Germany – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 08:40:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Germany – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 Review of the EFG London Jazz Festival https://iridiumjazz.com/review-of-the-efg-london-jazz-festival/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 08:40:03 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/review-of-the-efg-london-jazz-festival/ Yes, improvisation is by nature the most unpredictable of professions. Charles Mingus said “trying to play the truth about who I am” was difficult because he was changing all the time. Pianist Keith Jarrett complained about the pressure of being both a ventriloquist and a model. There were no such barriers here. Stan Sulzmann’s quartet […]]]>

Yes, improvisation is by nature the most unpredictable of professions. Charles Mingus said “trying to play the truth about who I am” was difficult because he was changing all the time. Pianist Keith Jarrett complained about the pressure of being both a ventriloquist and a model.

There were no such barriers here. Stan Sulzmann’s quartet played at an outlying festival venue, the Assembly House, overlooking the main railway tracks in Kentish Town. He played two absolutely unforgettable sets and gave a very true account of who he was and who he is. Sulzmann will turn 74 in a few days and was born in the nearby town of Islington. After the saxophonist played the first piece, “Conception” by George Shearing, he thought that not only was his father an accordionist, but that two very great jazz pianists from south London had also played the accordion at adolescence: Shearing himself, and also Stan Tracey. Sulzmann also seemed to tell us his life story through his playing. We heard tracks from two of the greats he was very close to, Kenny Wheeler (“Old Times”) and John Taylor (“Ambleside”). And when he played Johnny Green’s “Body and Soul,” it was the polar opposite of Coleman Hawkins’ carved granite. Stan’s voice is pure lyricism, arabesque, with another teasing counter-melody lurking in the wings ready to make its entrance.

Can you judge the probable musical quality of a concert by the number of cases of instruments in the hall? Maybe. This marvelous concert had attracted an audience of young saxophonists. As always, they were able to admire the total balance of Sulzmann’s sonic production on the instrument. His tone is never forced; nothing stands in the way of music. His quartet consisted of one of London’s most fluent young improvising pianists, Will Barry, reduced to playing a portable electric piano, but still communicating joy. Loyal bassist Steve Watts still plays unerringly, courteously and with endless subtlety and imagination, and we were also introduced to Kai MacRae, a young drummer with a fine touch and a super sense of texture and time.

It was one of the most intimate concerts of the festival, but really great. Hopefully the 2023 Festival will bring Stan Sulzmann to a more central location to celebrate his 75th birthday. He deserves it. He is an absolutely inescapable figure in British jazz, and there will be no shortage of musicians from several younger generations who will want to line up to show their respect, gratitude and admiration.

The gigs I mention here are a very personal selection, and mostly taken from the regular London club schedule. I did this partly because the chances of hearing something special – like the Sulzmann concert – are higher, but also for the practical reason that the writing team at London Jazz News, which I edit, has produced over 20 reviews (see link below). We provide the most comprehensive coverage of the festival by a country mile. We’ve covered many of the biggest gigs, including the Festival’s biggest gig, primarily a series of DJ sets at Printworks London that sold 6,000 tickets. I confess, I shamelessly followed my enthusiasms.One of the highlights was the realization of a very audacious idea by courageous Milan-born, London-based singer Francesca Confortini (pictured above by Jonathan Cuff). Confortini has assembled her own songbook, songs by what she calls “contemporary female millennial composers.” Confortini shows well-placed belief in Esperanza Spalding’s songs (“I Know You Know”) from the bassist’s breakthrough 2008 album Hope, or 2019’s Jazzmeia Horn’s “Free Your Mind,” and she brings such energy, vibrancy, and musicality to the task of conducting that it all works. Getting the rights sorted will probably be tricky, but this deserves to be an album.

I also heard two other singers. I headed to the 606 Club to witness the phenomenal talent of singer Anita Wardell. She’s been missing from London for the past four years while working as a teacher in Adelaide, but now she’s given it up and is back here. Betty Carter’s celebration of Wardell was a joy, and she has the skills and the jazz chops to do it. The room was filled with other singers, all apparently impressed. And to anyone who comes out with the lazy trope that they don’t like scat singing, there’s a simple answer: if there’s one current singer who can change her mind, it’s Anita Wardell.

Catherine Russell performed the last two of the 50 concerts that Pizza Express Live has held at their three venues. Russell is jazz royalty and carries a deep sense of the tradition of his father, Panama-born Luis Russell, who was Louis Armstrong’s bandleader. His connection to the music of the 1920s and 1930s is profound. His days as a backing vocalist for Donald Fagen/Steely Dan and for David Bowie were replaced by a deep exploration of early jazz. A solid group too.EFG London Jazz FestivalHarpist Edmar Castaneda, who gave a duo concert at Wigmore Hall with the Geneva harmonica genius Grégoire Maret (pictured above by Ralf Dombrowski), once had another duet with pianist Hiromi. They used to give the kind of gig where so many notes were played that – as the late great Eddie Harvey would say – they would need someone to sweep them away afterwards. His duet with Maret is very different from the previous one. Yes, Maret is a virtuoso, but he also has a way of shaping the melody of a track like Charlie Haden’s “Our Spanish Love Song” that could melt any heart. It definitely affects mine. These days, Castaneda performs facing the audience rather than sideways, and the flicker of emotions on his face as he performs is totally compelling. The Maret/Castaneda duo has a fascinating history. Since there was no published schedule, it was a shame that the concert announcer didn’t bother to do any homework other than learning how to pronounce the names correctly.EFG London Jazz Festival Announcements and context were once again lacking at the Chucho Valdes concert (pictured above by John Watson) during the closing night of the festival (a trend here?). The band assembled to play Valdes’ new work “Creacion” is packed with stars such as percussionist Roberto Vizcaino Jr and drummer Dafnis Prieto, and Valdes’ medley flowing and dreamy through around two dozen jazz standards was mesmerizing. We just needed more information…

The Vortex and Hans Koller, head of jazz at Trinity Laban, had put together a wonderful project. They had taken the initiative to invite the great Mike Gibbs and play four different programs from his extensive catalog for jazz orchestra on the occasion of his 85th birthday. While in sport the idea of ​​bringing in “ringers” to strengthen the team is prohibited, here the combination of experienced professionals – Tom Challenger, Julian Siegel, Tom Walsh, Gene Calderazzo, Lewis Wright and Koller himself – worked brilliantly. These musicians turned a student jazz band into a band that could do justice to Gibbs’ chemistry and variety as an arranger. Is there anyone who can write as well in as many idioms as Mike Gibbs? Josephine Davies directed and brought it all together brilliantly.

Manchester-born pianist Julie Sassoon had traveled from Berlin and gave a rare solo show in London on a very fine piano at Theatro Technis on Crowndale Road in Camden. She plays intensely with long arcs and structures, and the audience was slow to settle in.

There are some interesting new developments. Jazz festivals inevitably diversify to attract more young people. So this year the highest number of tickets sold (6,000) for a single event was on the final Saturday at Printworks London, a program dominated by DJ sets rather than live music. The economically inconvenient truth must, somehow, come out: for live music, and for improvised music in particular – surely – small isn’t just beautiful, it’s essential.

@sebscotney

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ChicagoXLondon at the Barbican (2022 EFG LJF) – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/chicagoxlondon-at-the-barbican-2022-efg-ljf-london-jazz-news/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 13:58:47 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/chicagoxlondon-at-the-barbican-2022-efg-ljf-london-jazz-news/ Chicago X London — Jeff Parker, Ben LaMar Gay, Angel Bat Dawid, Alabaster DePlume (Barbican. November 13, 2022. Live review by AJ Dehany) Cassie Kinoshi, Theon Cross, Asher Simiso Gamedze, Angel Bat Dawid… and the audience. Photo credit: Ash Knotek/Serious You could call 2022 the “Chicago edition” of the London Jazz Festival, a celebration of […]]]>

Chicago X London — Jeff Parker, Ben LaMar Gay, Angel Bat Dawid, Alabaster DePlume

(Barbican. November 13, 2022. Live review by AJ Dehany)

Cassie Kinoshi, Theon Cross, Asher Simiso Gamedze, Angel Bat Dawid… and the audience. Photo credit: Ash Knotek/Serious

You could call 2022 the “Chicago edition” of the London Jazz Festival, a celebration of the creative relationship between Chicago and London, a longstanding exchange that has enriched each side. The flagship concerts of Anthony Braxton, Henry Threadgill, Matana Roberts, Makaya McCraven are an essential program.

The Barbican’s Chicago X London gig was a substantial check-in to check out with sets from Chicagoans Jeff Parker, Ben Lamar Gay and Angel Bat Dawidwhose group included the British Cassie Kinoshi and Theon Cross, and a set by British saxophonist and poet Alabaster DePlumewhose album Gold sparkles among the flagships of the International Anthem label, which houses Makaya McCraven, Emma-Jean Thackray, Ben Lamar Gay, Irreversible Entanglementsand the late trumpeter Branch of Jaime.

From Alabaster Feather. Photo credit: Ash Knotek/Serious

Between sets, the concert projected footage from Jaimie Branch’s 2017 visit to the Total Refreshment Center in Dalston, a venue and record label that has played a pivotal role in fostering Chicago-London dialogue and leading the new British jazz sound. His death this year was a shock and the wound is still very fresh. Alabaster DePlume talked about working with Jaimie Branch and asked if we’d like to hear anything we haven’t heard. It sounded a bit like marching band music to me, but you have to assume there’s untold riches to be hoped for somewhere. The strongest element of the 32-minute set was the group harmonies, which were beautiful but also uncannily reminiscent of the Manson family. Alabaster DePlume himself bothers; he proclaims unifying, universalizing feelings to go forward in the courage of our love, but his manner is acerbic and aggressive. That doesn’t suit me, even though I think music is a great synthesis of influences and energies.

gay ben lamar possesses an easier charm, and his album Open your arms to open us is an equally eclectic elaboration of disparate energies, a vision of musical ‘Pan-Americana’. His set at Berlin Jazzfest the week before really made me sit up and listen. He lamented that every time he’s invited to London it’s for short sets, but there’s a lot in this set, from the skronky front blowing to the rhythmic vocals and a punchy yet tender and atmospheric feel with Edhino Gerber on guitar. , Matthew Davis on sousaphone, and Tommaso Moretti on drums. Hopefully the next time he’s invited to London it’ll be for a longer set! He paid tribute to the people of the Chicago and London communities, simply stating “all we have to do is share and grow”.

Jeff Parker was highly anticipated, but his solo guitar playing might have felt too intimate and personal for the large space of the Barbican Hall – see for contrast this review from Montreal This Summer (LINK). It was an individual expression, but it went against the grain of an evening celebrating community dialogues.

Angel Bat Dawid. Photo credit: Ash Knotek/Serious

One of the most authentic expressions of the Chicago X London design has been the fusion of the Chicago Soothsayer Bat angel Dawidwith Cassie Kinoshi on sax, Theon Cross on tuba and Asher Simiso Gamedze on percussion. Her solo sets can turn into something akin to group music therapy sessions, and even here she joked, “I’m here to hypnotize you. I’m here to change your mind, to brainwash you! and urging us to “Learn the real story. It’s sad to have to say that. An Angel Bat Dawid concert is never normal, and this one was a riot, with everyone on their feet and screaming. “What is happening here?” she asked. “We have entered a portal to another world!” It’s a familiar world of Archie Shepp’s intellectual-spiritual art music, but as it moves quickly from reed to reed, there’s also some new vocoder stuff that felt more compelling here. made with the young players, and a weird f’kd-up Für Elise that certainly made it sound otherworldly.

It was Angel Bat Dawid, with Ben Lamar Gay, who went the furthest to interest the coda of the evening’s events, a well-meaning but listless assembly of all the players from the previous four sets, for a meandering enigma through Jaimie Branch’s Love song for assholes. It was one moment in a long evening of moments that we loved and hated in equal measure, but an evening that, for the most part, vividly showcased the enduring energy and vitality of the Chicago-London dialogue.

AJ Dehany writes independently about music, art and more. ajdehany.co.uk

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16-year-old jazz prodigy Brandon Goldberg has previously performed at the Newport Jazz Festival and Carnegie Hall. Now he’s coming to the Berkshires | Berkshire landscapes https://iridiumjazz.com/16-year-old-jazz-prodigy-brandon-goldberg-has-previously-performed-at-the-newport-jazz-festival-and-carnegie-hall-now-hes-coming-to-the-berkshires-berkshire-landscapes/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/16-year-old-jazz-prodigy-brandon-goldberg-has-previously-performed-at-the-newport-jazz-festival-and-carnegie-hall-now-hes-coming-to-the-berkshires-berkshire-landscapes/ LENOX – For many teenagers, the biggest event of the year they turn 13 is their Bar Mitzvah. For pianist Brandon Goldberg, however, performing at the legendary Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island in 2019 as the youngest performer that summer was an unforgettable thrill. If you are going to BRANDON GOLDBERG THREESOME Who: Brandon […]]]>

LENOX – For many teenagers, the biggest event of the year they turn 13 is their Bar Mitzvah. For pianist Brandon Goldberg, however, performing at the legendary Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island in 2019 as the youngest performer that summer was an unforgettable thrill.

“They treated me like a real musician,” Goldberg, now 16, said in a phone interview from his home in Miami, Florida. “I have to be behind the scenes with Christian McBride and Herbie Hancock, around all my heroes.”

On Sunday, November 20, Goldberg will make his musical debut in the Berkshires, where he has visited his grandparents’ summer home since he was little. He will perform on a vintage Steinway piano in the historic Ventfort Hall Mansion and Gilded Age Museum accompanied by bassist Ben Wolfe and drummer Aaron Kimmel. The Brandon Goldberg Trio’s Berkshires Debut is a signature event at Berkshires Jazz’s three-day Fall Jazz Sprawl in Lenox and Pittsfield.

The young jazz phenomenon started playing the piano at the age of 3.

“I came home from kindergarten one day and played some songs they taught us,” Goldberg said. “I got into jazz because my grandparents showed me a Rat Pack video. I became obsessed with Frank Sinatra, he’s still my hero. I also found Tony Bennett, especially with pianist Bill Evans When I heard Bill play, I thought, this is what I want to do.

His parents – who are also not musicians – were looking for programs that would accept such a youngster playing at a higher level. They found what they were looking for at the University of Miami summer camps.

“I’ve had the opportunity to work with some real giants of the jazz world, like the late Chicago great Ira Sullivan who played with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. He helped a young Herbie Hancock, he was one of the few who took a 6-year-old seriously,” Goldberg said.

At age 8, Goldberg won a competition to perform at Carnegie Hall and appeared twice on NBC’s “Little Big Shots” television series, which he promoted on Harry Connick Jr.’s TV show.

“He’s an incredible musician,” Goldberg recalls, “he does all his own arrangements and has a real vision of what he wants. He’s a perfectionist. Playing the piano with him was something I treasured.

Goldberg recorded his debut album “Let’s Play!” at age 11, followed by “In Good Time” a few years later. Both were recognized by Downbeat Magazine as among the best albums of the year.

At Ventfort Hall, the trio will perform “music by Henry Mancini and the Great American Songbook [selections] that not everyone plays, beautiful, unique songs that have been lost in the shadows, by composers like Jerome Kern, George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Cole Porter,” Goldberg said. Many songs were recorded by Sinatra, he explained.

The poster includes Goldberg’s own compositions.

“I’ve always heard melodies in my head, as far back as I can remember. I try to be as original as possible, true to my individual voice,” he said.

In addition to writing for the trio, quartet and quintet with which he plays, Goldberg has composed two orchestral works for piano, commissioned, performed and recorded by the Miami Symphony Orchestra.

Brandon Goldberg – Piano

Mark Lewandowski – Bass

Jimmy MacBride – Drums

Recorded and streamed live from Telefunken Studios, South Windsor, CT

(yes, a little video editing was done due to technical issues)


“I love watching how great composers have written and what they were thinking, how it influenced other music and later composers,” he said. “When I was writing my symphony, I looked at Stravinsky’s ‘The Rite of Spring’ and ‘The Firebird’ to see how he phrased certain instruments, which combinations worked best.”

He also studied Gershwin – “he was a jazz pianist” – and Bach.

“I play a lot of Bach to understand his harmony and his genius. Bach is truly perfect music, disconcerting and clear at the same time. There is an inexplicable quality in it, it is religion.

Goldberg learned to accept and embrace the “Old Soul” soubriquet. It is certainly well deserved. Listen to him play with your eyes closed and it’s hard to imagine he’s not a seasoned veteran of the jazz scene.

“There’s a certain quality that older things have, we see it in furniture, in culture, in movies,” Goldberg explained. “I hear it in the music.”

Her confident, joy-filled performance at the Newport Jazz Festival can be viewed on YouTube.

“Herbie Hancock is one of my biggest inspirations,” he says from the stage, playing music by his idol and Thelonious Monk alongside his original compositions and arrangements from Duke Ellington to Paul McCartney.

Goldberg started playing with Wolfe six years ago and with Kimmel a year ago. “It’s really comfortable, like we’ve been doing this for a while,” he said. “I’ve been so lucky to play with so many amazing musicians. I consider Ben [who also teaches at Juilliard] to be a close friend and mentor. Ben is 60 and Aaron is in his 30s, so there is a big age difference between the three of us. But I hope you don’t hear it musically.

Improv guides and motivates them 100% of the time, he explained. “They’re such great listeners and know so much music, it’s really collective improvisation. It’s my solo, but their ears are wide open and hear everything I play. If I do something different, they adapt without taking anything away musically.

He quotes classical music when he improvises, he noted. If he always liked to listen to it, it took him a long time to start playing. Nowadays, “it’s one of my favorite activities, [spending] a few hours playing some Bach preludes and fugues and Chopin studies, just to make sure my technique is there.

He is working on a third album, inspired by the music of Henry Mancini. “It was the hits of the 1960s, there’s an accessible quality that people don’t realize because it has the stereotype of older music.” He hopes to do it again.

Film music is a special interest, he said. “The way Mancini wrote his films ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’ and ‘Days of Wine and Roses’, how he captures the mood and writes songs you just have to listen to. John Williams does it with effect very different, but still has singsong and recognizable melodies.

Looking ahead to college and beyond, Goldberg “wants to be in New York playing jazz music to the highest degree possible,” he claimed. “For me, jazz music is that, if I can do that well, I’ll be happy.”

He’s on the right track, having performed on the biggest stages coast to coast, including Jazz at Lincoln Center, Dizzy’s Club, Birdland Theatre, Blue Note and the Apollo.

The Ventfort Hall gig lasted three years, said Berkshires Jazz chairman Ed Bride.

“The first time we heard of Brandon was when one of our board members came home from the Newport Jazz Festival with a CD by this 13-year-old. We were amazed by it,” he said.

Berkshires Jazz presents and promotes jazz music throughout the county and, for eight seasons, has scheduled a Jazz Prodigy concert at the Berkshire Athenaeum during the annual Pittsfield City Jazz Festival, now held each April during Pittsfield Appreciation Month. jazz.

“We’re booking someone who’s not out of high school yet,” Bride noted. “We were the first paid gig for some of these artists, which is just a thrill. But we couldn’t afford to bring [Goldberg] here from Florida.

When his mother contacted Bride to introduce her talented pianist son, “I said, ‘He’s in my CD player in my car!'” the impresario said. It was then that he learned that the family had a second home in the Berkshire area.

“We were right to work on what we could do,” Bride said.

The exceptional young talent that Berkshires Jazz presents is the future of jazz, Bride explained. “We’re getting old, and just [like] classical music, we are all concerned by the aging of the public. We don’t want to be a museum piece, we want to see it flourish and grow with new ideas.

“We started featuring saxophonist Grace Kelly when she was 14,” he added. Now 30, “she came twice this year and attracted 250 people each time in two months. Who does that in jazz around here?

Brandon Goldberg’s appearance is the cornerstone of the first Berkshires Jazz Fall Sprawl, three days of mostly free concerts at various venues in Lenox and Pittsfield supported by the Mill Town Foundation. The lineup includes the 17-piece Amherst Jazz Orchestra at the Flat Burger Society in Pittsfield on Saturday, and guitarist Luke Franco and his trio on Sunday at the Gateways Inn in Lenox.

“We’ve been looking at Ventfort Hall for a while as a venue to hold a program,” Bride said. “Hopefully this will be the first of many events there.”

“I’m really excited to do this,” Goldberg said, “The Berkshires are one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever seen. This is my first time playing here and I hope it won’t be not the last.

His dream, he admitted, is to play at Tanglewood, which he has visited often over the years. “Some of the most incredible musicians of all time have been there,” he said.

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Bristol Jazz Month – November 2022 https://iridiumjazz.com/bristol-jazz-month-november-2022/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 15:36:54 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/bristol-jazz-month-november-2022/ So it’s a bit of a saxophone party across the city this month, with a host of big-name visitors and some of our best local reed talent in the spotlight while tasty African grooves roll on in November too. The sax-fest starts at the beginning of the month, starting with a Fringe in the round […]]]>

So it’s a bit of a saxophone party across the city this month, with a host of big-name visitors and some of our best local reed talent in the spotlight while tasty African grooves roll on in November too.

The sax-fest starts at the beginning of the month, starting with a Fringe in the round double bill including Greg Sterlingthe saxophone trio of Trinomika (Tuesday 1) as well as singer Victoria Klewin’s quartet collaboration with At Guy Shotton’s keyboards. It is followed by Paul Dunmalis back to Jazz Craving (Wed 2) with a fine quartet of improvisers including Liam Noblethe piano, John Edwards on bass and Mark Sander drumming. The following night (Thursday 3rd) St George’s sees the Scottish hero Tom Smith perform a solo while improvising ‘no wires‘ show exploring the acoustics of the building, then the night of the fireworks announces the great John Toussaint at the Bristol Beacon Foyer (Saturday 5). Toussaint’s 40-year career began in New York with the legendary Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers but he later called England home where he collaborated with many of the UK‘s best over the years. The Bristol gig has a quintet of stars, including the brilliant trumpeter Freddie Gavita with Shane Forbes drumming.

It’s only the first week! Then there’s the Fringe Jazz favorite Iain Ballamy with his new quartet whose pianist Rebecca Nash (Fringe Jazz, Wed 9) before Bebop Club features an impressive young Scottish star Helen Kay (Thursday 10) with his quartet Golden Sands. The Bebop also hosts the viola player Luke Annesley (Thursday 17), famous for his free play and straight ahead, while a late change of schedule sees top young talent Xhosa Cole come to the Fringe Jazz (Wed 23) in a sparkling trio with Robert Mitchellthe piano and Mark Sander to the battery. The foot fleet might be able to rush from this gig to catch some of the no stop tenor player John Pratthe powerful quartet of JP4 at the canteen. The Bebop once again welcomes the Canadian saxophonist Terry Quiney (Thursday 24), this time alongside the guitarist Neil Burns Organ Trio with the former Bristol player Martin Jenkins back on Hammond then Fringe Jazz ends month with veteran reed player Alan Barnes (Wed 30) in partnership with the pianist David Newton – an empathetic collaboration that dates back to the late 70s. Young dynamic saxophonist Alex Merrit leads Sunday 6 session at Stag and Hounds while hard bopping Martin Kern takes the reins there on the 20th.

Bass player Riaan Vosloo (photo above) is part of Luke Annesley’s quartet but above all brings his own septet The Bustle of Riaan Vosloo at Fringe Jazz (sea 16) (with another couple of great saxophonists in Sam Crockat and Nick Dover). It’s a splendid celebration of the influx of exiled South African musicians and music onto the British scene in the 1960s and 1970s, introducing British audiences to their rich rhythmic styles and passionate playing. from Bristol Keith Tippet was an avid fan and active participant at the time and his compositions will feature alongside those of Dudu Pukwana, Chris McGregor and others. It’s the culmination of a lively sequence of Africa-derived events in Bristol, starting with two nights of Afrobeat from Dele Sosimi‘s band at Jam Jar (Fri 4, Sat 5) and then there are two West African Mandingo stars: Diabel Cissokho (Canteen, Fri 11) and N’famady Kouyate (Jam Jar, game 17). The North African grooves of the guembri animate Gnawa Blues All-Stars (Canteen, Fri. 18) while the master Ghanaian drummer Baraka by Ben Badoo (Canteen Sat 19) takes African and Caribbean rhythms and merges them with danceable jazz. There is a similar contemporary fusion in the sound of Hele (The Lightship, Fri. 25). But back to the Jam Jar, there’s a chance to catch the desert guitar supremo justin adams in collaboration with the Moroccan virtuoso Gnawa guimbri Mohamed Errabbaa (Sun 27) – a sparkling meeting of minds at the heart of an expanded line-up.

But back to jazz… flamboyant trumpeter hero Organ Trio by Jonny Bruce hit the Bebop (Thursday 3) the same night as the piano trio Yetis monthly Pizza Express-style session at the Greenbank, as the singer Karolina GriskuteThe trio sneaks into El Rincon (Fri 4). Trumpet Andy Hague’s Double Standards Quartet appears at the Tobacco Factory (Sun 6) on the same day as the classic jazz and swing outfit Bill Frampton Jazz Trio feature in Hare on the Hill (Sun 6). Longtime Celtic Jazz Mergers Carmine appear as a trio at El Rincon (Thursday 10) while the main man of ‘tapas Tardis’ pete judge will perform solo piano at St George’s (Thursday 10), as part of a double program with Three trapped tigers keyboardist Tom Rogerson also appearing solo. Pete’s third album of solo piano compositions has just been released – how does he find the time? swing singer lucie moon appears in the Stag & Hounds (Sun 13), gypsy swingsters Schmoozenberg are at the Jam Jar (Sun 20), and Jack Calloway’s band celebrate light swing-jazz at the Fringe (Thursday 24). A big draw, however, should be the excellent Nu Civilization Orchestra (Thursday 24, St George’s), a big band full of talent The warrior of tomorrow protégés exploring the jazz side of Joni Mitchellespecially his work with Charlie Mingus. Singer ESKA takes on vocal duties but, judging by their previous Marvin Gaye project, the Orchestra’s many musicians will be just as eye-catching. And while his electric ladyband big band became a guitarist Denny Ilette deserved applause across the country, he reaps again in the heart of Santarnal (wise use of an r there!), a brilliant 5-track latin-jazz-psychedelia centered piece from the big band Santana (mar 29, Mr Wolf’s). And Mr Wolf’s hosts a buzzing new residency later on Sundays as keyboard ace every week Dan Moore and electric mixer matt jones welcome a new guest for a session. They Baileyblues/jazz guitarist Joe Wilkins goes first (sun 20) followed by Snapback fretmeister Eli Jitsuto (Sun 27).

You’ll find some of the best musicians in town with a soul-jazz singer/songwriter Pete Josef (Tue 1, Strange Brew) and Neo-soul multi-instrumentalists Mellowmatic are in the canteen (Fri 4). Another big highlight of the month will be the set of Glasgow corto.altoled by the effervescent trombonist Liam Shortall (Thur 4, Lost Horizon) with amazing drummer Graham Costello just one of the star players in the group. Past Jam Jar appearances have been brilliant groove-focused showcases with the backing of Berlin’s ultra-hip outfit Moses Yoofee this visit should be a belt. In the same way, Pete Cunninghamit’s very successful Ishmael Set (Thursday the 10th, Trinity) have brought their fusion of jazz, soul and dance music to international audiences since the pandemic, becoming one of the nation’s finest and most popular contemporary jazz bands. Likewise, uber-cool vibes from across the Atlantic are promised when the Try Thoughts star Sly5thAve plays Lost Horizon (Thursday 17), mixing freedom jazz, funk energy and hip-hop discipline. London based saxophone trio Jagama (Jeudi 24, Cantine) make a sophisticated mix of jazz, prog and ambient music. More straight ahead (in that New Orleans style), the New York Marching Band will fill the Old Market Assembly with the energy of Mardi Gras (Friday the 25th). Having first attracted attention with his dazzling guitar work in Kokoroko, Oscar JeromeGeorge Benson’s influences shine through in his solo work with his own band (Tuesday 29, Trinity).

In the meantime, back on the wild side…we’ve already mentioned Paul Dunmall’s quartet at Fringe Jazz (Wednesday 2nd) but November things start with the always unexpected Liquid Library (Mar 1, Cube) and Mr. Dunmall’s gig comes up against the Broken numbers 6tet (Wed 2,Cafe Kino), a multi-generational collective of familiar faces from the Bristol improv scene. This night also sees the Brunswick Rally at The Lightship, celebrating the fertile, free-thinking spirit of the late Bristol’s late Club Brunswick. This fifth bimonthly session features multi-instrumentalists Jennifer Evans. Probably the only forward-thinking hurdy-gurdy player to come to town on Friday the 4th when Einsturzende Neubaten veteran Alexander Hacke and Danielle de Picciottoduo hackedepicciotto bring a “dark ritual intensity” to the Crypt of Mount Sans. Abstract Experimental Composer Carmen Naughty creates new electroacoustic music with the Manchester Camerata at St George’s (Tuesday 8) while the Arnolfini host Circlea live performance installation collaboration of the Vilk Collective duo with the digital collective Calamari soup (Mar 11). And it’s great to see another Greatest Improv Hits session at Crofters (Wed 9) with bass/violin duo John Pope and John Garner as well as trumpet/violin duo Cirenne and the always unpredictable Big noise while inventing as you go.

And, of course, there are all those do-it-yourself jam sessions: every Sunday (Hepcat’s Hot Jazz Jam, Barrelhouse; Stag & Hounds jam session), Wednesdays (Donut Filler Jam, Mr Wolf’s) and Thursdays ( Jam & Toast, Old England), plus fortnightly JFS Jam Sessions (Mr Wolf’s, Tuesday). The Hare on the Hill has a Hot Jazz Jam (Wed 9) and the Canteen has its Jazz Jam Session (Wed 2), Stone Cold Funk Jam (Wed 16) and Canteen Latin Session (Tue 22).

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Jazzanova revisits techno classics live for the Guinness Cork Jazz Festival https://iridiumjazz.com/jazzanova-revisits-techno-classics-live-for-the-guinness-cork-jazz-festival/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazzanova-revisits-techno-classics-live-for-the-guinness-cork-jazz-festival/ As the birthplace of America’s automotive industry, Detroit was once the metal beating heart of America’s future. But by the late 1960s, the automobile-built city was hurtling toward dystopia as American auto giants were eclipsed by foreign rivals. This decline reached a critical mass in 1967 when riots broke out across the city. But out […]]]>

As the birthplace of America’s automotive industry, Detroit was once the metal beating heart of America’s future. But by the late 1960s, the automobile-built city was hurtling toward dystopia as American auto giants were eclipsed by foreign rivals. This decline reached a critical mass in 1967 when riots broke out across the city. But out of those cultural ashes was born something new at jazz label Strata – arguably behind Motown and the 1980s techno scene in the call of iconic musical movements to come from Detroit.

“Especially in the late ’60s and early ’70s, racism was rampant in America,” says Amir Abdullah, aka DJ Amir, the producer who curated a riveting reimagining of Strata’s greatest moments in collaboration with the collective of Berlin Jazz Jazzanova. The project is called Strata Records – The Sound of Detroit Reimagined by Jazzanova and it will come to life in Cork when Jazzanova perform at the city’s jazz festival, Everyman Theater on Friday October 28th.

Amir has life experience in jazz and hip-hop. In 2011, he founded the 180-Proof label, through which he oversees the reissue of the Strata catalog. He is a former vice-president of the Fat Beats label, worked in A&R at Rapster/!K7 and ran the Wax Poetics label from 2007 to 2010.

Like Motown, created by Berry Gordy with the help of a loan from his family, Strata was a triumph of determination in the face of formidable odds. For black Americans, especially in Detroit, there was no helping hand.

“There aren’t many opportunities for black people,” Amir says. “Nobody says ‘here’s a bag of money so you can do what you have to do’. You have to gather your resources, pull yourself together by your boots. And do it yourself.”

Strata was founded in 1969 by Kenny Cox, a bank manager turned jazz pianist. He had grown frustrated with his Blue Note label, which put him under constant pressure to achieve commercial success. Eager to pursue a more experimental direction, he founded Strata and soon hosted concerts by Miles Davis, Charles Mingus, Herbie Hancock and others.

He also began to release music, although during Strata’s lifetime the label released less than a dozen records – all highly sought after by collectors today. Perhaps the first to acclaim was the Lyman Woodard Organization’s Saturday Night Special LP – a jazz funk masterpiece initially mistaken by many for a Blaxploitation movie soundtrack.

Strata records reinvented by Jazzanova

There’s no better place to celebrate Detroit’s musical heritage than at the Cork Jazz Festival. Throughout its history, the festival has provided a platform for unsung voices in jazz. And it does again as the Jazzanovas remember Strata — and with it, Detroit’s contribution to popular music and culture.

“You have to understand Detroit and two really big riots – 1967 and 1968, which devastated the city,” says Amir. “And that was the epicenter of the civil rights movement in America. Strata came out of the ashes of it all. It definitely influenced the way they made music and how they wanted to be perceived by the general public in Detroit. , in terms of music.

“That’s why their nickname was ‘all music for all’. They wanted to be able to reach everyone, not just black people in Detroit. But the whites, the Hispanics. All the others. And for them to focus on something else, “oh my god, this building is burning”.

With the Jazzanova project, Amir hopes to challenge Detroit’s image as a post-apocalyptic Netherlands. “A lot of good music came out of that. Let’s not forget that Motown came from Detroit. Many of the most famous jazz musicians – Dorothy Ashby to Shirley Scott. They were from Detroit, or the Detroit area. A lot of great things came out of that fight in Detroit. It turns out they had those two riots – for good reason. I wanted to be able to tell another side of the Detroit story. Not just the creativity, but the intelligence behind the creativity.

The second goal is to make sure that Strata doesn’t slip between historical cracks. Amir would like to remind fans of modern jazz of the importance of the label, which has suffered for years from the scarcity of its releases.

“That is certainly one of the motivations for this project. The Strata story is so important. Besides the fact that they made a bunch of great music. To be honest, they only released [a handful] of recordings. I’ve released a lot of unreleased material over the past 10 years. Strata’s impact goes beyond that, he continues.

“A lot of people don’t know that Oberlin College, which is one of the great jazz conservatories in America, was started by Strata in 1970 [Kenny Cox helped devise the curriculum for the school]. It is one of the first jazz music conservatories created in America. Such a small label had a huge impact on the city. This story needs to be told. That’s one of the reasons I wanted to do something with Jazzanova. They would get it. And we would be able to do justice to the table and the story.

With Jazzanova on board, the tour will go one step further – bringing this music to life in a live environment. “The tour essentially showcases the catalog. It’s a bit like a musical story. From the catalog, streets of Detroit.

Strata never had a national distribution in America and therefore remained obscure in the United States. Even in Detroit, there were fears that the label would be wiped from history. Amir’s life’s work is to make sure that doesn’t happen.

“There are people to remember. For people, 40s, 50s, 60s and up…it’s there in the lexicon of people’s minds. They know Strata. They made an impact huge on the city, even though they were such a small label with a small production, the things they did really resonated with Detroit.

Strata lives, sometimes surprisingly. “He is still revered in many ways. Some of the guys from Strata taught at universities. Wayne State University, University of Michigan. Some of these guys I know through social media or whatever. They still talk and teach what Strata did. So at least the inheritance can be passed on.

  • Jazzanova brings the Strata Project to The Everyman, Cork on Friday 28th October at 6pm. Tickets via guinnesscorkjazz.com
Gogo Penguin and Amaro Freitas are among other artists performing at the Guinness Cork Jazz Festival
Gogo Penguin and Amaro Freitas are among other artists performing at the Guinness Cork Jazz Festival

Jazz Festival Tips: If you like Jazzanova, you might also like these…

  • GoGo Penguin, Everyman Friday October 28: The collective from Manchester mixes jazz, electronics, nu-jazz and ambient music.
  • Brandee Younger, St Peter’s, North Main Street, Friday to Monday: the New York harpist draws on jazz, soul, funk and classical music. His LP Pretend has been hailed by Rolling Stone as “an elegant cross-genre chill out”.
  • Portico Quartet, Everyman, Sunday: The Mercury Prize nominees build their ambient sound around the suspended steelpan-shaped drum.
  • MåsExödus With Omar & Jeru the Damaja, Everyman, Saturday: A dream collaboration between Dubliners Mark Murphy and Max Zaska attracts heavyweight international guests. Omar is the British soul legend behind the classic There’s Nothing Like This; while New York rapper Jeru collaborated with Gang Starr.
  • Amaro Freitas, Triskel, Saturday October 29: The famous Brazilian pianist adds the sounds of his native country to his contemporary jazz repertoire.
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Lena Bloch creates a new jazz suite in Brooklyn, October 16 https://iridiumjazz.com/lena-bloch-creates-a-new-jazz-suite-in-brooklyn-october-16/ Wed, 12 Oct 2022 02:35:39 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/lena-bloch-creates-a-new-jazz-suite-in-brooklyn-october-16/ On the 130th anniversary of the birth of Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva, at a time when immigrants, women and artists face a growing struggle in the United States, renowned Russian-born saxophonist and composer Lena Bloch creates My Name Is Marina, a commissioned jazz suite for ensemble and voice with his own English translations of works […]]]>

On the 130th anniversary of the birth of Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva, at a time when immigrants, women and artists face a growing struggle in the United States, renowned Russian-born saxophonist and composer Lena Bloch creates My Name Is Marina, a commissioned jazz suite for ensemble and voice with his own English translations of works by Tsvetaeva.

“Throughout my life, Tsvetaeva served as a model of resilience as an immigrant, an artist and a woman,” Bloch says, “all of these things having been beleaguered in modern political discourse, all the more reason to amplify her voice for a modern audience.”

Vocalist Kyoko Kitamura, pianist Jacob Sacks, bassist Ken Filiano and drummer Michael Sarin will join Bloch for the performance. The piece is commissioned by a grant from Chamber Music America’s Artistic Projects program, funded by the Howard Gilman Foundation and supporting New York-based projects. The show is supported by the Russian-American Cultural Center.

∙ Sunday, October 16, Scholes Street Studio, 375 Lorimer St., Brooklyn. In person and live. Free, donations accepted. For more information, call 718-964-8763 or visit https://www.scholesstreetstudio.com/. Live stream available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uG6PoLN26j4&feature=youtu.be.

My Name Is Marina was also performed on Sunday October 2 at the Marlene Meyerson JCC in Manhattan. Audio/video available. For more information, call 646-505-4444 or visit https://mmjccm.org/programs/person-my-name-marina-jazz-suite-celebrating-russian-poet-marina-tsvetaeva.

Tsvetaeva is considered one of the greatest poetesses of Russian and world literature of the 20th century. Although her work is revered in her native Russia and in Europe, she is less well known in the United States, unlike her contemporaries like Alexandr Blok, Anna Akhmatova and Boris Pasternak. Born in Moscow in 1892 to a teacher and a concert pianist, Tsvetaeva published her first collection of poems at the age of 18. She lived through turbulent years in Russian history, facing separation from her husband and children and leaving home to live in Berlin, Prague and Paris. . She eventually returned to the Soviet Union where her husband was executed and her surviving daughter was sent to a labor camp. After facing poverty, exile and great loss, she died in 1941. Her poems are known for their passion and lyricism, linguistic experimentation, the influence of folk songs and the portrayal of experiences women.

Bloch was also born in Moscow, immigrating to Israel and then to Europe, where she played jazz for 12 years before moving to New York in 2008 and quickly becoming a contributor to the city’s fertile jazz scene. His unique cultural background contributes to his original style, personal expression and wide range of influences, from Eastern European and Middle Eastern traditions to classical music of the 20th and 21st centuries.

As one of the first jazz artists to interpret Tsvetaeva’s poetry through music, Bloch uses her own English translations of Tsvetaeva’s work to improvise and reimagine the artist’s poetic legacy through her own composition lens. Bloch’s project introducing Tsvetaeva’s poetry to American audiences marks the 130th anniversary of Tsvetaeva’s birth (October 8).

According to Bloch, “Tsvetaeva’s themes are particularly relevant to this country of immigrants, now more than ever. Her poetry never lamented the status of a foreigner in a foreign land, never dwelt on loneliness or the isolation of a life in exile. Instead, her work celebrated the strength she drew from her uprooted existence: the power she had to speak freely despite all circumstances, the indomitable will to persevere. These aspects of his work resonate with me as a lifelong nomad, and they will resonate with countless immigrants to this country.”

Lena Bloch is a Russian-born saxophonist, composer and bandleader, based in New York since 2008. She has led her own chamber groups, performing original music since 1990, in Israel, Europe and the United States , notably at the Red Sea Jazz Festival (Israel), Leverkusener Jazz Tage and Ingolstaedter Jazz Tage (Germany), Jazz Lent Maribor (Slovenia), Voronezh Jazz Festival (Russia), Washington Women in Jazz Festival, Vermont Jazz Center Festival and Temple of the Arts Festival (USA). As a saxophonist, she has worked with Embryo, Steve Reid, Mala Waldron, Roberta Piket, Sumi Tonooka, Vishnu Wood, Harvey Diamond, Sébastien Ammann and many other American and European conductors. Performances of My Name Is Marina are supported and promoted by the
Russian-American Cultural Center (RACC).

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Jazz great Diana Krall and her trio captivated a sold-out Lied Center https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-great-diana-krall-and-her-trio-captivated-a-sold-out-lied-center/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 23:21:04 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-great-diana-krall-and-her-trio-captivated-a-sold-out-lied-center/ From the opening notes of “Where or When” to the final fade out of “Ophelia,” Diana Krall and her superb trio captivated a sold-out Lied Center for Performing Arts on Sunday with a standout 100 minutes of jazz from one of her most great contemporary practitioners. . Dressed in a shimmering green dress, Krall sat […]]]>

From the opening notes of “Where or When” to the final fade out of “Ophelia,” Diana Krall and her superb trio captivated a sold-out Lied Center for Performing Arts on Sunday with a standout 100 minutes of jazz from one of her most great contemporary practitioners. .

Dressed in a shimmering green dress, Krall sat at the piano, lead guitarist Anthony Wilson, bassist Robert Hurst and drummer Kareem Higgins through a set of standards that began with her breathy, quiet, and often slow contralto, then took over the trio and the tempo before returning to the spotlight for the solos of each of the players.

There were plenty of awe-inspiring moments and moving bits, especially as Hurst, who played in Jay Leno’s band “The Tonight Show,” demonstrated his virtuosity on subtly inventive solos like the one he played. during the Tommy Dorsey/Frank Sinatra track “East of the Sun, West of the Moon.

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Jazz singer Diana Krall will make her Lied Center debut in October

My favorite of the standards was a slowly building “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” that showcased her smooth, sometimes almost spoken vocals and, at the end, let the trio go wild with the fast but smooth attack. that permeated the concert.

Krall’s definition of “standards” and “jazz”, shall we say, expands the notion of both terms – as demonstrated by the encore that associates a beautiful version of Irving Berlin’s “How High the Moon” with rock ‘n’ roll mentioned above. Ophelia” from The Band.

And the show was highlighted by a Latin-tinged rolling version of Tom Waits’ “Hey Little Bird Fly Away Home”, which found Hurst and part of the audience snapping their fingers along with Riggins’ drum solo and a surprisingly moving rendition of Bob Dylan’s “A Simple Twist of Fate.

His peak, however, came with Krall literally in the limelight, playing alone and delivering a distinctive, elongated “A Case of You”, a Joni Mitchell classic that perfectly suited his vocal and musical approach.

Krall’s concert opened the Lied Center’s 2022-23 season. Suffice it to say, there may be others at the level she and her trio showcased on Sunday, but there won’t be others.

Photos: Luke Bryan performs a concert in a Nebraska farm field

Contact the writer at 402-473-7244 or kwolgamott@journalstar.com. On Twitter @KentWolgamott

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DSO will salute the era of prohibition and Latin jazz with concerts https://iridiumjazz.com/dso-will-salute-the-era-of-prohibition-and-latin-jazz-with-concerts/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 18:20:01 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/dso-will-salute-the-era-of-prohibition-and-latin-jazz-with-concerts/ The Detroit Symphony Orchestra’s PNC Pops series features two very different themed programs taking place over two weekends this month. “Prohibition: Cabarets and Speakasies of the Era” arrives this weekend, while “Hot Latin Sounds with the Mambo Kings” is slated for October 16. “Prohibition”, played on Saturdays and Sundays, evokes the gin joints and smoky […]]]>

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra’s PNC Pops series features two very different themed programs taking place over two weekends this month. “Prohibition: Cabarets and Speakasies of the Era” arrives this weekend, while “Hot Latin Sounds with the Mambo Kings” is slated for October 16.

“Prohibition”, played on Saturdays and Sundays, evokes the gin joints and smoky music halls of the 1920s and 1930s in New York, Paris, Berlin, London and Atlantic City. Conductor Jeff Tyzik and singers Myra Maud, Bronson Norris Murphy and Madison Claire Parks will lead the audience through a program that includes “La Vie en rose”, “Puttin’ on the Ritz”, “St. Louis Blues” and “Mack the Knife”, originally from Kurt Weill’s “Threepenny Opera”.

“This whole period was really tumultuous around the world,” Tyzik said, “when you consider Prohibition leading up to the Great Depression and everything that happened in people’s lives. It was very dramatic. And the music actually tells a story because in every generation the music that comes out of it is a reflection of the human condition, in this case we see that reflected in “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime” and then two years later, “We’re in the Money.” The music tells a story.

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The greatest female jazz artist of her generation will open the Lied Center season on Sunday https://iridiumjazz.com/the-greatest-female-jazz-artist-of-her-generation-will-open-the-lied-center-season-on-sunday/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 20:52:32 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-greatest-female-jazz-artist-of-her-generation-will-open-the-lied-center-season-on-sunday/ Diana Krall grew up in Vancouver, British Columbia, listening to her father’s collection of 78 rpm records and falling in love with the piano, which she mastered after a stint at the prestigious Berklee College of Music. She was encouraged to add vocals to her piano by the late Jimmy Rowles, with whom she studied […]]]>

Diana Krall grew up in Vancouver, British Columbia, listening to her father’s collection of 78 rpm records and falling in love with the piano, which she mastered after a stint at the prestigious Berklee College of Music.

She was encouraged to add vocals to her piano by the late Jimmy Rowles, with whom she studied as a teenager in the early 80s. “We shared a love for songs, especially obscure ones, and it comes to say in that rocky tone, ‘If you want to sing, just sing,'” she told New Jersey Stage.






Canadian jazz musician Diana Krall, seen in Hungary in 2016, will make her Lincoln debut on Sunday at the Lied Center for Performing Arts.


MTI


That’s exactly what Krall has done, and over the past four decades has become the most acclaimed female jazz artist of her generation.

Krall, who will make her Lincoln debut at the Lied Center for Performing Arts on Sunday, is the only jazz singer to have debuted on eight albums atop the Billboard Jazz Albums chart.

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She has won two Grammy Awards and 10 Junos (the Canadian Grammy). Nine of his 15 albums have gone gold, three platinum and seven multi-platinum. His 1999 album “When I Look in Your Eyes” spent an unprecedented 52 weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard chart.

And in 2009, Billboard named her the second-greatest artist of the decade. It’s a position she may well continue to hold today, arguably the most widely recognized star in the jazz universe.

Here’s how she was described by the New York Times in 2017:

“Since Ms. Krall began a recording career in the early 1990s, her screen-siren looks and seductive alto – a cool yet sultry voice, wielded with a rhythmic sophistication and understatement drawn from years of leadership with his other instrument – have provided, for some, an almost unattainable aura of glamour.

Adding to that glamour, she is part of one of the most enduring celebrity marriages of the 21st century. Married to British singer-songwriter Elvis Costello at Elton John’s estate near London in 2003, the couple have a set of 16-year-old twins.

Since “Stepping Out,” her self-financed debut album in 1993, Krall has been one of the main stewards of the Great American Songbook, recording and performing songs that she finds fully alive and open to new interpretations.

“It’s not about one period or one demographic,” Krall told The Times. “It’s about finding romance in everything, in beauty or in sad things.”

Her most recent album, 2020’s “This Dream of You,” is titled after the Bob Dylan song she covered on the record which includes songs associated with Nat “King” Cole and Frank Sinatra as well as ” How Deep is the Ocean” by Irving Berlin and the classic “Singing in the Rain”.

After spending the pandemic in quarantine with Costello and their sons, Krall spins behind this album with his trio and will open the 2022-23 Lied season with his set of, albeit little-known, standards on Sunday.

Contact the writer at 402-473-7244 or kwolgamott@journalstar.com. On Twitter @KentWolgamott

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Kateryna Kravchenko becomes second Grizzly Jazz Foundation award winner – London Jazz News https://iridiumjazz.com/kateryna-kravchenko-becomes-second-grizzly-jazz-foundation-award-winner-london-jazz-news/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 07:51:05 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/kateryna-kravchenko-becomes-second-grizzly-jazz-foundation-award-winner-london-jazz-news/ New The Grizzly Jazz Foundation owes its name to the nickname of its founder, Dr. Andreas Hoeft (1954-2020), a leading figure in intensive medicine and anesthesiology in Bonn, who was also a big fan of jazz. The foundation has just announced its second winner, whom it will support for the next two years with an […]]]>

New

The Grizzly Jazz Foundation owes its name to the nickname of its founder, Dr. Andreas Hoeft (1954-2020), a leading figure in intensive medicine and anesthesiology in Bonn, who was also a big fan of jazz. The foundation has just announced its second winner, whom it will support for the next two years with an endowment of 20,000 euros.

Kateryna Kravchenko (with Lars Danielsson in the background) . Photo credit: Norbert Ittermann Deutsche Telekom AG

The first winner was Alma Naidu, and the second is the jazz singer Kateryna Kravchenko (born in 1999). Kravchenko is from Ukraine, came to Germany to study in Dresden in 2018 and lives in Berlin. The announcement was made during a “United for Ukraine” gala concert at the Telekom Forum in Bonn.

The foundation’s citation reads: “In addition to her great musical talent and engaging stage presence, Kateryna won us over with her thirst for knowledge, her courage and her unconditional enthusiasm for jazz. We look forward to accompanying him in his next steps. Board Chairman Dr. Christian Cassebaum works on a voluntary basis with fellow board members Dr. Sabine Hoeft and Dr. Anke Steinbeck to increase the visibility of young musicians by providing organizational support or organizing representation. Part of the grant will fund Kravchenko’s debut CD. Kravchenko will also benefit from targeted mentorship and access to a substantial music industry network and other contacts based around the foundation. Bonn is the base for some of Germany’s major state-funded national music organisations.

LINKS: Grizzly Foundation website

Kateryna Kravchenko

LJN cover of Alma Naidu

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