Germany – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:33:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Germany – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 Inntöne Tastenfestival/Keyboard Festival (Austria) – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/inntone-tastenfestival-keyboard-festival-austria-london-jazz-news/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:33:06 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/inntone-tastenfestival-keyboard-festival-austria-london-jazz-news/ Inntöne Keyboard Festival (Diersbach, Austria. June 3-5, 2022. Summary by Oliver Weindling) Paul Zauner, founder and artistic director of the Inntöne Festival, having moved the dates of the main festival to July a few years ago, added a smaller three-day festival dedicated to the keyboard. The combinations ranged from solo to numerous duos, up to, […]]]>

Inntöne Keyboard Festival

(Diersbach, Austria. June 3-5, 2022. Summary by Oliver Weindling)

Paul Zauner, founder and artistic director of the Inntöne Festival, having moved the dates of the main festival to July a few years ago, added a smaller three-day festival dedicated to the keyboard. The combinations ranged from solo to numerous duos, up to, finally, a few quartets. “Keyboard” is used in the broadest sense: mostly piano, but with some accordion, in different combinations, and also, more exceptionally, the clavitone (which we’ll discuss later).

Cynics warned in advance of possible repetitiveness or lack of diversity. In the end, the festival had proven them wrong. Biggest credit to Zauner for his imagination and commitment to having this on his family farm.

Fergus McCreadie. Photo © Patrick Spanko

The weekend was booked by two British acts, starting with the Fergus McCreadie Trio. The trio were making up for having had to pull out of the festival in 2021, due to Covid restrictions, and they have certainly made up for any delays. Echoes of Scottish folk melody, with imaginative use of drums more like impressionistic percussion sounds, had the audience moving and tapping their feet.

Then, the British group that closed the festival on Sunday evening was the lively and extraordinarily capable duo of Liam Noble and Paul Clarivismainly performing a version of West Side Story. As you would expect from such musicians, there was a fascinating interplay (and indeed I had first heard them over 20 years ago) and, unsurprisingly given their pedigrees in groups like Orquestra Mahatma and Pigfoot, lots of smiles and humor.

Otto Lechner, Arnault Methevier. Photo © Patrick Spanko

The accordion was another feature of the festival, certainly a Zauner love since over the years at least one accordionist has featured in the main festival. The first evening we had the great contrast of the two accordions of Arnault Methevier (“Nano”) and Otto Lechner, respectively from France and Austria. Beginning with a beat that sounded like a clock ticking, they started riffing and tearing around him. Most of the time, Lechner was a kind of lead guitar, wildly improvising and bending notes and chords, while Nano was more like rhythm guitar, able to change time signature and rhythm.

Finally on the first night we had the sophisticated melodist Enrico Pieranunzi. Seen only a few times in the UK, he recorded with the late Tina May, for whom he expressed the greatest praise and sadness to me. For his first track, it seemed to be based on a Bartokian folk song, but you could also feel the influence of Scarlatti, on which Pieranunzi worked a lot, and also the supreme melodic hook of the great Italian film composers , like Nino Rota and Enrico Morricone. He made the resort so easy and responsive. Pure elegance.

We had the chance to hear some musicians more than in different formations. The first to do so was almost accidental, as Fergus McCreadie had to replace Allesandro d’Alessandro who had Covid. But we didn’t lose anything at all – the set showed a totally different side of him compared to the trio. It felt much more personal, with him showing immense technique and perhaps echoes of Rachmaninoff and Chopin. McCreadie’s two performances were a great appetizer for the next couple of years when he has big opportunities as a BBC Next Generation artist.

Another British duo to appear was that of Xhosa Cole on the saxophone and Deschanel Gordon at the piano. They are of course the latest winners of the BBC Young Jazz Musician award, but both are making their debut as leaders in Central Europe. And, although almost unknown to the Austrian public, they revealed themselves with great panache, energy and modesty, in a program mainly based on standards, but ending with an original by Gordon. Cole’s version of Midnight Tower particularly stood out. And their engaging personalities have made them many new friends.

Another to appear twice was the pianist Elias Stemeseder, originally from Salzburg but now residing in Berlin notably as a member of Jim Black’s trio. One of his two performances was with Georg Vogel, also from Salzburg and inventor of the clavitone, on two pianos. (Great to see two life-size Bösendorfer pianos in a barn!) With great panache and empathy, they seemed to show the influence of many imaginative 20th-century composers, such as John Cage and Morton Feldman, but without letting go. become too academic.

Stemeseder also performed with a tenor Philip Gropper from Berlin. With tracks built from Gropper’s larger band, Philm, we got to appreciate their dialogue and in-depth knowledge of each other, Gropper’s use of extended techniques, while Stemeseder could use keyboards and samples to add extra color.

Alex Correa and Christoph Schweizer. Photo © Patrick Spanko

The range and diversity of so much of the festival was almost a relief to discover straighter jazz formations, including the Swiss trombonist’s Brazilian quartet Christopher Schweizer and the quartet of Stephane Belmondo and Kirk Lightsey, that I saw recently in Graz. Both, however, showing imagination.

And now for the Clavitone! The Clavitone is a keyboard capable of playing this George Vogel developed by inventing a new scale with 31 notes in the octave. The microtones of his trio allow us to hear harmonics and beats, as well as sounding like instruments such as the clavichord that aren’t “well tempered”. But there was humor behind the serious intent. And it reminded me a bit of the attitude and the joy of going there many weekend performances.

The concept of this specialized festival was a plus for us, and an experience for Paul Zauner. By keeping the audience lower, it meant we could properly focus on the music inside, which was difficult in the past. His infectious personality and commitment have shown like never before, and let’s see if he’s happy enough to keep it that way. In the meantime, we can look forward to its festival at the end of July, which this year includes the tastes of Hermeto Pascoal and Manhattan transfer.

The first two days of the keyboard festival will be broadcast over the next few months on Austrian radio.

LINK: Inntoene website

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Peter Brötzmann/Fred Van Hove/Han Bennink: Jazz in the Kammer No. 71 (Trost) https://iridiumjazz.com/peter-brotzmann-fred-van-hove-han-bennink-jazz-in-the-kammer-no-71-trost/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 16:14:47 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/peter-brotzmann-fred-van-hove-han-bennink-jazz-in-the-kammer-no-71-trost/ It was breathtaking when Jimmy Fallon ridiculed Peter Brötzmann on national television. Last year, apropos of nothing, the chuckling ‘Slow Jam the News’ purveyor took it upon himself to compile a ‘Do Not Play List’, which included the German saxophonist’s seminal 1969 album Nipples. How Fallon grimaced; how he backed away from the twisted, jagged […]]]>

It was breathtaking when Jimmy Fallon ridiculed Peter Brötzmann on national television. Last year, apropos of nothing, the chuckling ‘Slow Jam the News’ purveyor took it upon himself to compile a ‘Do Not Play List’, which included the German saxophonist’s seminal 1969 album Nipples. How Fallon grimaced; how he backed away from the twisted, jagged solo.

Brötzmann didn’t take it personally; he took it with amusement and perplexity. However, this titan does not laugh. For over 55 years, Brötzmann has created deeply intellectual and rebellious art on his own terms, something very few can say they have done.

Now we have more with Jazz in the Kammer Nr. 71– and if you think of pseudo-intellectual austerity when you think of free jazz, you’re in the wrong place. From top to bottom, this April 1974 concert in Berlin with Brötzmann on tenor sax and clarinet, Fred van Hove on piano and Han Bennink on drums and percussion is smart, wild and wickedly fun – less akin to free jazz that Jerry Lee Lewis’ Live at the Star Club.

From the unbridled “Schwarzspecht” to the jagged “Der Mammutzahn aus Balve” to the cranial “Involved”, Jazz in the Kammer is as good an entry into Brötzmann’s singular universe as any: let your ears relax and it’s purely anarchic, uncompromising art, not the stuff of pugnacious Discog salesmen vying for bent corners.

Plus, it’s worth hearing even if your usual tastes stray from that sphere, if only for the fact that the world is becoming more streamlined, corporatized, and linear by the day. Which makes our real weirdos, like Brötzmann, more interesting than ever.

Learn more about Jazz in the Kammer Nr. 71 at Amazon and Apple Music!

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Ella Fitzgerald, Ronnie Foster, Bill Charlap and More: Jazz Week https://iridiumjazz.com/ella-fitzgerald-ronnie-foster-bill-charlap-and-more-jazz-week/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 15:24:26 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/ella-fitzgerald-ronnie-foster-bill-charlap-and-more-jazz-week/ Jazz Week is your roundup of new and remarkable stories from the world of jazz. It’s a one-stop destination for music news you need to know. Let’s take it from the top. Outstanding First recording of Wadada Leo Smith’s string quartets: TUM will release the very first recording of Wadada Leo Smith String Quartets Nos. […]]]>

Jazz Week is your roundup of new and remarkable stories from the world of jazz. It’s a one-stop destination for music news you need to know. Let’s take it from the top.

Outstanding

First recording of Wadada Leo Smith’s string quartets: TUM will release the very first recording of Wadada Leo Smith String Quartets Nos. 1 to 12. The 7-disc collection includes twelve string quartets written by the Pulitzer-winning composer from 1965 and are performed by the RedKoral Quartet, along with featured soloists. “My aspiration was to create a body of music that was expressive and also explored the African-American experience in the United States of America,” Smith states in the liner notes.

Previously unreleased Ella Fitzgerald concert on exclusive Purple Splatter vinyl: As previously announced, Verve will release a never-before-seen concert by Ella Fitzgerald, featuring the First Lady of Song performing live versions of selections from her now classic album. Ella Fitzgerald sings Irving Berlin’s songbook at the Hollywood Bowl on August 16, 1958. The label also announced that Ella At The Hollywood Bowl: The Irving Berlin Songbook will also release the record on exclusive purple splatter vinyl. The album will be released on June 24.

Two upcoming albums by the Gordon Grdina trio: Oud master Gordon Grdina will release two new adventurous trio albums on June 17. The first is Boiling point, released via Astral Spirits, is the second release from his acclaimed Nomad Trio featuring pianist Matt Mitchell and drummer Jim Black. The second, Journeyreleased via Attaboygirl, is his collaboration with pianist Matthew Shipp and bassist Mark Helias.

Ronnie Foster returns to Blue Note Records: The great Ronnie Foster organ will be released To restart via Blue Note, his first album in 36 years. The new album, due out July 15, is a nine-song affair dedicated to the memory of the much-missed Dr. Lonnie Smith, whom Foster dubs via a statement “the world’s best on the Hammond B3 organ.” The album also comes in the 50th anniversary year of his seminal 1976 debut with Blue Note, Two-Headed Freapavailable now on vinyl.

New and upcoming albums

Chad Fowler and Matthew Shipp, old stories (Mahakala): Saxophonist Chad Fowler blends his Southern and R&B influence with pianist Matthew Shipp’s unique brand of modern improvisation on their first duet recording, old stories. This session was completely improvised and the duets on the record document their first real interaction. old stories was released on April 15.

Mike Holober and Balancing Act, Do not let go (Sunny side): Pianist/composer Mike Holober, best known for his work with larger ensembles, released a two-disc live recording with his octet Balancing Act on April 15 via Sunnyside Records. Do not let go is a 14-part song cycle divided into two sets, recorded in October 2019 at Aaron Davis on the campus of the City College of New York, where, as Holober puts it, “the fruits of the collective go hand in hand with the leadership of the group and personal artistic goals.

Ches Smith, Interpret it well (Pyroclastic): Interpret it well is a new album from drummer/vibraphonist/composer Ches Smith featuring an all-star quartet of guitarist Bill Frisell, violist Mat Maneri and pianist Craig Taborn. The disc was released on May 6 via Pyroclastic Records and features superb explorations of Smith’s ethereal compositions.

DaShawn Hickman, Drums, Roots & Steel (Small Village Foundation): DaShawn Hickman, one of today’s greatest Sacred Steel players, channels the blues-gospel traditions of 1930s Pentecostal-holy churches on his debut album. Drums, Roots & Steelreleased on June 2, is produced by Charlie Hunter, also present on bass, alongside two West African percussionists, Atiba Rorie and Brevan Hampden, and singer Wendy Hickman.

Live music and festival news

Jazz Power Institute 2022 from Jazz Power Initiative: The Jazz Power Initiative’s two-day Jazz Power Institute for Artists and Educators will return in-person July 6-7 to Lehman College, City University of New York, in the Bronx. This year’s theme is ‘Jazz Future’, including engaging students and creating new avenues for learning about music and the arts in general. Additional information and registration here.

Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival, September 16-18: The Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival, produced by the August Wilson African American Culture Center, will take place September 16-18. The festival lineup includes artists ranging from Ron Carter, Stanley Clarke, the Average White Band and more established big names, as well as rising stars like Samara Joy with the Pasquale Grasso Trio and more.

Bill Charlap Trio Celebrate Leonard Bernstein’s Musical Theater Legacy at NJPAC: The Bill Charlap Trio will celebrate Leonard Bernstein’s legacy in musical theater with a special event at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center (NJPAC) on June 17. The event is part of NJPAC’s Concert Conversations, hosted by theater insider Ted Chapin, and also features Leonard’s daughter, Jamie, shares stories and childhood memories from her book, Famous Father’s Daughter: A Memoir of Growing Up Bernstein. More here.

Michele Rosewoman returns to Dizzy’s Club with New Yor-Uba, June 29-30: Pianist Michele Rosewoman returns to Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Dizzy’s Club June 29-30. She will perform with her longtime and acclaimed New Yor-Uba ensemble, which has been a major forum for collaboration between masters of the world of contemporary jazz and Cuban folk music for nearly four decades. Tickets here.

Smoke Jazz Club reopens: The Smoke Jazz Club in New York is set to reopen for the first time in more than two years. A celebration event of the reopening and expansion is scheduled for July 21-24 with music from the George Coleman Quartet. “The Smoke Jazz Club has so much history,” says co-owners Paul Stache and Molly Sparrow Johnson, husband and wife. “Despite the struggles of the past few years, we knew the music couldn’t stop there. The past two years have not been easy for anyone, but having live music in the club again with everyone together, musicians and listeners, seems like a turning point. We are very excited to take this next step.

Django Reinhardt NY Festival at Birdland: The Django Festival Allstars return for their annual tour to New York City’s Birdland jazz club July 12-17, for six nights of performances dubbed the Django Reinhardt NY Festival. These shows will include several guests, such as Ken Peplowski, James Carter, Houston Person, Edmar Castaneda and John DiMartino. Other American performances by the Django Festival Allstars are planned to follow this Birdland event.

Featured photo by Jen Rosenstein.

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Key words:
Bill Charlap, Chad Fowler, Ches Smith, DaShawn Hickman, Django Reinhardt, Ella Fitzgerald, Gordon Grdina, Jazz Power Institute, Leonard Bernstein, Matthew Shipp, Mike Holober, Ronnie Foster, Wadada Leo Smith
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Jazz comes to Bloomfield Church for June 11 concert – Essex News Daily https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-comes-to-bloomfield-church-for-june-11-concert-essex-news-daily/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 13:25:01 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-comes-to-bloomfield-church-for-june-11-concert-essex-news-daily/ Photo courtesy of Brian NalepkaMiss Maybell & Her Ragged Jazz Band, including, left to right, Charlie Judkins; Lauren Sansaricq, aka Miss Maybell; and Brian Nalepka, will perform music from the early 20th century at Brookdale Reformed Church on June 11. BLOOMFIELD, NJ – Traditional jazz, ragtime and blues come to Bloomfield on Saturday, June 11, […]]]>
Photo courtesy of Brian Nalepka
Miss Maybell & Her Ragged Jazz Band, including, left to right, Charlie Judkins; Lauren Sansaricq, aka Miss Maybell; and Brian Nalepka, will perform music from the early 20th century at Brookdale Reformed Church on June 11.

BLOOMFIELD, NJ – Traditional jazz, ragtime and blues come to Bloomfield on Saturday, June 11, when Miss Maybell & Her Ragged Jazz Band will play a fundraiser at Brookdale Reformed Church, 16 Bellevue Ave. Usually a trio, the band added a reed player for show, with regular and resident Bloomfield player Brian Nalepka on bass and tuba.

“The band plays music that nobody covers,” Nalepka said in a June 6 phone interview. “This is the era of ragtime, from 1900 to 1929, and popular songs and instrumentals will be performed.”

The musicians on Saturday are Lauren Sansaricq, alias Miss Maybell, on banjo, guitar and washboard; Charlie Judkins on piano; Dan Levinson on clarinet and saxophone; and Nalepka. Familiar names from this bygone era are Bing Crosby, Sophia Tucker, Al Jolson, Irving Berlin and Scott Joplin.

“Things go in a cycle,” Nalepka said. “We are not in a cover of these songs. In the 70s, with the movie “The Sting”, songs from that era became popular. Now that we’re in the 2020s, maybe we’ll hear 20s music again.”

During the first decades of the last century, Nalepka said there was significant nightclub life; radio was just beginning and television did not exist.

“Back then, music was played for singing and dancing,” he said, “until you got to bebop music in the 1940s. It was more for listening and more popular with musicians and the general public.

Miss Maybell & Her Ragged Jazz Band, as a trio, have been playing together for about three years, said Nalepka, who grew up in Clifton and attended Clifton High School. Nalepka’s first instrument was the accordion, which he started playing when he was 7 years old. He started the tuba at the age of 12 and played in his high school marching band. He has been a professional musician since 1974 and has resided in Bloomfield since 1993. He is married to Mary Shaughnessy, the former chair of the Bloomfield Board of Education. The next concert will last, according to Nalepka, about 90 minutes.

“We talk about the songs we play, not to bore us, but from the bottom,” he said. “It’s good to educate people about the origin of music.”

Nalepka said the band are always discovering “new” songs. Some are film scores from the silent era, when films were accompanied by live orchestras, and others are from sheet music found in flea markets and antique shops. Online research is another source.

Miss Maybell & Her Ragged Jazz Band will play at 4 p.m. Fees will be charged.

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Smoke Jazz Club reopens after pandemic hiatus, bigger and better https://iridiumjazz.com/smoke-jazz-club-reopens-after-pandemic-hiatus-bigger-and-better/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/smoke-jazz-club-reopens-after-pandemic-hiatus-bigger-and-better/ The last time musicians performed for an audience inside the Smoke Jazz Club on Broadway on 106th Street was in mid-March 2020. Kevin Hays was on piano, Ron Carter on bass and Al Foster on drums. “At the time,” says Smoke founder Paul Stache, “it was clear there was a pretty serious virus circling around […]]]>

The last time musicians performed for an audience inside the Smoke Jazz Club on Broadway on 106th Street was in mid-March 2020. Kevin Hays was on piano, Ron Carter on bass and Al Foster on drums. “At the time,” says Smoke founder Paul Stache, “it was clear there was a pretty serious virus circling around the world. And looking at the band – Ron is over 80, Al is almost 80 – we were all holding our breath. But we spent the weekend and luckily no one got sick.

Then New York went into lockdown and places in the city went dark. Every day, as the weeks turned into months, Stache would go check out the club, where Carter’s bass amp and Foster’s drums and cymbals were still on stage. “It was eerily quiet,” he recalled. “And I kept thinking, I wonder if this was the last show we were going to do here?”

Today we can officially perish the thought, as the Smoke Jazz Club announces its grand reopening. The club will host NEA Jazz Master and tenor saxophonist George Coleman with his quartet, as well as guest guitarist Peter Bernstein, from Thursday July 21 to Sunday July 24. (Buy your tickets here.)

Paul Stache and Molly Sparrow Johnson, co-owners of Smoke Jazz & Supper Club, pictured in May 2022.

More than a return to form, the engagement will serve as an unveiling for Smoke’s substantial and long-awaited renovation. One afternoon last week, Stache and Molly Sparrow Johnson — the club’s husband and wife co-owners — sat at a table not far from the stage, which is nearly 40 square feet larger than before. The room itself, with its exposed brick walls and pressed tin ceiling, seemed noticeably more spacious; a long banquette replaced the former bar, which now resides in a separate, adjacent lounge. The number of seats has almost doubled.

“The goal initially was to create a room that was a bit more pandemic-proof,” Stache said. “Where the stage is large enough for a trio or quartet to play without literally being neck and neck, in a room set up so that tables can be divided and capacity reduced, if necessary. With a larger kitchen where our staff can work safely, and a ventilation system that brings in and circulates fresh air.

During my visit, the contractors had their hands full on what is still an active site; most of the surfaces of the future living room were covered with a layer of construction dust. But the improvements to the venue — that larger stage, stand-alone bar, relocated bathroom and kitchen access, vastly expanded kitchen itself — were obvious to someone who was a customer. since the beginning, 23 years ago. That it took the stress test of a pandemic to put these improvements in place is, as they say, just one of those things.

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When Smoke Jazz & Supper Club opened on April 9, 1999, it was seen as a welcome new addition to the New York jazz ecology – but also as a sequel. For more than 20 years, beginning in the mid-1970s, the venue was known as Augie’s Jazz Bar, an adorably scruffy neighborhood eatery. (Bernstein was among the musicians who cut their teeth there.)
Stache, who grew up in Berlin, Germany, stumbled across the place on the first night of a visit to New York in 1992 and never got over it. “Junior Cook and Cecil Payne were here,” he says, “and I can’t think of a more special introduction to New York. The place was packed and there was a thick layer of smoke hanging about eight feet in the middle of the room. The music was just amazing.

He harassed Augie’s namesake owner Augusto Cuartas for any job he could get, starting as a dishwasher and eventually becoming a bartender before moving on. When Augie suddenly closed in 1998, Stache approached the landlord and arranged to pay back the rent by taking over the lease. Smoke has made its mark as a decidedly more grown-up successor to Augie’s, while maintaining the scale of the venue. Its opening act was the George Coleman Quartet, with Harold Mabern.

Smoke Jazz Club

As Stache recalls, Coleman also reopened the club after the World Trade Center attacks of September 11, 2001 — one of the few major disruptive events that Smoke has weathered over the years. Our COVID era is unique for a number of reasons, of course. One being the fact that it happened so abruptly and one-sidedly, at least in New York, and was so choppy and uneven in its recovery.

Like some other top jazz clubs, Smoke turned to video during the pandemic: you might remember the Smoke Screens stream, featuring bands (scrupulously masked, then masked and vaxxed) playing for the cameras in an empty room. Some of them have produced lasting documents; Orrin Evans released an album for affiliate label Smoke Sessions, The magic of the moment out of a live concert. Hays became one of his livestreams, featuring bassist Ben Street and drummer Billy Hart, in a Smoke Sessions version called All things are. (I wrote the liner notes.)

For a time in the summer of 2020, Smoke also operated as a sidewalk cafe, with groups settling right inside open windows facing Broadway. Around this time, Stache and Johnson sat down with an architect friend to carefully assess the club’s floor plan and dimensions, in light of the social distancing guidelines that had been issued. “We came to the conclusion that 14 people could be in this room,” Johnson said. “And we just had this moment where we realize it’s not going to work. And I don’t know if it will work again. That’s when it became very clear that these two neighboring spaces should be part of Smoke. There was no other way to survive here in this space otherwise.

These two spaces next door used to be a law firm and a dry cleaner, but both had been vacant for years – long before COVID. Smoke’s landlord had previously welcomed the idea of ​​having Stache and Johnson take over the lease. Now, after a period of pandemic leniency with rent, that expansion finally made some burning sense.

“Over the years in this small space, we always had the idea that maybe we should be bigger – but that was one of the things we sort of dreamed about: maybe it’s a good idea, maybe it’s not,” says Stache. “When the pandemic came, it kind of became a necessity. It wasn’t really a choice anymore.”

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Jazz clubs have struggled, as have jazz musicians, due to pandemic pressures. Some, like the Jazz Standard at the end of 2020 and 55 Bar last month, have closed for the foreseeable future. Smoke’s return is therefore good news for the New York scene, especially for fans of mainstream modern jazz swing. Its renewed shape represents good news of a different kind.

Portrait of Harold Mabern in Smoke

A portrait of pianist Harold Mabern on a bench at Smoke, in May 2022.

The old Smoke had a few quirks that added character but detracted from a listening experience. A support post, for example, which bisected part of the stage – now located more to the side. The bathroom is no longer next to the stage, which means no one will disturb a bass solo, or a ballad, with the sound of a toilet flushing. The swinging kitchen door, with its banging sound and flood of light, is also a thing of the past.

“I’m really thrilled to have a designated listening room,” says Johnson, “built to spec for optimal sound, with an all-new audio system from Meyer.”

The living room next door is another substantial upgrade. “It will be an inviting way to welcome people,” adds Johnson. “Like, ‘Come in and have a drink while you wait,’ instead of ‘Please stand under the scaffolding while you wait.’ And there’s always been people in the neighborhood who say, “I love your space. I just want to come in and have a drink. And I love that we can do that now; we can accommodate these people. at the end of the day, it’s about welcoming people and making our customers happy.

Getting there took a lot longer than Team Smoke had anticipated. At the height of the pandemic, demolition permits came easily; building permits, not so much. What usually took a few weeks ended up taking four or five months. Thus, the club was stripped down to the posts, unsuitable even for a livestream, and caught in limbo.

“Then somehow the building permit was obtained, and we found ourselves in a situation where all the contractors we had lined up were obviously on other sites,” says Stache. “So we had to start from scratch. And then the steel supply was a problem. So it was a combination of supply chain issues and a municipal bureaucracy that wasn’t really moving.

Now that the reopening is fast approaching, Smoke is preparing to pick up the pace. After Coleman, it will feature the Bobby Watson Quartet (July 28-31); Louis Hayes & The Cannonball Legacy Band (August 4-7); Mary Stallings (August 11-14); and the Mike LeDonne Sextet (August 18-21).

The club’s usual anniversary tribute to Charlie Parker will be led by Rudresh Mahanthappa, with his trio (August 25-28). Next are the Al Foster Quintet, in a celebration of the Smoke Sessions album release (September 1-4); the Eddie Henderson Quintet (September 8-11); the Vijay Iyer Trio (September 15-18); and the collective One For All (September 22-25).

During this recent visit, a framed portrait of Coleman sat on one of the benches at the club. In this room, it functioned as both a respectful celebration of the past and a tantalizing promise for the future.

For more information on Smoke’s reopening, visit their website.

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Jazz pop singer-songwriter Steven Blane releases new album that reflects a variety of themes, genres and with a Jewish thread https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-pop-singer-songwriter-steven-blane-releases-new-album-that-reflects-a-variety-of-themes-genres-and-with-a-jewish-thread/ Mon, 30 May 2022 10:05:07 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-pop-singer-songwriter-steven-blane-releases-new-album-that-reflects-a-variety-of-themes-genres-and-with-a-jewish-thread/ Light-hearted and relatable, the lyrics advise that “happiness can be found cheap, but it can be quite expensive to keep.” This thread of humor runs throughout the album and all of Blane’s work. NEW YORK (WEB PR) May 30, 2022 Rabbi and cantor Steven Blane is a pop-jazz-Americana singer-poet in the style of Leonard […]]]>

Light-hearted and relatable, the lyrics advise that “happiness can be found cheap, but it can be quite expensive to keep.” This thread of humor runs throughout the album and all of Blane’s work.

Rabbi and cantor Steven Blane is a pop-jazz-Americana singer-poet in the style of Leonard Cohen, Jon Mitchell, Tom Waits and Roy Orbison who releases his new album, “The Met” on June 15.

It features ten newly written songs set in a retro-cool 1940s American Songbook vibe, in tune with the sophisticated, jazzy style of songwriters like Jimmy Van Heusen, Richard Rogers and Irving Berlin.

The album is sincere, but not without its cheeky moments. The closing track, “The Best Things In Life Ain’t Free,” is a play on an old adage (and a Sinatra song). Light-hearted and relatable, the lyrics advise that “happiness can be found cheap, but it can be quite expensive to keep.” This thread of humor runs throughout the album and all of Blane’s work.

Although attempting such a distinguished and complex style of songwriting can seem daunting, Blane is blessed with both a voice rich and sonorous enough for this type of material and a finely honed skill to navigate the side. compositional, with a natural flair for melody.

The quality of the album should come as no surprise to those familiar with New York-based creative Blane.

He is also a rabbi and cantor, and as such sings and writes from a place of intimate familiarity with the human condition. As rabbi of the Sim Shalom Universalist Jewish Synagogue, he conducts regular services and major feasts in which the universal language of music plays a prominent role. Listeners from all walks of life would do well to peruse his playlists of Jewish liturgical music.

Blane is no stranger to the New York concert scene (for a taste of his gigs, check out his video collection). Steve Blane’s work is truly in a class of its own.

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Great 1970s Japanese Jazz Mixtapes: 4 Hours of Funky, Groovy, and Fusion-Y Music https://iridiumjazz.com/great-1970s-japanese-jazz-mixtapes-4-hours-of-funky-groovy-and-fusion-y-music/ Fri, 27 May 2022 11:12:35 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/great-1970s-japanese-jazz-mixtapes-4-hours-of-funky-groovy-and-fusion-y-music/ Like American jazz, Japanese jazz began with earlier styles like foxtrot and ragtime. Jazz was international music, spreading across the Atlantic to London, Paris and Berlin and across the Pacific to Shanghai, Manila and Tokyo. Luxury liners crossed the ocean and their house orchestras carried with them new styles of dance music. “There was very […]]]>

Like American jazz, Japanese jazz began with earlier styles like foxtrot and ragtime. Jazz was international music, spreading across the Atlantic to London, Paris and Berlin and across the Pacific to Shanghai, Manila and Tokyo. Luxury liners crossed the ocean and their house orchestras carried with them new styles of dance music. “There was very little improvisation,” in early Japanese jazz, “but it wasn’t as prominent, as you know, in American jazz of the 1910s or 20s,” said historian E. Taylor Atkins at NPR.

Japan even had its own jazz era. The word first entered the country in a “popular 1929 song attached to a film called March from Tokyo“says Atkins. “The lyrics refer to jazz, and… that’s kind of where it entered the mass consciousness. It was associated with dance halls, it was associated with “modern girls” and “modern boys” – the Japanese version of flappers and dandies – and with urban recreation classes: excess, and dogs and cats sleeping together, and all these kinds of omens. of a future disaster.

When calamity struck in the form of World War II, jazz was banned in Japan as enemy music. On August 15, 1954, when the Emperor went on the radio to announce Japan’s surrender, Hattori Ryoichi, “Japan’s premier jazz composer and arranger”, found himself stuck in Shanghai, “the city which since the end of the 1920s, was the mecca of jazz. of Asia,” writes Michael Bourdaghs in a history of Japanese pop music. “From now on,” Ryoichi reportedly toasts his fellow musicians upon hearing the news, “we can conduct our musical activities freely.”

How Ryoichi could have predicted the kind of musical freedom that Japanese jazz would find. But first there was a period of imitation. “In the early post-war years, Japanese musicians basically copied the Americans they admired,” notes Dean Van Nguyen at The Guardian. Some of the most popular bands on TV and in movies were comedy groups like Frankie Sakai and the City Slickers, a big band formed in 1953 in imitation of Spike Jones & The City Slickers. Another popular jazz comedy number, Hajime Hana & The Crazy Cats “is important”, writes Atkins, “in capitalizing on and conveying an image of jazz musicians as clownish, slang-singing scoundrels”.

Pianist Toshiko Akiyoshi was “the first Japanese artist to break away from simply copying American artists and develop a distinctive sound and identity that incorporated Japanese harmonies and instruments”, writes Van Nguyen. In the late 1960s and 1970s, economic development led to a “renaissance” of Japanese jazz, writes the Sabukaru Guide to 1970’s Japanese Jazz. “The unique creative landscape of the jazz community, along with Japanese music as a whole simultaneously becoming more experimental and more traditional, led to an abundance of excellent Japanese jazz music in the 1970s.”

In the four playlists here, you can hear hours of this groundbreaking music from some of the biggest names you’ve probably never heard in Japanese jazz. Among them is trombonist Hiroshi Suzuki, “one of Japan’s most revered jazz artists,” notes the Pink Wafer Club blog, “even though most listeners know of his work only from the number of times his music has been sampled”. Suzuki’s 1975 album Cat is one of the funkiest jazz albums from any country released during the decade.

These playlists also include fusion keyboardist Mikio Masuda, saxophonist Sadao Watanabe and other musicians who, like Akiyoshi, helped “steer young artists away from Blue Note mimicry towards free jazz, fusion funk , the spiritual, the modal and the bebop,” writes Van Nguyen. . “These daring virtuosos implanted rock and electronic elements, or took influences from afrobeat and flamenco music.” Their international influences mirror 1970s jazz experiences around the world. Music also benefited from the excellent recording quality of Japanese studios and the rise of smaller labels, which allowed more experimental artists to record and release albums.

Find out above why “many young Japanese musicians cite the jazz innovators of this era as influences,” writes Sabukaru. Read about ten of the best Japanese jazz records from the 1970s here. Check out a massive guide to Japanese jazz from all eras at Rate Your Music, and find track listings with timestamps for each of the playlists above on their YouTube page.

Related Content:

A 30-minute introduction to 1970s Japanese jazz: like Japanese whisky, it’s underrated, but very high quality

Japanese Jazz Sound Explorations: Stream 8 Mixes from the Japanese Jazz Tradition Online for Free

Famous Japanese jazz pianist Yōsuke Yamashita plays a hot piano on the beach

Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him on @jdmagness

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LeAndra and Sharon at the North Shore Jazz Up Festival https://iridiumjazz.com/leandra-and-sharon-at-the-north-shore-jazz-up-festival/ Fri, 27 May 2022 05:09:37 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/leandra-and-sharon-at-the-north-shore-jazz-up-festival/ Features News day reporter Friday, May 27, 2022 International jazz, soul, funk and techno artist Sharon Phillips stunned audiences when she performed at North Coast Jazz in 2019. When the North Coast Jazz and Heritage Festival hosts its major event tomorrow, mighty soprano LeAndra Head will be among the performers providing high-level entertainment at Solomon […]]]>

Features



International jazz, soul, funk and techno artist Sharon Phillips stunned audiences when she performed at North Coast Jazz in 2019.

When the North Coast Jazz and Heritage Festival hosts its major event tomorrow, mighty soprano LeAndra Head will be among the performers providing high-level entertainment at Solomon Hochoy Ground, Laundress.

Festival artists also include Dean Williams and the band Adan Hagley with Tony Paul, Sharon Phillips, Reuel Lynch, Freetown Collective, Michelle Sylvester, Johan Chuckaree and Mista Vibe. This festival from May 27 to 29 is dedicated to the calypsonian Lord Nelson.

After a two-year wait, LeAndra is looking forward to performing at the NCJ.

“I’m excited. I was invited to perform at the show in 2020 but unfortunately with the onset of covid the event was canceled so I’m really grateful to be invited to perform again this year I’m also starting to work with an amazing group of musicians and can’t wait to get on stage with them,” LeAndra told Newsday.

She says that while audiences can expect to hear music they know, choosing their repertoire was no small feat.

“It was a little difficult trying to choose a set because I hadn’t had to in a while. (But) They can expect a set that includes music that is beloved and appreciated by a lot.”

Like many other artists, she has had to find ways to stay active during the past two years of the pandemic.

“I started teaching voice. It was one of the things that kept me busy, it gave meaning to the times when I couldn’t play and it also introduced a new way to use the skills that I have developed over the years. It is very rewarding to be able to help my students grow and develop their natural talents.”

As the entertainment industry opened up, she was able to do a few live performances.

“I recently performed in the Reflections concert by John Thomas. The performance went really well so I was really happy to be on the Queen’s Hall stage again. It was my first time going up been on stage for a long time, so I was really grateful to have the opportunity to be there and to be able to play with John and a full orchestra was a great experience.”

She was back at Queen’s Hall, St Ann’s, last weekend for a performance of Stefan Roach’s The Art of Guitar: Return Of The Strings.

From her earliest years, LeAndra’s winning voice placed her at the top of competitions. His sophisticated vocal abilities earned him Best Soloist honors at the SanFest Music Festival for three consecutive years.

She won the St James We Beat festival amateur night contest in 2004, beating several adult contestants. Also at the San Fernando Jazz Festival that year, she shared the stage with world-renowned South African artist Hugh Masekela and dazzled the crowd with her version of Etta James’ signature hit, At Last. She performed in Manhattan and in 2013 took part in the opera Porgy and Bess in Budapest, Hungary, where she was the youngest cast member.

She and her sister, Tylah, performed at the National Music Festival in 2017 and won the Anne Fridal Cup for Operatic Duet, and she also won Best Folk Choral Performance with the University of Trinidad and Tobago Choir. -Tobago (UTT), where she sang the solo. . She graduated from college that year with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Music majoring in voice.

In the ever-changing circumstances of today’s entertainment industry, what are her future career plans?

LeAndra on stage during the Reflections Live production of John Thomas at Queen’s Hall, St Ann’s in April. LeAndra will perform at the North Coast Jazz and Heritage Festival, Solomon Hochoy Ground, Laundress on May 28. Photo by Andrea De Silva

“With covid still lurking, things are still very uncertain in the performance world. I keep hearing stories of shows being canceled because a lot of the cast have had covid. I just hope that I will be able to continue to have opportunities to play. I would also like to start recording my own music. I have spent so much time in studios working on other people’s music, I feel like it’s time for me to start working on my own.

Another powerful performer at the festival, well known in Europe and the Middle East, is international jazz, soul, funk and techno artist, Sharon Phillips, also known as Anubia Phoenix Nile. Phillips has stunned local audiences in recent years with her performances and rocked the crowd at North Coast Jazz in 2019 with her vocals.

Phillips left Trinidad and Tobago to pursue music internationally at the age of 19, having signed to Brickhouse Records (Germany) and EMI Records (London).

Her songs, Touch Me and Like This Like That, which she composed, went to number one in Spain and number one in most underground dance charts (a fusion of European culture and the ragga soca element).

She has worked with Peppermint Records in Hannover, Germany, and Universal (Berlin, Germany) and participated in James Bond tours as a Bond girl singer with several orchestras in Germany.

Phillips has also made calypso and soca recordings. She is expected to deliver another scintillating performance at the festival.

The festival which begins tonight is themed Family and will feature Machel Montano’s Bazodee for its Friday Night feature which is free to the public.

On Saturdays, some of TT’s leading jazz exponents will entertain patrons from 3pm to 10pm.

For the first time, Blue Sunday is presented with a J’Ouvert from 2am to 7am which will feature DJs and HADCO Phase II.

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NYO Jazz Announces First US Tour This Summer https://iridiumjazz.com/nyo-jazz-announces-first-us-tour-this-summer/ Tue, 24 May 2022 19:00:39 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/nyo-jazz-announces-first-us-tour-this-summer/ Carnegie Hall today announced the schedule for its acclaimed ensemble NYO Jazz’s first-ever U.S. tour, which will take place on the heels of the June 24, 2022 release of the ensemble’s first full-length studio album, We’re Still Here. The album features NYO Jazz artistic director and bandleader/trumpeter Sean Jones and special guest Melissa Aldana on […]]]>

Carnegie Hall today announced the schedule for its acclaimed ensemble NYO Jazz’s first-ever U.S. tour, which will take place on the heels of the June 24, 2022 release of the ensemble’s first full-length studio album, We’re Still Here. The album features NYO Jazz artistic director and bandleader/trumpeter Sean Jones and special guest Melissa Aldana on tenor saxophone, as well as a guest appearance from trombonist Wycliffe Gordon. Available for pre-order, the album will be published by Platoon and will be available for digital download and on all streaming platforms in standard and Dolby Atmos Spatial Audio formats.

Following NYO Jazz’s US tour kick-off concert at Carnegie Hall on Thursday, July 28, the ensemble, joined by special guest singer this summer Jazzmeia Horn, will tour seven US cities under the direction of Sean Jones. Tour stops include: Cleveland, OH July 30 (Tri-C Metro Auditorium); Chautauqua, NY on August 1 (Chautauqua Amphitheater); Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, August 2 (The August Wilson African American Cultural Center); Chicago, IL August 4 (Navy Pier, Lake Stage at Polk Bros Park); Detroit, MI on August 5 (The Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center); Madison, WI on August 7 (Wisconsin Union Theater); and Washington, DC on August 9 (The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts).

“I’m so excited to perform with the incredible young musicians at NYO Jazz at Carnegie Hall this summer,” said Jazzmeia Horn. “What a wonderful opportunity as this tour marks my first time playing an entire big band tour and I’m especially excited to sing selections from my new big band album, Dear Love. I’m curious to see how NYO Jazz will perform my final expression of love musically as we connect with audiences in cities across the United States. It will be a fun journey to share with them!”

One of Carnegie Hall’s three acclaimed national youth ensembles, NYO Jazz, comprised of exceptional young musicians ages 16-19 from across the United States, showcases the legacy and bright future of American jazz. Established in 2018 by Hall’s Weill Music Institute, NYO Jazz brings together some of the country’s top teen jazz musicians each year to train, perform and tour with world-class jazz masters while serving as music ambassadors for their country. . NYO Jazz’s successful international tours include an inaugural European tour in 2018 with Dianne Reeves as special guest, and the ensemble’s first Asia tour in 2019 with Kurt Elling as special guest. Although NYO Jazz has been unable to travel for the past two years, the musicians reunited virtually during the summer of 2020 and at Purchase College, State University of New York (SUNY) just north of New York, in the summer of 2021, rehearsing and recording a wide range of repertoire, including her debut album.

We’re Still Here features four new works written for the band since its inception, a range of classic and contemporary tableaux that characterize their live concerts, and works exploring themes such as social justice, resilience and the power of music to trigger joy. The four works commissioned by Carnegie Hall on the album are: “Run with Jones” by Miguel Zenón, with Melissa Aldana as soloist; “Mr. Jones and Co.” by Ayn Inserto, with Sean Jones as soloist; “Party in the Head” by John Beasley; and “RPM’s” by Igmar Thomas. In addition to these commissions, some of the album’s highlights included: “We’re Still Here” by trombonist and NYO Jazz faculty member Wycliffe Gordon, which became the band’s catchy encore theme song; hence the title of the album; “The Art of War” by Ralph Peterson; “Oyelo” by Miguel Zenón, with Melissa Aldana as soloist; “A Taste of Honey” by Duke Pearson; “Mr. Gentle and Mr. Cool” by Duke Ellington, arranged by NYO Jazz Ensemble coach Reginald Thomas; and “Transitions” by Sean Jones.

“You close your eyes and think they’re all 20 years older than them,” said Sean Jones, who pays for it with his passionate leadership of NYO Jazz, carrying on the tradition of mentorship in jazz.

The album, recorded during the summer 2021 training residency at Purchase College, SUNY, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, is a statement of resilience and longevity. A summer that began with the disappointment of a year without touring turned into an opportunity to create this 97-minute showcase of the incredible artistry and enormous versatility of this remarkable ensemble, a recording about to be released. reach audiences around the world just as the ensemble resumes touring in the summer of 2022.

“We are thrilled to have NYO Jazz releasing its debut album this spring, the first recording from one of our national youth ensembles,” said Sarah Johnson, director of education and director of the Weill Music Institute at Carnegie Hall. “This is a tremendous opportunity for these talented young musicians to train, perform and now record alongside some of today’s greatest jazz artists, including special guest Melissa Aldana. was particularly important for the musicians to come together for an extended residency last summer, as it marked the first time many of them had the opportunity to come together to play in a full ensemble since the start of the pandemic. With We’re Still Here, we’re proud to showcase the incredible depth of talent and high level of musicianship of these peerless jazz musicians from across the country who will help ensure the preservation of one of America’s quintessential art forms for generations to come.”

“The big band has always been America’s orchestral format and one of the most diverse ensembles ever devised,” said Sean Jones, artistic director and bandleader of NYO Jazz. “He can convey almost any style of music in a sonically challenging and interactive way. This recording shows that diversity by placing classics from Duke Ellington and Neil Hefti alongside pieces that use the big band as a vehicle for contemporary American music and represent a wide variety of genres.”

“Making this album has been an absolute labor of love for the musicians, our amazing teachers and guest artists, and everyone involved,” said Joanna Massey, Director of Learning and Engagement Programs at Weill Music Institute at Carnegie Hall, who has worked with the NYO Jazz program since its inception. “From their individual preparation before coming together as an ensemble, through long days of rehearsals and then recording sessions, the musicians have been unwavering and inspiring in their dedication to producing something meaningful for the world at It’s especially special that by recording all of the original music written especially for NYO Jazz, the album also pays tribute to the outstanding musicians of previous NYO Jazz ensembles – who, like the musicians heard here, embody the future of jazz. .

About NYO Jazz

Each summer, NYO Jazz, led by Artistic Director Sean Jones, highlights the depth of talent found among young jazz musicians across the United States. The program offers talented young musicians, ages 16 to 19, the opportunity to perform as cultural ambassadors of their country, sharing a unique American musical genre with people around the world through an international tour. Members of NYO Jazz have been recognized by Carnegie Hall as some of the nation’s finest jazz musicians, following a rigorous and highly competitive audition process. Following its Carnegie Hall debut in 2018, the ensemble embarked on its first-ever international tour for performances with singer Dianne Reeves at prestigious concert halls and music festivals in London, Amsterdam, Edinburgh, Kassel and Berlin. In the summer of 2019, NYO Jazz went on their first Asia tour, joined by vocalist Kurt Elling, including performances in Taichung, Beijing, Shanghai, Zhuhai and Hong Kong. As part of their travel program, NYO Jazz musicians also have the opportunity to meet and collaborate with young local musicians and experience the richness of different cultures and music.

NYO Jazz builds on the success of the famous National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America (NYO-USA) and its sister ensemble for young musicians NYO2-programs created by Carnegie Hall in 2013 and 2016, respectively-to bring together the best young classical musicians from across the country each summer for training, performance and international touring. Each of these prestigious national programs, free to all participants, is dedicated to the proposition that talented young musicians thrive when they have the opportunity to expand their musical, social and cultural horizons and share their artistic talent with audiences around the world. Since 2013, Carnegie Hall’s national youth ensembles have performed in 15 countries on four continents, including touring China, South Korea, Mexico, Ecuador, Colombia, Russia and throughout Europe.

We are always here
Sean Jones, artistic director, conductor and trumpet
Special guest Melissa Aldana, tenor saxophone
With Wycliffe Gordon, trombone

1. A Taste of Honey from Duke Pearson*
2. Pleasantly plump by Quincy Jones*
3. Oyelo by Miguel Zenon
4. Mr. Jones and Co. by Ayn Inserto (2019 NYO Jazz commission)
5. We’re Still Here by Wycliffe Gordon
6. Duke Pearson’s Bedouin
7. Party Inside John Beasley’s Head (2020 NYO Jazz commission)
8. Mr. Gentle and Mr. Cool by Duke Ellington and Laura Rembert, arr. Reginald Thomas
9. RPM by Igmar Thomas (2021 NYO Jazz commission)
10. Run with Jones by Miguel Zenón (2018 NYO Jazz Commission)
11. Cute by Neil Hefti
12. I Be Serious About Dem Blues by John Clayton*
13. The Art of War by Ralph Peterson
14. Transitions by Sean Jones

* Only for the digital version

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Petter Eldh wins SWR Jazz Prize 2022 – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/petter-eldh-wins-swr-jazz-prize-2022-london-jazz-news/ Fri, 13 May 2022 10:01:30 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/petter-eldh-wins-swr-jazz-prize-2022-london-jazz-news/ Double bass player, conductor and composer Petter Eldh, originally from Gothenburg in Sweden and living in Berlin since 2009, will receive Germany’s oldest jazz prize, the SWR Jazz Prize, originally initiated by Joachim-Ernst Berendt. The award ceremony will take place on October 10 in Ludwigshafen during the Enjoy Jazz Festival. The awards night concert will […]]]>

Double bass player, conductor and composer Petter Eldh, originally from Gothenburg in Sweden and living in Berlin since 2009, will receive Germany’s oldest jazz prize, the SWR Jazz Prize, originally initiated by Joachim-Ernst Berendt. The award ceremony will take place on October 10 in Ludwigshafen during the Enjoy Jazz Festival. The awards night concert will see him perform with the ENEMY trio along with Kit Downes and James Maddren.

Petter Eldh (centre) with Kit Downes and James Maddren. Masterclass at the Royal Academy of Music, 2020.
Photo by Nick Smart

TEXT OF THE PRESS RELEASE

” Baden-Baden/Mainz. The SWR Jazz Prize 2022, awarded jointly by the state of Rhineland-Palatinate and the Südwestrundfunk, will be awarded to the Swedish double bass player, conductor and composer based in Berlin Petter Eldh. The prize will be awarded on October 10 at the international “Enjoy Jazz” festival in Ludwigshafen.

In the declaration of the jury (laudatio), it is written:With Petter Eldh, a musician wins the SWR Jazz Prize which has a formative influence on the international network improvisation scene. His energetic and empathetic double bass playing in ensembles such as Punkt Vrt. Plastik, the Django Bates Beloved Trio or the Kit Downes Trio is quite exceptional. Likewise, Petter Eldh left his trailblazing mark as a bandleader, composer, producer and arranger with his Koma Saxo Quintet and Drums Project.

Germany‘s oldest jazz prize, awarded for the 42nd time
The SWR Jazz Prize, initiated by Joachim-Ernst Berendt, is the oldest jazz prize in Germany and will be awarded for the 42nd time in 2022 by the Land of Rhineland-Palatinate and Südwestrundfunk. The jury is composed of two representatives of SWR (Günther Huesmann, president, and Julia Neupert) and of the state of Rhineland-Palatinate (Georg-Rudolf May, Claudia Hartmann), member of a jazz organization (Christina Fuchs, German Jazz Union) and two independent music critics (Bert Noglik, Michael Rüsenberg). The prize is endowed with 15,000 euros.

Award ceremony at the “Enjoy Jazz” festival
The award ceremony and the concert with the winner and his trio Enemy will take place as part of the “Enjoy Jazz” festival on October 10, 2022, from 8 p.m. at the Kulturzentrum das Haus in Ludwigshafen. Enemy is made up of Petter Eldh (double bass), Kit Downes (piano) and James Maddren (drums). (Quote from press release ends)

LINKS: Petter Eldh’s website

Jazz at SWR2

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