Germany – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 14:23:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Germany – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 Universal Music Group is running a series of promotions in the Global Classics and Jazz division https://iridiumjazz.com/universal-music-group-is-running-a-series-of-promotions-in-the-global-classics-and-jazz-division/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 14:23:26 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/universal-music-group-is-running-a-series-of-promotions-in-the-global-classics-and-jazz-division/ Universal Music Group (UMG) has carried out a series of strategic promotions within the management team within its Global Classics & Jazz (GCJ) division. UMG says these appointments “reflect the company’s continued commitment to growth” and will provide “targeted resources to accelerate the transformation of its international business and its market-leading classical and jazz labels.” […]]]>

Universal Music Group (UMG) has carried out a series of strategic promotions within the management team within its Global Classics & Jazz (GCJ) division.

UMG says these appointments “reflect the company’s continued commitment to growth” and will provide “targeted resources to accelerate the transformation of its international business and its market-leading classical and jazz labels.”

Based in London and effective January 11, 2022, Liz Chew assumes a new role of Senior Director, Global Priorities – Marketing, after spending two years as Director, International Marketing.

Chew joined UMG in 2011 from EMI Classics and has run campaigns for names like Andrea Bocelli including her number one album. Yes and Ludovico Einaudi’s cinema, with music from his Oscar-winning and BAFTA-winning films.

In October, Bocelli signed an exclusive and extensive global recording contract with UMG. The global strategic partnership saw Bocelli sign directly with UMG for the first time after more than 25 years of collaboration.

Chew has also worked on campaigns for artists like Ennio Morricone, Luciano Pavarotti, Cecilia Bartoli and Ólafur Arnalds.

She will lead a team spanning London and Berlin, creating global campaigns for a range of projects across UMG’s Global Classics & Jazz roster, as well as supporting new, emerging and developing artists.

Rachel Tregenza expands her role to become Senior Director, Global Priorities – Communications and Artistic Strategy, after two years leading the division’s public relations and designing international album campaigns for classical and jazz artists including Max Richter, Lang Lang, Sheku and Isata Kanneh-Mason. , Víkingur Ólafsson and Gregory Porter.

She also worked alongside Chew on Bocelli’s Music for hope peak event, a live performance that drew three million simultaneous viewers, says UMG.

Tregenza will focus on new audiences for classical and jazz, driving artist strategy while working alongside label colleagues, artists and UMG Global Communications.

George Irwin is also promoted to the newly created role of Audience & Analytics Manager, reporting to Paul Moseley, SVP, Content & Data.

UMG says these promotions are “indicative of the company’s support for employee development and innovation within the leadership team of Global Classics & Jazz.”

Over the past two years, the successes of UMG’s GCJ division have ranged from Andrea Bocelli’s livestream at the Duomo in Milan to Jon Batiste’s 11 Grammy nominations, in part produced by LA-based producer Tearce Kizzo, who spoke to MBW in December.

“These new appointments represent the constant evolution of our international activity.

Sam Jackson, World Classics and Jazz,

Sam Jackson, EVP, Global Classics & Jazz, said: “These new appointments represent the constant evolution of our international business.

“This exceptional team will support expansion and diversification in the key areas of international marketing, communications, artist strategy and audience analysis.

“Focused on realizing the diverse creative ambitions of our artists, they will work with our labels and partners, offering their global expertise and unmatched vision. “

“These changes mark the final step in our mission to provide top-notch service to our amazing artists. “

Dickon Stainer, World Classics and Jazz

Dickon Stainer, President and CEO, Global Classics & Jazz comments: “These changes mark the final step in our mission to provide best-in-class service to our incredible artists and to these genres of music that are of global cultural significance. and are of great importance to us at UMG.Music trade around the world

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Chicago Progressive Jazz Rock Band Performs Monday at The Other Side in Kearney | Recent news https://iridiumjazz.com/chicago-progressive-jazz-rock-band-performs-monday-at-the-other-side-in-kearney-recent-news/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 23:15:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/chicago-progressive-jazz-rock-band-performs-monday-at-the-other-side-in-kearney-recent-news/ Marbin, a progressive jazz-rock band from Chicago, will perform at 9 p.m. Monday at The Other Side at 15 E. 24th St. in Kearney. Dani Rabin, courtesy By RICK BROWN, Yard Light Media KEARNEY – Dani Rabin understands a valuable way to learn about progressive jazz. “If you immerse yourself enough in the music, you […]]]>





Marbin, a progressive jazz-rock band from Chicago, will perform at 9 p.m. Monday at The Other Side at 15 E. 24th St. in Kearney.


Dani Rabin, courtesy


By RICK BROWN, Yard Light Media

KEARNEY – Dani Rabin understands a valuable way to learn about progressive jazz.

“If you immerse yourself enough in the music, you start to learn the vocabulary,” said the Chicago guitarist. “If you go to New Orleans and listen to the music long enough, you’ll understand it eventually.”

He thinks that most casual jazz fans know little about what makes music fascinating, just as most Led Zeppelin fans don’t know why they love this music. But they do. And that’s where the magic comes in.

Rabin has added a stop to perform at The Other Side in Kearney as part of his band, Marbin’s tour. The band will perform at 9 p.m. Monday.

The core of the group formed in Israel in 2007 when Rabin met saxophonist Danny Markovich. They moved to the United States and settled in the Chicago area where they released their first album in 2009, creating the band’s name by adding the first three letters of Markovitch’s name to the last three letters of Rabin’s name: MAR + BIN.

Marbin has performed at top venues across the country and at festivals across the country including The Jazz Showcase, Frozen Dead Guy Days, Magic Bag, Gilly’s, Andy’s Jazz Club, Green Mill, and Chicago Jazz Festival. In 2011, the group toured the East Coast and Midwest with super fusion group Scott Henderson, Mike Clark and Jeff Berlin.

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How a Berlin jazz singer inspired this David Bowie classic https://iridiumjazz.com/how-a-berlin-jazz-singer-inspired-this-david-bowie-classic/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 08:30:36 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/how-a-berlin-jazz-singer-inspired-this-david-bowie-classic/ Two years before David Bowie started recording his 1977 album Hero in a seedy studio in West Berlin, the city vibrated with a different sound. In 1975 a jazz-prog fusion group known as Messengers released his first album first message. Born under the oppressive shadow of the Berlin Wall, the band’s music was a vehicle […]]]>

Two years before David Bowie started recording his 1977 album Hero in a seedy studio in West Berlin, the city vibrated with a different sound. In 1975 a jazz-prog fusion group known as Messengers released his first album first message. Born under the oppressive shadow of the Berlin Wall, the band’s music was a vehicle of exploration; containing seeds of everything from Stravinsky to Sun Ra.

The album’s opening track, “Hankock’s Hideaway,” for example, begins with a rising violin passage of intense pastoral beauty. Slowly, Rhodes piano lights enter the mix. At the same time, the modulations of a sparkling synthesizer evoke the mechanical chorus of dawn of countless birds. And then suddenly everything stops and a breakbeat kicks in. What follows is one of the most surprisingly diverse jazz fusion recordings to come out of Germany in the 1970s, and Bowie’s producer Tony Visconti, had the chance to hear part of it. live. In fact, Messengers singer Allison Maass would go on to feature on one of the most contagious tracks on Hero.

David Bowie was introduced to Allison Maass by Tony Visconti, who had seen Maass’s band Messengers perform at a small Berlin jazz club after a day in the studio. “One night at a club, I heard Antonia Maass sing with her band and the next day I told David how great she was,” Visconti recalls in 2017. We tried her on “Beauty And” The Beast ”. David was very impressed. Shortly after, he had her jump through hoops (vocal) for her to sing while at the top of her range. He also asked her to sing ‘liebling’ as an alternative to ‘darling’, bringing a little Berlin flavor to the song.

Visconti quickly developed feelings for Maass, who had been bubbling below the surface since that night in the jazz club. But – being a married man – the couple were forced to keep their relationship a secret, leading some to argue that Maass and Visconti were the couple that inspired Bowie’s quote about lovers kissing “by the wall.” in “Heroes”.

The couple would indeed spend long afternoons wandering around the east-west border together, but, according to Maass, it must have been another couple. After all, she and Visconti were too aware of keeping their affair hidden from his wife to risk kissing in such a public place. No, the romance between Alison Maass and Tony Visconti was never allowed to emerge. Instead, they were forced to distill their affection for each other into reels of magnetic tape, the quiver of which can still be heard today.

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Looking for a new groove? Jazz host Michael Stratton brings his show to WKAR https://iridiumjazz.com/looking-for-a-new-groove-jazz-host-michael-stratton-brings-his-show-to-wkar/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/looking-for-a-new-groove-jazz-host-michael-stratton-brings-his-show-to-wkar/ WKAR welcomes Michael Stratton to its weekend lineup as the host of a new local jazz program. Stratton was the longtime host of The midnight vinyl side on Lansing Community College radio station. His new show is broadcast on Saturdays from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Scott Pohl of WKAR spoke with Stratton about the […]]]>

WKAR welcomes Michael Stratton to its weekend lineup as the host of a new local jazz program.

Stratton was the longtime host of The midnight vinyl side on Lansing Community College radio station. His new show is broadcast on Saturdays from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Scott Pohl of WKAR spoke with Stratton about the program. He says he doesn’t run until midnight, he needed a new title.

Interview highlights

On Stratton’s approach to the show

Jazz is not just a genre of music, and recorded jazz is now over 100 years old. I want to sample from the whole jazz dictionary, so we’re going to dive back into Louis Armstrong. … and move it to the present day, you know, hip hop fans who will see some kind of a cross between jazz and hip hop.

On the kind of curved balls Stratton likes to throw at listeners

Most importantly, for me, a very local flavor. We are really lucky to have world class musicians in this community. I hate to even call it local, because these guys are world class. They perform all over the world and I really want to incorporate some of their music and interviews of some of the local talent that we have here.

Interview transcript

Michael Stratton: Yeah, so I thought about it and thought of some clever tracks that I had heard before, and thought that one of my favorite artists was John Coltrane, and one of my tracks from favorite music is Supreme love, and i just thought alright, how about A Supreme Groove? This involves not only the homage to Coltrane and all that musical period, the Impulse and Blue Note years, but also to other types of music parallel to jazz such as rhythm and blues, blues and soul. I’m just a fan of it all, and it will all be incorporated into the new show a bit.

Scott Pohl: Will this be the show’s theme song?

Stratton: This will be the theme song of the show, A Supreme Groove from Supreme Love.

Pohl: Tell me about your approach to the show. Old music, new music, a mix?

Stratton: Jazz is not just a genre of music, and recorded jazz is now over 100 years old. I want to sample from the whole jazz dictionary, so we’re going to dive back into Louis Armstrong. In fact, the first week I will play West End Blues, which is just a classic, but you hear that the blues is entrenched in jazz from the start, and move it to the present day, you know, hip hop fans who will see a kind of cross between the jazz and hip hop. Jazz has always been influenced by other popular music. This has always been the case, whether they play Irving Berlin tunes or show tunes, and whether they are currently influenced by the Beatles or hip-hop songs. I want to encompass everything, and I like to straighten my listeners’ ears every now and then by throwing a curve ball at them. Just something that thrills them, you know? So that will also be integrated.

Pohl: I think these curved balls can make any show interesting. Do you have an example of what you mean by this?

Stratton: Well, I hate to give it away, but you know, for example, I’ll be playing Robert Johnson in the first show. I have a trio from Brooklyn, three guys who play cello and flute and bass, and they play kind of a hip hop rhythm, but they play jazz but it also has a kind of classic flavor, and their name is Project Trio. So I’m going to play that kind of stuff with a lot of classic songs and a lot of contemporary stuff. And then, most importantly, for me, a very local flavor. We are really lucky to have world class musicians in this community. I even hate to call it local, because these guys are world class. They perform all over the world and I really want to incorporate some of their music and interviews of some of the local talent that we have here.

Pohl: You intrigued me with the word from a jazz version of Smells like Teen Spirit you will be using on the show at some point.

Stratton: Robert Glasper. He’s a great artist. He started off, you know, kinda in the footsteps of a Herbie Hancock maybe, he was very straight ahead. Then he realized that a lot of his roots were in hip hop, and so he went out with an electric band and formed a band called Black Radio Experiment, The Robert Glasper Experiment, and the albums he has. released under this name are really classics of the genre. And so, listeners who don’t know this, I think, will be delighted.

A Groove Supreme airs Saturdays from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on 90.5 WKAR-FM.

This conversation has been edited for clarity and brevity.

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Chelsea Carmichael, Ayanda Sikade, Christian McBride and more https://iridiumjazz.com/chelsea-carmichael-ayanda-sikade-christian-mcbride-and-more/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 14:58:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/chelsea-carmichael-ayanda-sikade-christian-mcbride-and-more/ Tate was an incredible writer at the sentence-by-sentence level. He reconstructed the art of criticism in his own image, and his thoughts on the artists he covered left heads spinning. From Giddins, I learned to listen to jazz, and what to listen to; from Tate, I learned to make unhistorical connections between seemingly unrelated songs, […]]]>

Tate was an incredible writer at the sentence-by-sentence level. He reconstructed the art of criticism in his own image, and his thoughts on the artists he covered left heads spinning. From Giddins, I learned to listen to jazz, and what to listen to; from Tate, I learned to make unhistorical connections between seemingly unrelated songs, albums and artists, and how far you could stretch the English language to make it do what you wanted to do. It was something I already knew, from Hunter S. Thompson and William Burroughs and to some extent, I guess, from Lester Bangs, but Tate’s writing had more vitality and heart than any of the their. And more important than that, his work taught me the dark genius from within. He spoke of the artists he covered in a way no one else did, never condescending or treating them with an undeserved reverence. He has given enough thought to their work to convince you, reader / listener, that they deserve your serious attention. Tate’s writing opened a portal to a new world and provided a roadmap.

Surprisingly, he also had this effect on his peers. In a tribute to NPR, Giddins opened up about how Tate inspired him to hear Wayne Shorter again. “I had responded fondly to a few of his pieces, like ‘Infant Eyes’, the swarming ‘The All Seeing Eye’ and the heartbreaking version of ‘Dindi’, but I found most of his work to be clever and cool, even the unforgettable melodies like ‘Footprints’ and ‘Orbits’; I admired him more than I loved him, “he wrote.” Tate’s writing changed my assessment, brought me closer from the heart of his music, so that I listened more deeply and with much greater feedback. ”

Somehow my little white town library has a copy of Tate’s 1992 anthology. Flyboy in Buttermilk, and I’m not exaggerating when I say it got the best of me. The plays on King Sunny Ade and Cecil Taylor and Miles Davis were eye-opening. Davis’s article, a lengthy two-part essay that originally took place in DownBeat in 1985, was particularly astonishing because at that time, at the time of You are under arrest, nobody gave Bitches Brew serious consideration, whatever In the corner Where Agharta. But there was Tate who said things like, “In 1975, Miles, through his decades-old practice of paying cats to train at the bandstand, formed the first group of Acid. -funk entirely improvised in the world – by that I mean a group capable of orchestrating motifs in an extemporaneous way. by Santana, Funkadelic, Sly [Stone], Stockhausen, Africa, India and Ohio players (watch how their 1974 hit “Fire” is revamped on Agharta‘s first side). ”

The way Tate made connections that you didn’t make yourself made you want to go listen to more music, in order to come back and hear more clearly the second time around. Reading one of his plays was like hanging out with that older friend who would go to the record store with you and approve or change your selections: “Yeah, you need that; you should also hear this one; have you ever heard that? No, skip that; the album before this one is better.

A perfect example of this is how this four-sentence half-paragraph of Pilot opened for me the music of Cecil Taylor. Tate wrote: “The basic elements of a lot of Cecil Taylor’s solo or improv (improvised composition) performances are two types of patterns which I will call Figure A and Figure B. Figure A consists of randomly hammered discords. that emerge as a beginner’s luck. Or maybe at best like the 30s monster film music. Figure B is a variable speed tonal spiral usually shaded by melodic variations. This figure I think Cecil finds a bit romantic; I know yes. Tate expands on this monster movie analogy in the remainder of this paragraph and elucidates more aspects of Taylor’s game. But these four sentences are more than enough; try listening to any Cecil solo now without hearing it through Tate’s ears.

As a journalist / interviewer his mental processes were equally fascinating. Pilot included a profile of Ornette Coleman that focused on her clothing and the importance of visual presentation; his 2016 sequel Flyboy 2: Reader Greg Tate contained an interview with Wayne Shorter which revealed that the famous gnomic saxophonist revealed more about his childhood and his non-musical life than I have ever read in any other article about him. These types of features taught me that when interviewing an artist you shouldn’t worry about what you think might make a good story later – you should just ask them what you want to know, and take the path. conversation anywhere. goes.

At the turn of the century, Tate – who had co-founded the Black Rock Coalition and led a few bands in the past – launched his best-known musical project, Burnt Sugar the Arkestra Chamber. I was obsessed with their music, which combined jazz, funk, soul, rock, hip-hop and more in a whirlwind of directed improvisation, from the first time I heard it. I’ve seen them live at the Vision Festival twice, first in 2005 (their performance was recorded for the live double CD If you can’t dazzle them with your glow, then baffle them with your happiness; an excerpt is above) and again in 2012. I included them in the last chapter of my 2005 book Running The Voodoo Down: the electric music of Miles Davis, as descendants of his work, and questioned Tate about their methodology and aesthetic. Surprisingly, he also agreed to present the book. To have someone whose writing meant so much to me and opened so many mental doors, put a figurative hand on my shoulder and say that I was on the right track in my own work, it was amazing. Two years later, I edited the anthology Marooned: The Next Generation of Desert Island Discs, a sequel to the 1979 book Failed, in which notable rock critics chose the only album they would take to a desert island. Tate contributed to an article on Bitches Brew it was short but brilliantly incisive and autobiographical. His presence appeared to me again as a seal of legitimacy.

A few years later, I lectured at the annual EMP Pop talk on Miles Davis’ 1980s albums, and Tate was in the audience, listening. We spoke, too briefly, in the hallway afterwards. The last time I saw him in person was in 2017, when the trio of Harriet Tubman and saxophonist James Brandon Lewis (with Anthony Pirog on guest guitar) performed at the Cell Theater. Again, we only spoke for a few minutes, but Tate still seemed like someone who would be there forever; I would see him somewhere on the road. People say “never meet your heroes”, but I wish I had spent more time with Greg Tate. There will never be another like him.

Jazz suffered another major loss this month, with pianist Barry Harris passing away at 91. Born in Detroit, he started recording at age 21 and moved to New York a decade later. Since the end of the 1960s he had lived in a house belonging to Baroness Pannonica de Koenigswarter; Thelonious Monk also lived there during his later years, and he and Harris became friends.

Harris has dedicated his entire life and career to bebop. He had no interest in electric instruments, free jazz or any other development after the early 1960s. His style had an almost magical lyricism, harmonic complexity and melodic sophistication and never evolved into music. dinner music. He’s performed on incredible albums including The Sidewinder by Lee Morgan and Gettin ‘Around by Dexter Gordon, and highlights from his own catalog include Living in Tokyo, At the jazz workshop, and Barry Harris plays Tadd Dameron. Like Charles McPherson, whom I interviewed in May’s column, he viewed bebop as the ultimate form of music and spent decades exploring it and, more importantly, passing on what he learned to others. others. Although he was never a formal educator, he held master classes and workshops for decades, and generations of jazz musicians came to his home or wherever he needed to study with him. In a world where every young player seems to have a mastery, the direct learning model of older musicians imparting knowledge to the next generation on the bandstand and in the studio is largely lost, and with the passing of Barry Harris , something very real has gone.

And now, new music!

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Wiffle Ball, Dr. Seuss, Jazz, Foot Rubs, and more in today’s FUN10! https://iridiumjazz.com/wiffle-ball-dr-seuss-jazz-foot-rubs-and-more-in-todays-fun10/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 15:09:44 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/wiffle-ball-dr-seuss-jazz-foot-rubs-and-more-in-todays-fun10/ Every Sunday we launch a new Fun10, to give you a head start on your week and a glimpse of what’s going on over the next seven days. Check out Fun10 every Sunday for details on ten awesome events happening in the city. It’s cool read and a great way to start planning your entertainment […]]]>

Every Sunday we launch a new Fun10, to give you a head start on your week and a glimpse of what’s going on over the next seven days. Check out Fun10 every Sunday for details on ten awesome events happening in the city. It’s cool read and a great way to start planning your entertainment for the week.

FUN10 – ten ways for you to have fun in the Quad-Cities, this week and every week, every Sunday, only on your site for local entertainment, free and fun, QuadCities.com!

The 2nd Annual Bettendorf High School Wiffle Ball Tournament will take place on Wednesday, December 22!

Have fun with friends and help support the BHS Baseball Team at their 2nd Annual Wiffle Ball Tournament on Wednesday, December 22!

Take a walk in a “winter wonderland” with Circa ’21

For the holiday 2021 theatrical production in its spectacular 44th season of live entertainment, Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse is giving family audiences a special holiday gift: the Christmas musical WINTER WONDERLAND. This festive charm on stage will charm Wise Men Ninja Wizards, Forty-Two, That Barrage Shopping Trip, and more in this week's FUN10the audience with its magical mix of laughs, feelings and beloved songs from the past, and it is led by a wonderful team of professional talents.

WINTER WONDERAND will be performing at Circa ’21 until December 29, with performances on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:45 p.m., Sundays at 5:45 p.m. and Wednesday mornings at 1:30 p.m. Ticket prices are of $ 53.55 for the evening supper and show and $ 46.73 for the mornings on the plate.

Reservations are available through the Circa ’21 ticket office. To reserve, contact the theater at 1828 Third Ave., Rock Island, IL. or by calling 309-786-7733 ext.2.

In this heartwarming musical tale, a father wishes to celebrate an old-fashioned Christmas like those of his youth leads him and his family, first to a historic Christmas tree farm, then on a magical journey to 1921 , where he learns that while it is important to remember the past, the best way to keep the tradition alive is to enjoy the Christmas present! Written for Circa 21 by longtime Bootlegger and frequent mainstage actor Brad Hauskins, WINTER Wise Men Ninja Wizards, Forty-Two, That Barrage Shopping Trip, and more in this week's FUN10WONDERLAND is a nostalgic celebration of family that will leave audiences of all ages filled with the peace and joy of the holiday season.

Hauskins’ musical revue was originally presented at Circa ’21 during the holidays of 2000, and although its new version retains the title, setting, and characters of the old show, it is now staged with a new script and a new score of old favorites arranged and orchestrated by the author, Laura Hammes and Mason Moss. As Hauskins explained about this new WINTER WONDERLAND, you’ll hear a lot of traditional Christmas music, but a little different from what we did 20 years ago. And all the songs are songs of that [1921] era, but they’re not necessarily all Christmas themed · there’s Irving Berlin and other songs that we’ve kind of incorporated into the storytelling.

He continued, there is a word in the song ‘Winter Wise Men Ninja Wizards, Forty-Two, That Barrage Shopping Trip, and more in this week's FUN10Wonderland ‘which weighs heavily in the series:’ To face fearlessly the plans we have made. ‘ And for me, that was the hook of what I’m trying to say. This is what it means to live today. We make plans, we celebrate this holiday despite everything that is wrong and we face our projects without fear. It’s a really fitting statement for what we’re trying to do.

Sean McCall, former artistic director of the Old Creamery Theater in Amana, Iowa, directed WINTER WONDERLAND for Circa ’21. Wrigley Mancha (Matilda: The Musical from the Quad City Music Guild), Mark Leo McGinn (The Drowsy Chaperone from the Music Guild) and local eighth-grader Cameryn Bergthold, and seven familiar talents return to the Rock Island stage: Ashley Mills Becher (Saturday Night Fever), Bobby Becher (Irving Berlin’s Holiday Inn), Derrick Bertram (Newsies), Erica Lee Bigelow (Disenchanted), Savannah Bay Strandin (Beehive: The ’60s Musical), Tristan Layne Tapscott (Kinky Boots), and Krianna Walljasper (Annie).

The entire Circa ’21 team are delighted to welcome the returning audience for the holidays following last year’s unforeseen season and urge guests to book early for what will undoubtedly be an unforgettable night of magic and cheerfulness on stage. Call 309-786-7733 ext. 2 for reservations and treat your whole family to the glorious onstage celebration that is WINTER WONDERLAND!

Live on Tuesday evening, it’s Trivia Night Live!

Trivia Night Live rolls in The Tangled Wood in Bettendorf every Tuesday at 7pm!
It is Mother's Day at Beaux Arts, Ale Trail, a 'Hamilton' star in town and more in today's FUN10!Free To Play, with up to eight people per team playing in different categories.

What is Trivia Night Live?

Trivia Night Live is a live interactive team trivia game played at your favorite restaurants and bars. The game consists of four sets of questions of increasing difficulty and point values. The categories range from news, history, geography, science, sports and more….

Trivia Night Live is free and you can have up to 8 members on a team.

Prizes are awarded to the 1st half winner and total winners earn a gift card of $ 25 for 1st place, $ 10 for 2nd place (cannot be used on the same night).

We ask a question, then play a song. Your team has the duration of this song to give your answer. No mobiles. web devices or smartwatches can be used, just unnecessary trivial knowledge held between your ears.

#LiveFromDavenportItsTriviaNight

presented by Think & Drink Entertainment.

Mother's Day at Beaux Arts, Ale Trail, a 'Hamilton' star in town and more in today's FUN10!Bootleg Hill Open Mic every Thursday

Are you looking for a place to showcase your talents?

How about Bootleg Hill’s open mic party?

The open mic musical evening is back. Happening weekly at Bootleg Hill Honey Meads in downtown Davenport. Everyone is welcome. Hosted by Dan Fennesy and from 8 p.m.

Winter nights Winter lights illuminating the QC

The Quad City Botanical Center is proud to announce that MidAmerican Energy Company is the presenting sponsor of the fifth annual Winter Nights Winter Lights.

The outdoor gardens will be in winter bloom with over 160,000 glowing lights, featuring our largest lighted display to date. Explore the Sun Garden, Kindergarten, Lawns, Pond and Pocket Gardens from our outdoor light exhibit while learning about our biggest fundraiser of the year.

Bundle up, stroll the gardens at night, and visit the outdoor events canopy for hot chocolate and treats to buy from Taste Buds, a downtown Rock Island company that we are proud of. associate.

Bring the kids for free crafts to make and take away or plan your visit at one of our special event nights.

New this year, Botanical Center members and FunBundle members will receive free admission Wednesday evenings during the exhibition. Memberships can be purchased at qcgardens.com.

Winter Nights Winter lights illuminating the Quad City Botanical Center on Rock IslandDATES AND TIMES OF THE EXHIBITIONS

Dec 15 – Jan. 2, every day *, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

* HOLIDAY CALENDAR

Open New Year’s Day and New Year’s Eve.

Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve and Christmas.

GENERAL ADMISSION

$ 8 adults, $ 4 youth 2-15, under 2 free

Members of the Center botanique du Québec and FunBundle members

receive $ 2 off admission

Quad City Botanical Center members and FunBundle members enjoy free entry on Wednesday evenings for the duration of the exhibition. Members must present a membership card at the entrance.

Tickets available on qcgardens.com.

Winter Nights Winter lights illuminating the Quad City Botanical Center on Rock IslandSPECIAL EVENTS

FREE NIGHTS FOR MEMBERS

WEDNESDAY, until 1/2, 5-9 p.m.

Members must present a membership card at the entrance. Advanced tickets not required. Free for Botanical Center members and FunBundle members

APPOINTMENT NIGHTS

12/30 THURSDAY, 6-9 p.m.

Enjoy live music from Roger Carlson and seasonal cocktails indoors at the cash bar. Snacks and hot chocolate provided.

$ 20 couple, $ 10 individual

Celebrate Christmas with Julotta

The Christmas tradition of “Julotta” returns to Bishop Hill State Historic Site. All are invited to attend a non-denominational church service at 6 a.m. on Christmas Day, Saturday, December 25 in Colony Church.

The word Julotta comes from the Swedish words for “yule” and “before dawn”. Christmas morning in Sweden begins with assistance at the Julotta service. Since 1970, service has been a tradition at Bishop Hill to help reaffirm the Swedish heritage of the community.

Built in 1848 by Swedish immigrants, the public is invited to attend church service in the settlement’s restored church. The liturgy will be led by Rev. Lisa Unger of the Stronghurst and United Methodist churches. Readers include Reverend Bryan Griem of First Baptist Church in Galva and Reverend Dan Wright of First Congregation Church in Toulon. The organist will be Ann Larson, with special music by Courtney Stone. Coffee and rusks, a Swedish pastry similar to biscotti, will be available at the Colony Church Museum after the service.

Welcome Christmas dawn at Colony Church in Bishop Hill

Those planning to attend are encouraged to dress appropriately for the weather, as the shrine will not be heated during the service. Everyone who attends and participates in the service will be required to follow all current CDC and Illinois Department of Public Health guidelines regarding face coverings and social distancing.

The community of Bishop Hill, founded by Swedish immigrants in 1846, is located 20 miles south of Interstate 80 and 17 miles east of Interstate 74 in Henry County. Colony Church is located at 101 Maiden Lane in Bishop Hill.

The Bishop Hill site will be closed on December 25 (except for the Julotta service) and January 1, 2022.

For more information on Bishop Hill and other historic sites in the state, visit www.dnr.illinois.gov.

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Top 10 Jazz Albums of 2021 | Jazz https://iridiumjazz.com/top-10-jazz-albums-of-2021-jazz/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/top-10-jazz-albums-of-2021-jazz/ 10. Emile Parisien / Tim Lefebvre / Christian Lillinger / Michael Wollny – XXXX This international quartet of contemporary jazz mavericks was invited by German virtuoso pianist / composer Michael Wollny to perform four evenings of unheard free jams at the A-Trane club in Berlin and to massage a studio album from the best takes. […]]]>

10. Emile Parisien / Tim Lefebvre / Christian Lillinger / Michael Wollny – XXXX

This international quartet of contemporary jazz mavericks was invited by German virtuoso pianist / composer Michael Wollny to perform four evenings of unheard free jams at the A-Trane club in Berlin and to massage a studio album from the best takes. It is sometimes on horn and jazzy (influence of saxophonist Émile Parisien), explosively abstract, avant-funky or gracefully choral, but there is no cliché within earshot.

Unclassifiable … Ruth Goller

9. Ruth Goller – Skylla

Bassist Ruth Goller has played breathtaking punk jazz, harmonically mysterious Ghanaian ritual music, improvisation and avant-bop, but this unclassifiable adventure, inspired by Greek mythology and aided by singer Lauren Kinsella and Alice Grant, joined the iconoclastic ideas on guitar tuning and intonation (reminiscent of Derek Bailey) to ethereal and multi-layered vocal sounds sometimes reminiscent of Laurie Anderson of the 1980s, for a surprising effect.

8. Anthony Braxton – Quartet (Norms) 2020

Sixty-seven tracks in a gigantic box set recorded live by unique multi-reed virtuoso Anthony Braxton, one of the most prolific, exploratory and open-minded artists in all of jazz. Recorded with a UK touring group including Braxton-listening pianist Alexander Hawkins, it focuses on a courageous forensic reexamination of Broadway standards, jazz classics and popular songs. Read the full review.

7. Tim Berne / Chris Speed ​​/ Dave King / Reid Anderson – Broken Shadows

New York violist Tim Berne is famous for his gnarled originals, but this set of punchy covers with fellow saxophonist Chris Speed ​​and the bass / drums duo Bad Plus of Reid Anderson and Dave King, pays a rousing tribute to the music by Ornette Coleman, Charlie Haden, Dewey Redman and Julius Hemphill. The songs are succinct and memorable, the play fair for the money.

Prodigy… Jihye Lee.
Prodigy … Jihye Lee

6. Jihye Lee Orchestra – The daring spirit

South Korean Jihye Lee was first an indie pop singer and then a jazz prodigy songwriter whose work has been compared to the legendary Gil Evans and Maria Schneider. Daring Mind, a contrasting big band set produced by Darcy James Argue with Lee, shows why in its dizzying sweep from bebop to 21st century rhythm bends and haunting Schneider-style harmonies.

5. Gretchen Parlato – Flor

Its song can be as calm as a sigh or as catchy and melodious as the calls of the most trendy birds. New Yorker Gretchen Parlato is a vocal adventurer, but also a delicately ingenious performer of slippery Brazilian dances and side swing. This wonderful comeback, taking place after a parental break, mixes touching originals and covers by composers from David Bowie to Joao Gilberto and Bach.

4. Shai Maestro – Human

Israeli pianist / composer Shai Maestro, once mentored by famed bassist and composer from this country Avishai Cohen but a rare-character conductor over the past decade, made his best small group recording to date at this session with Lima-born bassist Jorge Roeder, Israeli drummer Ofri Nehemya and brilliant New York trumpeter Philip Dizack – cinematic, eclectic and deeply human music.

3. Charles Lloyd and the Wonders – Tone Poem

The music of Charles Lloyd – an octogenarian reed player from the 1960s John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman but with his own poignant voice – comes in many forms. His country-oriented Marvels band, featuring guitarist Bill Frisell, join songs by Coleman, Leonard Cohen, and the Beach Boys on an ensemble that sounds seductively like a vocal album with no singers. Read the full review.

2. Pat Metheny – Side-Eye NYC (V1.IV)

Guitarist Pat Metheny, one of the most daring updates to contemporary jazz traditions, from freebop to country music and hard rock, chose the classic format of the funky guitar / Hammond organ / drums trio of the 1960s for its Side-Eye project – here with young multi-genre keyboard player James Francies and fiery drummer Marcus Gilmore. This captivating live recording mixes classic Metheny evergreen leaves and new works. Read the full review.

Exciting… Ches Smith.
Exciting… Ches Smith. Photograph: Pacific Press Media Production Corp./Alamy

1. Ches Smith and We All Break – Chemin des sept couleurs

Ches Smith, the New York drummer and composer equally devoted to avant-garde jazz and ancient Haitian-centric voodoo culture and drums and vocals, took on the fascinating challenge of interweaving these threads. The result was this exciting blend of haunting folk vocals, conversational multi-instrumental percussion, and the rhythmically complex jazz genre favored by its frequent conductor, Tim Berne. Read the full review.

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City College students review and recommend a selection of jazz albums – City Times https://iridiumjazz.com/city-college-students-review-and-recommend-a-selection-of-jazz-albums-city-times/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 18:14:10 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/city-college-students-review-and-recommend-a-selection-of-jazz-albums-city-times/ Appreciation of jazz through the ears of City students The cover of the last album released by American jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald features a portrait of the singer known as “First Lady of Song”. Photo from ellafitzgerald.com Each semester, students in Professor Michael Espar’s Jazz History class are tasked with reviewing a jazz outing. We’ve […]]]>

Appreciation of jazz through the ears of City students

The cover of the last album released by American jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald features a portrait of the singer known as “First Lady of Song”. Photo from ellafitzgerald.com

Each semester, students in Professor Michael Espar’s Jazz History class are tasked with reviewing a jazz outing.

We’ve rounded up some of the best reviews from this semester. They range from classic jazz singers like Ella Fitzgerald to the new contemporary jazz sound of Orin Evans.

If you would like to submit a music review or write for the City Times monthly local music playlist, send an email [email protected]

Orin Evans – “The Magic of the Present”

Philadelphia pianist and conductor Orrin Evans explores uncertainty in a society that adapts to social change and a global pandemic. Evans is now imploring communities to open up to rediscover some semblance of normalcy after isolation to experience “The Magic of the Present”.

“Mynah / The Eleventh Hour” is an enthralling piece with a feverish tempo and texture. The perfect contagious rising tension through minor chords embellished by powerful, screaming notes and propelled by rhythmic bass and beat.

“Libra” is conducted by Evans, embellished by Wilkins’ alto saxophone. The dynamic melody sings an opportune moment destined to take away one of their feet.

These tracks, in addition to “MAT-Matt”, present a passionate rhythm and syncopated sounds like avant-garde free jazz, pushing the boundaries of bebop to post-bop.

The regular swing of “Momma Loves” invites you to escape with festive highs emerging from the duo’s interpretations of the initial melody.

The album ends quietly with “Dave”. On the track, the ensemble gently accompanies the contemplative air of Evans, deploying sensations of memory, wonder and quiet farewell.

The energy of the quartet is complex and intimate throughout the album, which gives it an expressive and conversational tone. In a world balancing goodwill and chaos, amid the clamor of uncertainty, Evans provides a glimpse of harmony.

-Kai Kraft

Mynah / The eleventh hour

New Orleans Jazz Orchestra – “Petite Fleur”

“Petite Fleur” is a history of New Orleans jazz and its relationship with France represented through music, courtesy of the musical genius of Grammy-winning jazz drummer Adonis Rose.

“Si Tu Savais”, the third track of the album, presents a solo of notes clarinet that protrudes.

“Get the Bucket” shows the undeniable skills of the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra.

This instrumental begins with a solo saxophone accompanied by the percussion section, to which the rest of the group responds quickly.

The last two songs on the album, “Undecided” and “Down”, are both filled with such energy and punch that it feels like it’s just the beginning of the record. .

The versatility of the album as a whole is wonderful, there is swing, slow tempos, upbeat grooves, beautiful vocals and lots of jaw-dropping solos.

It’s hard to expect less when you hear the name “New Orleans Jazz Orchestra”, but they exceeded my expectations. I really recommend this album to any jazz lover.

– Serena Garrett

Get the bucket

Ella Fitzgerald – “The Lost Tapes of Berlin”

In this compilation of some of Fitzgerald’s greatest works, performed and recorded live in Berlin, in which she sings in front of a roaring and energetic crowd with her resonating, belted vibrato in her vocal prime.

The level of energy she exhibits and the chemistry and swing jazz style of this live recording are unprecedented and totally different from all of her smoother, quieter studio recordings. Heard live, you feel the charm, the improvisational genius, the humor and the spirit of Fitzgerald.

Her live sets interact playfully and seamlessly as her blues and swing tracks switch from tempo, speed and genre to genre, as she addresses the crowd and interacts with them confidently, laughing and telling his songs to his audience live.

She performs several crooning jazz standards such as “Cry Me a River” and “Mack the Knife”, but then seamless transitions from swing to the moving “Someone to Watch Over Me”, in which her magnificent legato vibrato swells in depth. ‘such an emotion. so that the audience could feel that every word was meant for each of us.

In this live compilation, Fitzgerald balances his “Big Band” numbers with slow and sultry Blues numbers. Proving that she truly is the “Lady of Jazz” as she takes you back in time with her to stomp or dream with her deep vocal narration.

– Kim Uecker

Cry Me A River (Live)

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Classical, Jazz and Sound Arts Winners Announced at Ivors Composer Awards https://iridiumjazz.com/classical-jazz-and-sound-arts-winners-announced-at-ivors-composer-awards/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 10:49:42 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/classical-jazz-and-sound-arts-winners-announced-at-ivors-composer-awards/ The Ivors Academy has unveiled the winners of 10 Ivor Novello Awards at the 2021 Ivors Composer Awards, celebrating the music of composers writing for classical, jazz, and sound art. The winners were announced at a ceremony hosted by Tom Service of BBC Radio 3 and Sara Mohr-Pietsch at the British Museum. Recognized as the […]]]>

The Ivors Academy has unveiled the winners of 10 Ivor Novello Awards at the 2021 Ivors Composer Awards, celebrating the music of composers writing for classical, jazz, and sound art. The winners were announced at a ceremony hosted by Tom Service of BBC Radio 3 and Sara Mohr-Pietsch at the British Museum.

Recognized as the pinnacle of their accomplishments since their first performance in 1956, the Ivor Novello Awards celebrate creative excellence in songwriting and songwriting. Six of this year’s ten laureates received an award from the Ivors Academy for the first time, joining a roll call of Ivor laureates which includes Sir Harrison Birtwistle, Judith Weir CBE, Errollyn Wallen CBE, Stan Tracey CBE, Yazz Ahmed, Django Bates and Sir John Rutter.

The Ivors Composer Awards are supported by PRS for Music. BBC Radio 3 will broadcast the ceremony in a special edition of the New Music Show on December 11 at 10 p.m., which will also be available on BBC Sounds.

Julian Joseph OBE, Chairman of the Ivors Academy Awards Committee and Academy Member, said: “Every Ivor Novello awarded tonight ranges from composers and performers to their peers, this is what makes each so distinct and special. I am honored to be a part of recognizing the artistry, imagination and determination that go into creating such wonderful music and soundscapes. The achievements of our winners fill me with joy. admiration and respect and I wish them all my sincere congratulations. “

Andrea Czapary Martin, CEO of PRS for Music, said: “Congratulations to all the winners of this year’s Ivors Composer Awards. The resilience of the classical art, jazz and sound art communities throughout the pandemic has been inspiring, and we look forward to appreciating their remarkable work as part of a live performance when it is safe to do so. I am also proud to say that five of this year’s laureates received the support of our charitable partner, the PRS Foundation. The Ivors Composer Awards highlight the excellence these communities have to offer, and we wish the winners continued success in their careers. “

Alan Davey, Controller of BBC Radio 3 and Classical Music, said: “. times which are still difficult for so many people in the industry. Given the uncertainty for the industry due to yet another coronavirus winter, it is paramount for us at Radio 3 to show our continued support for the impressive songwriting talent – some of them so brilliantly we are sure our Listeners will also rejoice to experience some of the UK‘s most innovative and imaginative new music, once the ceremony proudly airs on our station as part of the New Music Show on Saturday 11 December at 10pm. . “

The winners:

Jazz Composition – Nikki Iles ‘The Caged Bird’

The prize for jazz composition was awarded to Nikki Iles for his work “The Caged Bird”. Written for a jazz group, it was first performed by the Royal Academy Big Band at the Dukes Hall of the Royal Academy of Music. Iles wrote the play at the start of the UK’s foreclosure in 2020 when his work and new collaborations were called off. She explains that “the whole process of writing this piece was the start of my reconnection to my music and it slowly evolved, reflecting my journey through that time”. The Ivors Academy jury for this category called the piece “beautifully designed, balanced and performed”. Large-scale composition – Anna Thorvaldsdottir Novello Award at the ceremony tonight. “CATAMORPHOSIS” was recognized as the best large-scale composition of the year. The work explores the “fragile relationship between humanity and the planet”. The jury judged the piece to be a “wonderfully distinct and carefully organized world of sound”.Created by the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra and Kirill Petrenko, the work can be viewed in the digital concert hall of the Berlin Philharmonic.

Small bedroom composition – Alex Paxton ‘Sometimes Voices’

This year’s youngest winner is Alex Paxton (born 1990) who has been nominated for three works and received the Small Chamber Composition Award for his work “Sometimes Voices”. Written for keyboard and drums, the work was commissioned and premiered by Hyper Duo, a Swiss experimental group made up of pianist Gilles Grimaitre and percussionist Julien Mégroz. ‘Sometimes Voices’ is available here.Solo Composition – Martin Iddon ‘Lampades’ The solo composition award went to Martin Iddon for his work ‘Lampades’. Written for tuba and fixed media, the work has been commissioned and performed by Jack Adler-Mckean and can be watched here.Sound Art – Caroline Kraabel ‘London March 26-28, 2020: Imitation: Inversion’ This year’s Sound Art Award went to UK-based American composer Caroline Kraabel for her work ‘London March 26-28, 2020: Imitation : Inversion ‘. The work was written for double bass with baritone, alto and sopranino saxophones as part of a 40-minute film. The film included shots of the deserted city center of London during the UK’s first COVID lockdown, taken on Kraabel’s phone while she was cycling during her exercise time clearance. To create the work, Kraabel recreated and recorded some of the original sounds from the video clips on his alto saxophone for the “imitated” section, then created opposite sounds for the “inverted” section. zeitgeist of the time “and was” an inventive and humorous translation of real-world sounds to instrumental sounds, revealing connections between the organic and the mechanical. “Vocal or choral composition – Thomas Adès ‘Gyökér (Root)’Thomas Adès’ work “Gyökér (Racine)” received the Ivor Novello Prize for vocal or choral composition. The work was commissioned by Oliver Zeffman as part of his “Eight Songs of Isolation” project, and Zeffman received the award on behalf of Adès tonight because he was unable to attend. The text of the work was taken from the Camp Notebook of Hungarian poet Miklós Radnóti which were his last poems written while imprisoned in a forced labor camp at the end of World War II. The 4-minute piece was recorded by mezzo-soprano Katalin Károlyi and percussionist Ricardo Gallardo. The piece is available to listen to here.

Impact Award – Zoe Rahman

MOBO Award-winning jazz composer and pianist Zoe Rahman received the Impact Award. After studying piano at the Royal Academy of Music, Rahman moved to Boston to study jazz at Berklee College of Music.Throughout her career, she has infused influences from her English, Irish and Bengali heritage to write music with swing, lyricism, energy and intimacy. Her sound is imbued with originality and a jazz legitimacy that recognizes her pedigree as a world-class artist, composer and performer. The Ivors Academy has described Rahman as “one of Britain’s most powerful compositional voices and important contemporary artists who shines the spotlight on UK jazz as an international musical force.”

Innovation Award – Cleveland Watkiss MBE

This year’s innovation award celebrated a pioneer in the world of sound; singer and songwriter Cleveland Watkiss. Boasting an eclectic roster of collaborators from Björk, Talvin Singh, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, the London Community Gospel Choir and The Who, Watkiss has been described by the Ivors Academy as “unique in the world and in annuals of British jazz and contemporary music, unclassifiable. ”An innovative musician sensitive to the conditions that allow creative improvisation to flourish, Watkiss inspired and was co-founder of the big band Jazz Warriors.

Collection of exceptional works – Alexander Goehr

The Ivor Novello Prize for Outstanding Works Collection went to Alexander Goehr, recognizing his achievements over a career spanning seven decades. During his stay at the University of Cambridge, Goehr has been a constant force for innovation and discourse in contemporary classical music. and chamber, opera and symphonic “.

Visionary Award – Sarah Angliss

The Visionary Award celebrated the multi-faceted creative technologist and songwriter Sarah Angliss. Classically trained, specializing in Baroque and Renaissance music, Angliss also studied electroacoustic engineering and robotics, and both sides of his education inform his art. his own robotic polyphonic chime, The Ivors Academy, said that Angliss “stays true to its artistic concepts, to create unique compositions that connect to the listener with emotional depth and great beauty, never failing to leave a mark. lasting impression “. Her inventive approach led her to be in high demand for live performances and soundtrack appearance.Classical, Jazz and Sound Arts Winners Announced at Ivors Composer Awards

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We Jazz brings hot jazz to Freezin´ Finland https://iridiumjazz.com/we-jazz-brings-hot-jazz-to-freezin-finland/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 16:08:47 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/we-jazz-brings-hot-jazz-to-freezin-finland/ This place is cool. Not that big, but not super small either. First you have to go up a flight of stairs and then you are in the middle of the cozy bar. To the left is the stage and in front of it, separated from the bar by a wall, is a space for […]]]>

This place is cool. Not that big, but not super small either. First you have to go up a flight of stairs and then you are in the middle of the cozy bar. To the left is the stage and in front of it, separated from the bar by a wall, is a space for those who really want to hear the concert that is already playing. the Ilmiliekki Quartet plays, an illustrious quartet with some of the most exciting names in the young Finnish jazz scene. Verneri Pohjola (top photo), for example, plays the trumpet, and that night he always plays it a little cloudy, with a melancholy undertone. Just as the sound of this group only sometimes rises and seeks its way to brilliance and daring. The bass is played by Antti Lötjönen Quintet East, a combo with three wind instrumentalists, including the two saxophonists Jonas Kullhammar and Jussi kannaste and of course trumpeter Verneri Pohjola. This quintet relies heavily on improvised communication between them, which can however become a bit tiring during a concert.

To access the Lötjönen group hall and the other acts of the evening, you need to familiarize yourself a little with Helsinki. The venues for We Jazz are spread all over the city anyway; every night he goes somewhere different. This has been part of the concept since 2013, the year of the first edition of the festival. Young saxophonist Linda fredriksson (above – photo of Maarit Kytöharju) presents for example his first solo album Juniper (on We Jazz Records, by the way) on the second floor of an interesting store in the middle of the shopping street in central Helsinki. During performances in a rather simple room called Mittarikorjaamo, you have to take off your shoes each time. Why, in fact, none of the visitors know. And some of them don’t like to do it either, because a little snow is already falling outside. So you are happy when your feet are warm and stay warm. But it’s worth taking your shoes off for some very melodic, timelessly beautiful jazz from the Finnish pianist quartet Riitta Paakki, with, you guessed it, Antti Lötjönen play bass. Warm music.

This year, festival organizer Matti Nives and his dedicated team will also be bringing jazz to life in a funk and techno club a bit far from central Helsinki. The building has two rooms, and you can walk from one to the other if you don’t like something. With the Joona toivanen Trio, however, it is worth dwelling on, as the pianist and his two companions in arms on bass and drums create a palette of multi-colored sounds from engaging melodies and moments, which they expand and repeatedly color with sound treatments in an exciting way. Their brilliant new album The two only will be released next February on We Jazz Records.

The electroacoustic quartet Y-Otis by the Swedish saxophonist based in Berlin Otis sandsjö, on the other hand, offers exactly the music you need at midnight. Loud, modern and slightly modified sounds, with hip-hop grooves and shimmering saxophone lines, perfect for nodding and rocking. Jazz club which rightly creates a lot of enthusiasm in the public.

But not only music, with a very gratifying emphasis on the Finnish national jazz scene, was in the rich program of the festival. At a round table, for example, the artistic director of Jazzfest Berlin, Nadin deventer, spoke of courageous programming. And the American writer Ashley kahn illuminated John Coltrane’s masterpiece Supreme love down to the smallest detail, offering a fascinating glimpse into the making of this century album by the unforgettable jazz legend.

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