Britain’s most acclaimed and beloved jazz pianists perform and talk about the music he loves.

John Horler and his trio will pay homage to Bill Evans, his music and the magic of the groundbreaking trio, some 60 years after the recording of the seminal album Sunday at the Village Vanguard on Riverside Records.

GYA Taunton Center Manager Rachael Parvin said: “We are proud to present the John Horler Trio on their only stop in Somerset on their South West tour.

“They will also perform at Totnes, Dartmouth, Newton Abbot, Bideford and St Ives.

“The event in Taunton promises to be extremely interesting for music lovers of all ages, as John and his musicians will discuss how a jazz trio works and deconstruct and reconstruct the music of Bill Evans.”

Accompanist and musical director of Dame Cleo Laine for 20 years and former member of Sir John Dankworth’s bands, John Horler has played with a ‘who’s who’ of modern jazz – household names like Art Farmer, Chet Baker, Zoot Sims, Maynard Ferguson , Tony Coe, Ronnie Ross, Pete King, Kenny Wheeler and Tommy Whittle.

John Horler began his studies at the Royal Academy of Music at the early age of sixteen and over many years has forged a formidable reputation on the British jazz scene.

Rising through the ranks through pub gigs and BBC Jazz Club appearances, becoming a successful session musician and regularly backing American jazz stars, John Horler is now a highly respected pianist and composer whose music can be found on Diving Duck Recordings.

John Horler will be joined in the masterclass by bassist Ron Phelan and drummer Ronnie Jones.

Ron Phelan studied bass in Dublin before moving to the UK.

He has worked with some of the nation’s finest musicians and performers on national and international tours in projects ranging from jazz ensembles to large-scale theater productions.

He currently lives in the South West of England where he divides his time between performing and composing.

Ronnie is an in-demand jazz drummer and percussionist with appearances on BBC 6 Music, BBC Radio Wales, BBC Radio Cymru and S4C.

He has toured the region with Britain’s greatest jazz musicians and performed at the Welsh Proms, the National Eisteddfod and the Brecon Jazz Festival.

The event will take place on Saturday, June 11 at 1 p.m.

Venue: Guildhall Young Artists Taunton, c/o Richard Huish College, South Road, Taunton TA1 3DZ.

Tickets: £20 at the door (cash/card). Book ahead by email/phone: gyataunton@gsmd.ac.uk 07754217993.

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MacD on music: yes, more of that jazz https://iridiumjazz.com/macd-on-music-yes-more-of-that-jazz/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 09:15:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/macd-on-music-yes-more-of-that-jazz/ It’s been a few weeks since the Jazz Festival, but its spirit lives on in the hearts of music lovers across the city (and at Bennigan’s on Saturday nights, 5-8 p.m.). This week, I’m talking to Ursula McHugh, a regular festival performer and one of the best local jazz singers in town. During our conversation, […]]]>

It’s been a few weeks since the Jazz Festival, but its spirit lives on in the hearts of music lovers across the city (and at Bennigan’s on Saturday nights, 5-8 p.m.).

This week, I’m talking to Ursula McHugh, a regular festival performer and one of the best local jazz singers in town.

During our conversation, Ursula told me about her lifelong love of music, her first band experience and her dream of bringing the jazz club scene back to Derry.

A lifelong music lover, Ursula’s musical journey began when she was a teenager, playing in a band called The Zodiac.

Describing them as “the first Spice Girls,” they practiced every Saturday, perfecting their dance routines and three-part harmonies while singing songs by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, the Eagles and more.

Growing up, the family moved around a lot, moving from Carndonagh to Drogheda, eventually moving to Dublin. Saying there was ‘no music’ there, Ursula was not actively involved in music again until she returned to Derry in 1999.

Returning to the stage, Zodiac began performing at the Derry and Limavady Jazz Festivals, where she is still a regular performer to this day.

Speaking of Derry’s music scene, Ursula says that after almost three years without live music, “it’s great to see the live scene regain the same vibrancy” it had before the big shutdown in March 2020. She singles out Bennigan’s, in particular, as playing a key role in this, talking about how it provides “that constant” with its Saturday night jazz showcases.

Speaking of the Jazz Festival’s recent comeback, she mentions the brilliant team that helped put it all together, specifically mentioning Andrea Campbell, “a mainstay of the festival.”

Ursula recounts how the festival “brings the city to life, with music on the streets, in malls, in cafes and bars” with “something for everyone, from purists to the most laid-back fans”.

In 2012, Ursula launched “Club Cabaret”, a recreation of the classic jazz nightclubs of the thirties and forties.

Paying homage to the often forgotten history of jazz in Derry at this time, Ursula and Co. have recreated the look of these clubs, with “lavish curtains, romantic lighting, tables draped in white linen tablecloths with small lanterns “.

It dates back to when American soldiers were stationed in the city, bringing with them “their musical culture of Broadway (New York, not Creggan), Manhattan and Hollywood.”

This was embraced by the city, Derry’s international reputation becoming such that “local impresario H. B. Phillips hosted famous stars…Paul Robson and Enrico Caruso on the Guildhall stage”.

This kind of scene is something Ursula would like to see back in town, a place where “people can have a cocktail, dance and listen to music”.

The idea behind ‘Club Cabaret’ was to capitalize on ‘the success of the Derry Jazz and Big Band Festival’ and ‘reignite our jazz and swing heritage’. In his words, “Derry has some of the finest jazz, swing and classical musicians in the world”.

Another of Ursula’s shows in recent years was called “Starstruck,” in which she paid tribute to Judy Garland, Barbara Streisand, and Lady Gaga, the leading ladies of “A Star is Born.”

Ursula cites Barbra Streisand and Judy Garland as two of her main influences, as well as her love of classic musicals from an early age.

She remembers one of the first she saw was “The Sound of Music” at the Strand Cinema.

This love traveled with her all her life. A person with eclectic tastes (as the best of us are), she also names among her favorites: Joni Mitchell, Neil Diamond, Carole King, Mary Black, Neil Young and the Carpenters, to name but a few. .

Looking to the future, Ursula is currently working on “a beautiful program with piano and strings” with pianist Dee Doherty, something she “likes to set up and let unfold”, she says.

Unfortunately Ursula couldn’t perform at this year’s Jazz Festival but hopefully she will be back on stage soon.

In the meantime, for those who want to enjoy a little Jazz, go to Bennigan’s from 5 p.m. every Saturday.

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Sligo Jazz Festival 2022 Program Launch / Camilla George Quartet https://iridiumjazz.com/sligo-jazz-festival-2022-program-launch-camilla-george-quartet/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/sligo-jazz-festival-2022-program-launch-camilla-george-quartet/ Sligo Jazz Festival returns July 19-24 – Sligo Jazz Project will launch the official festival program on Wednesday June 15 at the Hawks Well Theatre, which hosts most of the main festival events. The festival program kicks off at 7 p.m. and will be followed at 8 p.m. by a concert in partnership with the […]]]>

Sligo Jazz Festival returns July 19-24 – Sligo Jazz Project will launch the official festival program on Wednesday June 15 at the Hawks Well Theatre, which hosts most of the main festival events. The festival program kicks off at 7 p.m. and will be followed at 8 p.m. by a concert in partnership with the Hawks Well Theater and Music Network, featuring the Camilla George Quartet.

The Quartet includes many stars of the British jazz scene. Camilla’s love for the fusion of African and Western music has made her a unique voice on the international jazz circuit. She will be taking her all-star band to Ireland for an unmissable 10-date tour blending her hypnotic blend of Afrofuturism, hip hop and jazz. She will be joined by Renato Paris (keyboard and vocals), Jihad Darwish (electric bass and double bass) and Rod Youngs (drums). Expect jazz grooves and afrobeat fusions. One not to miss

Sligo Jazz Festival program launch: 7.00pm: Aperitif – all welcome

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The lineup for Sligo Jazz Festival 2022 is as always an eclectic mix of fusion, straight bop, modern and ambient jazz and funk featuring some of the greatest performers from Europe and the USA.

Artist-in-Residence this year, award-winning British composer and bandleader Nikki Iles will perform with a specially assembled jazz orchestra on Thursday 21 July featuring, among others, guitarist Mike Walker, for whom Nikki has written several pieces of music. Also present is her husband Pete Churchill, one of the UK‘s most famous jazz vocal educators and arrangers, so expect him to show up where you least expect it. They are joined by Irish and international artists who make up the largest faculty to date – thirty people – on the summer school.

Norwegian jazz tuba player Daniel Herskedal brings his trio to Ireland for the first time with an exclusive Irish performance on Wednesday July 19, rising star of the New York jazz scene Ashley Pezzotti performs on Friday 22 in one of the many double programs at this year’s festival, an all-star opening night with TRYPL (UK) and a stellar international rhythm section When combined with the annual summer school, the largest and most inclusive of Europe, which takes place at ATU Sligo, this week always offers equal measures of education, entertainment and inspiration. As festival artistic director Eddie Lee says, “There will be hugs! We look forward to welcoming our many summer school attendees back to Sligo after a two year absence of physical events, there will be much love and joy about this year’s events.”

Download the program from www.sligojazz.ie

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Jehnova Releases Video For Jazz-Infused Single ‘Cape Of Good Hope’ https://iridiumjazz.com/jehnova-releases-video-for-jazz-infused-single-cape-of-good-hope/ Tue, 31 May 2022 11:27:55 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jehnova-releases-video-for-jazz-infused-single-cape-of-good-hope/ South African-born, Dublin-based hip-hop artist Jehnova has once again teamed up with producer sivv for a stunning new collaboration. Dublin rapper Jehnova has unveiled the black and white visuals of new track ‘Cape Of Good Hope’, produced by sivv and directed by Brian McGuinness. The low-key, locally shot footage was filmed by David Christopher Lynch […]]]>

South African-born, Dublin-based hip-hop artist Jehnova has once again teamed up with producer sivv for a stunning new collaboration.

Dublin rapper Jehnova has unveiled the black and white visuals of new track ‘Cape Of Good Hope’, produced by sivv and directed by Brian McGuinness.

The low-key, locally shot footage was filmed by David Christopher Lynch and features NUXSENSE, the rap collective featuring Jehnova and her cousin, producer sivv. The couple was born in South Africa, it turns out.

With a shimmering blues piano melody and down-tempo groove, the hip-hop entertainer traces his attempt to retain his motivation for music and the oppression he witnessed in his life.

“I threw the roaches on the shed/Hiding my addiction/I been here looking for music and that was my decision,” he raps. “I stress, but they listen.” He meanders through the roads and streets of Dublin, later merging with his friends in the immersive visuals.

Check out the video for “Cape of Good Hope” below.

Over the past five years or so, Jehnova has released a string of solo singles outside of NUXSENSE, including “Striped Pyjamas”, 2019’s “Eudaemon”, and “Weak Days”.

The Seven Tracks Avenoir released in april 2021 on andfriends records, a joint project with producer lod. Avenoir evokes classic East Coast hip-hop (boom-bap drum loops and prominent samples) with a darker edge that hints at a new form of warped New York rap. The likes of MIKE, Caleb Giles, Slauson Malone and others led the way.

Jehnova’s latest single, “Golden Scepter,” is a sweet, engrossing gem that showcases her lyrical wordplay and laid-back flow.

“My album, Saint Ivy, with my brother sivv is currently in the mastering phase,” the Dublin-based rapper recently told Hot Press for On Our Radar. “Each member of NUXSENSE will be releasing individual albums with sivv, following Time on Earth by Luthorist starting in late 2021. Lod and I are also working on collaborations. I plan to post some great material to connect with the people who have supported me through these years of learning.”

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The very first class SFCM fuses jazz and baroque | Lifestyles https://iridiumjazz.com/the-very-first-class-sfcm-fuses-jazz-and-baroque-lifestyles/ Thu, 26 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-very-first-class-sfcm-fuses-jazz-and-baroque-lifestyles/ In a first-of-its-kind new offering, Roots, Jazz and American Music Executive Director Jason Hainsworth and Historic Performance Chairman Corey Jamason teach improvisation from both a jazz and baroque perspective In partnership with the San Francisco Examiner By Alex Heigl The harpsichord isn’t usually thought of as a particularly swinging instrument, but Corey Jamason and Jason […]]]>

In a first-of-its-kind new offering, Roots, Jazz and American Music Executive Director Jason Hainsworth and Historic Performance Chairman Corey Jamason teach improvisation from both a jazz and baroque perspective

In partnership with the San Francisco Examiner

By Alex Heigl

The harpsichord isn’t usually thought of as a particularly swinging instrument, but Corey Jamason and Jason Hainsworth are here to change that.

Jamason, Director of Historic Performance at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and Hainsworth, Executive Director of Roots, Jazz and American Music, are teaming up to offer SFCM students an all-new class that will focus on improvisation in the seemingly disparate fields of jazz and baroque music. And the class promises another SFCM first: an ensemble combining traditional jazz instruments like saxophones with baroque standbys like the harpsichord. The module was launched the third week of March and hopefully will return to the program.






Executive Director of Roots, Jazz and American Music at SFCM, Jason Hainsworth | Photo: Pug Ma




“One of the beautiful things about this school is the desire to break down ideas about what is meant to be here and what’s meant to be the and bring them together,” Jameson said. “Music is music and musicians can learn a lot from each other, especially about the act of improvisation, which is fundamental to who we are – our true voice.”

“There’s a need for collaboration within the school, but there’s also a need to demystify some of these walls that we naturally put up between jazz musicians and classical musicians,” Hainsworth said. “But we always started from the base of ‘What would be a fun course that we would like to take if we study here?

“For years, since I started working here, Corey and I would just talk, at faculty meetings or in the hallways, about how you teach baroque improvisation to students,” he said. he continued. “How would you teach them to use the very traditional instruments or the figured bass – the typical things Baroque musicians would use to create music in real time.”







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Executive Chairman of Historic Performance at SFCM, Corey Jamason | Photo: Pug Ma




“We talk these days about how we recreate a score,” Jameson said. “And that’s fine and that’s fine and I’m sure Baroque composers would like that, but they expected and wrote in a way that gave room for performers to improvise.”

The overlap between baroque music and jazz may not be obvious to contemporary listeners, but it is substantial. Baroque soloists on any instrument had to add ornaments of their choosing to the melody they were playing, much like a horn player reinterpreting a jazz standard. And there was the practice of continuous bass, in which composers would notate bass parts and expect a harmony instrument (like the harpsichord) to improvise its part from there, which Jamason says is “very similar to this a jazz pianist would do”. He added that Bach was even criticized in his day for notating his parts too strictly and leaving no room for musicians to show their individuality.

Musicians of the time even swung their eighth notes: “French baroque music, if played in steps at a moderate or slow tempo, would often be very similar to swing music,” Jamason said, a quality called “uneven.”







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SFCM Roots, Jazz and American Music Students and Teachers | Photo: Matthew Washburn




“Musicians in these two regions were and are expected to know where they were in a tonal or tonal center and what notes work, what notes don’t work, or which notes lead to where,” Hainsworth said.

“There are also similarities in terms of standard material that jazz musicians know and baroque musicians knew at the time,” he continued. “You could get musicians together and call out a tune and they’d all be expected to know how to play it.”

“We’ve read about baroque-era improvisers, how amazing they were, and it seems far away,” Jamason added. “Because improvisation is a little less present in classical music these days,” he continued, classical musicians can look to jazz musicians to help bridge that distance.

“There’s no bad improvisation: if it’s something that comes from someone’s heart, then it’s real,” added Jamason.

Learn more about the Historical Performance Study or RJAM at SFCM.edu.

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Intense Innovation: Jazz Clubs and the Evolution of Jazz https://iridiumjazz.com/intense-innovation-jazz-clubs-and-the-evolution-of-jazz/ Thu, 19 May 2022 14:21:41 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/intense-innovation-jazz-clubs-and-the-evolution-of-jazz/ In much of the public mind, the jazz club has a somewhat sleazy reputation. The smoky atmosphere after working hours, the bohemian atmosphere, the presence of night owls, gangsters – this stereotype is alive and well in popular culture. While it is true to say that jazz clubs were nightclubs – often of a very […]]]>

In much of the public mind, the jazz club has a somewhat sleazy reputation. The smoky atmosphere after working hours, the bohemian atmosphere, the presence of night owls, gangsters – this stereotype is alive and well in popular culture. While it is true to say that jazz clubs were nightclubs – often of a very rudimentary type – that had music, the film noir imagery conjured up by the phrase “jazz club” obscures the reality of the extraordinary influence of the jazz club on the evolution of jazz, indeed of the music of the 20th century.

Given their origin, it is hardly surprising that jazz clubs have a reputation in public opinion as haunts of vice. The ban began in the WE in 1920 and lasted until 1933. Thousands of saloons were forced to close and gangsters saw an opportunity to manufacture, transport and sell alcohol, and create venues where it could be drunk. The speakeasy was born.

Prohibition did nothing to curb America’s thirst for alcohol, and huge profits were made by those who supplied it – especially if they also controlled the point of sale to customers. In mob-controlled Chicago of the 1920s, dozens of illicit drinking clubs sprang up and competition for patrons was fierce. By providing entertainment, you could attract more customers to your establishment, and jazz, with its dance origins, was the perfect music for the party atmosphere that clubs wanted to foster. To give themselves a competitive edge, clubs wanted to hire the best players, and hugely important figures such as King Oliver, Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington were given a nightly platform to play and develop their music.

Although Prohibition ended in 1933, the jazz club format remained and became a mainstay of American musical life, popping up in every major city and even in cities around the world.

There is no doubt that working conditions were atrocious, especially for black musicians. Long hours in smoky environments, surrounded by drunkenness, in cramped playing conditions, treated like servants, often swindled out of their money by club owners or forced into punitive long-term contracts – but these were the only places where most jazz musicians could find work. However, as harsh as these conditions were, they provided a crucial element for the development of jazz: an environment in which musicians could play every night for many hours and develop their artistry, craftsmanship and physical endurance.

Twenty-two sets per week
It is difficult to assess the length of playing hours in a typical jazz club at this time. The great Benny Golson told me that as teenagers he and John Coltrane stood outside the open window of a jazz club in Philadelphia listening to Charlie Parker, who played five sets of forty-five minutes, 10 p.m. at 2 a.m. This was not uncommon and, at the very least, a band would play three sets per night.

In the 1950s and 1960s, the typical band commitment to a club was at least six nights a week, three sets a night, and two matinees on Saturdays and Sundays from 3 to 6 p.m. This meant that in a typical week, a jazz band played twenty-two sets of music, each set lasting at least fifty minutes. Until the late 1960s, it was in this environment that the most important innovations and developments in jazz took place and were exhibited.

The sheer length of time performers had to perform each night required great physical endurance and ensured the development of powerful instrumental and vocal techniques. The informality of the environment and long playtime encouraged experimentation, and those who came specifically to listen to the music were rewarded by seeing the music evolve right in front of them – in the 1950s you could watch the Miles Davis band with John Coltrane and Bill Evans plays literally inches from you and for several hours, for a relatively modest expense.

Jazz personalities, and the music and styles they created and invented, were associated with specific clubs: Duke Ellington with the Cotton Club in New York in the late 1920s, Count Basie at the Reno Club in Kansas City in the 1930s, Charlie Parker with the clubs on 52n/a Street in New York in the 1940s, Thelonious Monk at Five Spot and Miles Davis at Café Bohemia in the 1950s, and Bill Evans and John Coltrane at the Village Vanguard in the 1960s. And many key live recordings from the 1950s were made in the clubs – Sonny Rollins, Bill Evans and John Coltrane at the Village Vanguard, Thelonious Monk at the Five Spot and Miles Davis at Plugged Nickel.

New York state of mind
If I was offered a trip in a time machine, the period I would choose would be New York in the mid-1960s, because there in the clubs you could see musicians from all jazz eras happen every night. It would have been entirely possible in New York at the time to see Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Cecil Taylor all performing at different clubs. You will be able to witness the full range of music from its origins to the avant-garde.

From the late 1960s, the number of jazz clubs declined as rock music dominated popular consciousness and jazz was no longer seen as economical for club owners. With the loss of this environment came the loss of the platform for extended play and the ability to experiment over a long period of time. Surviving jazz clubs moved to a two-set-per-night format and prices rose. A night at the Village Vanguard, Birdland or Ronnie Scott’s Club doesn’t come cheap these days.

As I write this, I look forward to performing in “New York Frame of Mind”, a three-night, three-set-per-night series with the legendary Dave Liebman – who himself began his career playing in New York jazz clubs in the 1960s. – and with my longtime colleagues my brother Conor and guitarist Mike Nielsen. At Bello Bar in leafy Portobello, we will try to emulate the atmosphere and philosophy of the New York jazz club of the 1960s, with its long playing time and the opportunity for the public to experience the atmosphere intimate environment in which jazz originally developed.

Liebman himself says:

The jazz club of that time was to jazz what the concert hall was to classical music. The ability to play multiple sets of music on successive nights has an effect on the music that cannot be duplicated in any other way. For musicians, they have a chance to stretch, experiment and develop the music over a long period of time. For the public, they discover the intimacy of the jazz club as well as the possibility of seeing the music develop in front of them.

Will we have the stamina over the three nights that our jazz ancestors had? I hope so! Are we going to create something unique for ourselves during this time that we can share with the public? Definitively!

The New York State of Mind concerts, featuring Dave Liebman, Ronan Guilfoyle, Mike Nielsen and Conor Guilfoyle, will take place on May 26, 27 and 28, from 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m., at Bello Bar in Portobello, Dublin 8. Buy your tickets here.

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Jazz Big Band Summer School at Newpark Academy of Music https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-big-band-summer-school-at-newpark-academy-of-music/ Tue, 10 May 2022 11:43:15 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-big-band-summer-school-at-newpark-academy-of-music/ JAZZ BIG BAND SUMMER COURSES Newpark Academy of MusicDates: July 4-10, 2022(each participant will attend three evening classes during the week between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday) COURSE OVERVIEW There is an extensive musical and social history of jazz music and its development, Newpark Academy of Music continues to contribute […]]]>

JAZZ BIG BAND SUMMER COURSES

Newpark Academy of Music
Dates: July 4-10, 2022
(each participant will attend three evening classes during the week between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday)

COURSE OVERVIEW

There is an extensive musical and social history of jazz music and its development, Newpark Academy of Music continues to contribute to this exciting and ever-evolving genre of music. We are delighted to offer music students from all backgrounds the opportunity to apply for our 2022 Big Band Summer Jazz Course.

Participants will establish a solid theoretical and stylistic foundation for improvisation and performance within a large jazz ensemble. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the student’s individual expression and creativity. Led by the highly experienced Big Band Leader & Saxophonist Kieran Wilde, the faculty will also include some of Ireland‘s leading exponents of jazz music; Pianist Scott Flanigan and drummer Kevin Brady.

The last evening of the course will end with a one-hour concert in Newpark performing the repertoire taught during the week. The final recital will also feature critically acclaimed tenor saxophonist and composer Meilana Gillard (USA) as a guest soloist. The Newpark Big Band course is the only course of its type available in Ireland and will give you the tools to improve your ability to perform as a whole and expand your playing opportunities in the future.

For more information, please contact:

e: [email protected]
w:www.newparkmusic.ie
Phone. : +353 1 2883740

Newpark Academy of Music
Newtownpark Avenue, Blackrock,
Co Dublin

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What’s New Guide Bray Jazz Festival 2022 https://iridiumjazz.com/whats-new-guide-bray-jazz-festival-2022/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/whats-new-guide-bray-jazz-festival-2022/ Back for the first time since 2019, excitement is building for the return of the Bray Jazz Festival on the May bank holiday weekend. ringing top quality international music to County Wicklow, the festival returns for its 21st year with a slightly reduced post-pandemic format, coming April 29, 30 and May 1. Performances will take […]]]>

Back for the first time since 2019, excitement is building for the return of the Bray Jazz Festival on the May bank holiday weekend.

ringing top quality international music to County Wicklow, the festival returns for its 21st year with a slightly reduced post-pandemic format, coming April 29, 30 and May 1.

Performances will take place at various venues in Bray and beyond. The festival also includes free events.

Here is what happens:

friday april 29

Mermaid Arts Center (8 p.m.) – Bill Frisell Trio (USA)

The last time the American guitar legend visited Ireland, he packed the 1,200-seat National Concert Hall. It’s no surprise, then, that his visit to the Bray Jazz is already sold out – with a huge waiting list.

Umbra– Guitarist Chris Guilfoyle’s quintet will open for Frisell.

Whale Theatre, Greystones (8 p.m.) – Michael Janisch Band (USA/UK)

Bassist Janisch has become a household name in British jazz since moving to London over 15 years ago. He is a MOBO Award winner and his band includes some of the best young talent in British jazz.

Harbor Bar (8:30 p.m.) – Atsch (Germany/Ireland)

German guitarist Matthias Winkler launches a new album in the opening show of a jam-packed weekend at the Harbor Bar.

Harbor Bar (10:15 p.m.) – Origin Story (Ireland)

The jazz trio whose 2020 debut album ‘Good Friday’ was The Irish Times’ Irish Jazz Album of that year.

O’Sullivans Bar, Castle St (8.30pm) – Leo Osio and Antonello D’Orazio

A duo composed of a Venezuelan pianist and an Italian saxophonist will perform.

Hibernia Bar, Strand Road (9.30pm) – Denny Bugle

Audiences can enjoy jazz with Denny Bugle.

Saturday April 30

Town hall of Bray (council room) 10:30 a.m. – Jazz workshop

This event will share tips and tricks for playing jazz, funk and swing grooves with the Michael Janisch Band.

Mermaid Arts Center (2:30 p.m.) Birth of the Cool Octet by Conor Guilfoyle (Ireland)

Drummer Guilfoyle recreates the ‘cool jazz’ sounds of the American West Coast.

Town Hall of Bray, (6:30 p.m.) – Renaud Garcia Fons and Claire Antonini (France)

The world-renowned bass and oriental music maestro explores sounds from the Baroque to the Arabian Peninsula.

Harbor Bar (6:30 p.m.) – Andrea Jones Quartet (Ireland)

The young jazz saxophonist is joined by some of the freshest young talent in Irish jazz for an evening of first class entertainment.

Mermaid Arts Center (8 p.m.) – Yazz Ahmed Quartet (UK)

The exciting new star of London’s urban jazz, trumpeter Ahmed is the headliner on Saturday night. She’s making a welcome first visit to Irish shores for her performance at Bray’s arts venue, which is sure to be a highlight of this year’s festival.

Randy Ingram Trio (USA/Ireland) will open for Ahmed.

Harbor Bar (8:30 p.m.) – Aoife Doyle Band (Ireland)

The Bray-born singer is making a welcome visit to her hometown with her excellent new album.

Harbor Bar (10:15 p.m.) – Latin Swing Quintet (Venezuala/Ireland)

Audiences can expect driving Latin sounds from this superb Dublin-based combo.

Hibernia Inn, Strand Road (9:30 p.m.,) Firm Roots

Combo led by ex-Hothouse Flower Jerry Fehily

Sunday May 1

Mermaid Arts Center (2:30 p.m.) – Ilaria Capalbo Quintet

This is the first Irish visit for the sensational young Italian bassist and her great Swedish band.

Powerscourt Distillery, Enniskerry (2pm) – Loco Swing (Ireland/Italy)

Enjoy an afternoon of combo music led by Italian saxophonist Antonello D’Orazio.

Powerscourt Distillery, Enniskerry (3.30pm) – Luisa Annibali Band (Ireland/Italy)

The Italian singer will play jazz, neo soul and Latin.

Harbor Bar (6:30 p.m.) – Shane Latimer Quartet with Thomas Backman (Ireland/Sweden)

Guitarist Latimer and his band featuring Swedish saxophonist Backman will perform at the popular Bray Hall.

Bray Town Hall (6:30 p.m.) – Ariel Bart Trio (Israel/Japan)

Enjoy a performance by the young harmonica prodigy with a trio of cellist and piano

Mermaid Arts Center (8 p.m.) – Tord Gustavsen Trio (Norway)

The pianist Gustavsen is one of the great stars of Scandinavian jazz.

Carole Nelson Trio (Ireland) will open for Gustavsen before her performance at the Mermaid Arts Centre.

Harbor Bar (8:30 p.m.) – Tudo Bem (Ireland/Brazil)

Discover the sounds of Brazilian jazz from this dazzling quintet

Harbor Bar (10:15 p.m.) – Richie Buckley Quartet (Ireland)

Irish saxophonist Buckley is one of the giants of Irish jazz and this is sure to be an evening of entertainment not to be missed.

Hibernia Inn, Strand Road (9.30pm) – Danny Tobin Blues Band (Ireland)

Bray blues guitarist Tobin leads his combo

O’Sullivan’s Bar, Castle Street – Orlando Molino Duo (Venezuela)

The South American guitarist is sure to wow audiences with Latin sounds.

Monday, May 2

Wicklow Wolf Visitor Centre, Newtownmountkennedy (3.30pm) – Aaron Murphy Quintent

Combo led by emerging Irish jazzman Murphy

Wicklow Wolf Visitor Centre, Newtownmountkennedy (5pm) – Charlie Mooney Sextet

Six-piece band led by guitarist Mooney, who will also release their new album.

For tickets and more, go to brayjazz.com

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Anticipation is building for the 21st Bray Jazz Festival https://iridiumjazz.com/anticipation-is-building-for-the-21st-bray-jazz-festival/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/anticipation-is-building-for-the-21st-bray-jazz-festival/ Musicians and music lovers look forward to a weekend of jazz with some of the biggest names in international and Irish jazz heading to Bray on the May bank holiday weekend. Stemming from the annual music calendar since 2019 – when the coronavirus pandemic forced the cancellation of live events across the world – the […]]]>

Musicians and music lovers look forward to a weekend of jazz with some of the biggest names in international and Irish jazz heading to Bray on the May bank holiday weekend.

Stemming from the annual music calendar since 2019 – when the coronavirus pandemic forced the cancellation of live events across the world – the festival is making a welcome return with a jam-packed schedule of events starting Friday 29 April and continuing throughout over the May bank holiday weekend.

As festival organizers report unprecedented early booking of shows throughout the weekend, the appetite for the festival’s return is shared not just by the public who will descend on North Wicklow for the 21st event annual.

The Irish jazz community has also hailed the return of the Bray Jazz Festival after a three-year absence.

Jazz critic Ian Patterson of All About Jazz says few in this part of the world would disagree that the Bray Jazz Festival has established itself “not just as one of the essential music festivals on the Irish calendar , but as a jazz festival of international stature”. reputation.”

Bassist and composer Ronan Guilfoyle, director of the Center for Jazz Performance at Dublin City University, said of the festival’s return that Bray Jazz had always provided a platform for musical performance at the highest level.

“Jazz is ultimately about live performance – the recordings are great, but only approximate the live experience. As a young musician, my life was changed by seeing great performers in person, and seeing the best perform live is a rite of passage and inspiration for all jazz musicians,” he said.

“Bray Jazz has always provided a platform for music performance at the highest level, and it’s so great to see him back. Once again, Irish audiences will be able to savor the music in their natural surroundings, and I’m sure we will all once again be delighted, entertained and inspired. Welcome Bray, it’s been too long!

Drummer Kevin Brady described the Bray Jazz Festival as one of the most important musical events in Ireland, and added that the festival was “an integral platform which then brings together the national and international jazz music community“.

“Bray Jazz gives Irish audiences the opportunity to experience what’s going on in jazz. I’m thrilled to be part of this year’s festival and will be performing at the Mermaid Arts Center with American pianist Randy Ingram and bassist Dave Redmond,” he added.

Pianist Greg Felton, whose band ‘Origin Story’ will play Bray Jazz at Harbor Bar on Friday, April 29, has loyal festival members, saying the festival gave him a tremendous career-starting opportunity, when his band opened for legendary American saxophonist Steve Coleman in 2003.

Of Shankill, Felton says he had just graduated from Newpark Jazz School and that gig at the Mermaid Arts Center was “a really big deal for us”.

He later recalled bringing his then six-year-old daughter to a masterclass the festival held with New York trumpeter Dave Douglas a decade later. “He had her play the trumpet and answer questions, it was a wonderful experience for her. I also received pearls of wisdom that day which I continually use in composing and teaching,” recalls- he.

Latin jazz drummer and bandleader Conor Guilfoyle also has fond memories of the Bray Jazz Festival, recalling that he led his big band “Night in Havana Orchestra” on the main stage of the first-ever Bray Jazz Festival, when landmark concerts were held at Ardmore Film Studios, as the Mermaid Arts Center had yet to be built.

“I’ve been lucky enough to play jazz festivals all over the world, so having one of this quality on my doorstep is such a gift. The organization, atmosphere and spirit of everyone involved is on par with anything you will find in the world.

“The past two years have been incredibly difficult for musicians, so seeing Bray Jazz come back is a sign that we’re finally on our way back to normality,” he said.

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