France – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 23:44:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png France – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 Meskerem Mees, winner of the Montreux Jazz Talent Award 2021 at Tadias magazine https://iridiumjazz.com/meskerem-mees-winner-of-the-montreux-jazz-talent-award-2021-at-tadias-magazine/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 23:44:14 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/meskerem-mees-winner-of-the-montreux-jazz-talent-award-2021-at-tadias-magazine/ The Belgian singer-songwriter of Ethiopian origin Meskerem Mees is the winner of the Montreux Jazz Talent Award 2021. According to the organizers, the promising musician was “unanimously elected by a jury composed of both professional judges and members of the public “. (Montreux Jazz Festival) Press release Montreux Jazz Festival The Montreux Jazz Talent Award […]]]>

The Belgian singer-songwriter of Ethiopian origin Meskerem Mees is the winner of the Montreux Jazz Talent Award 2021. According to the organizers, the promising musician was “unanimously elected by a jury composed of both professional judges and members of the public “. (Montreux Jazz Festival)

Press release

Montreux Jazz Festival

The Montreux Jazz Talent Award 2021 was awarded to Belgian singer and songwriter Meskerem Mees. The 21-year-old artist performed at the Montreux Jazz Festival alongside eight other emerging talents selected by the Montreux Jazz Artists Foundation. Meskerem Mees was unanimously elected by a jury composed of both professional judges and members of the public, as well as a committee of artists including Yaron Herman, Anne Paceo, Shabaka Hutchings and Michael League.

The Montreux Jazz Artists Foundation (MJAF) has invited eight artists to perform at the Montreux Jazz Talent Awards, from July 2 to 17, 2021. Each candidate has been carefully selected by the booking team for their various interpretations of jazz and music drunk.

The eight artists performed at the 55th edition of the Montreux Jazz Festival in front of a jury made up of professional judges and members of the public. Four musicians, who work closely with the MJAF, also participated in the vote: Yaron Herman, Anne Paceo, Shabaka Hutchings (Sons of Kemet) and Michael League (Snarky Puppy).

THE VOTE FOR MESKEREM MEES WAS UNANIMOUSLY

Beautifully composed tunes, a magnetic presence and a distinct velvet voice: Meskereem Mees was a real eye-opener in the competition, impressing all three juries. The 21-year-old Flemish musician says she is inspired by artists such as Joni Mitchell, Nina Simone and Courtney Barnett. After releasing a handful of singles including the stunning “Joe”, Meskerem Mees is set to release their highly anticipated debut album, Julius, on November 12, 2021.

“I feel very honored to be the winner of a talent prize competition organized by such a renowned festival as the Montreux Jazz Festival. I can’t wait to learn from some of the best musicians in the world at Montreux Jazz Academy. Thank you all, once again, for this incredible opportunity.

– Meskerem Mees

PRICES AND PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT

Meskerem Mees obtained a one-week artistic residency at La Becque on the shores of Lake Geneva. She will also perform at the Montreux Jazz Academy under the musical direction of Shabaka Hutchings, Edward Wakili-Hick and Alexander Hawkins. The 7th edition of the Montreux Jazz Academy will take place at the Autumn of Music festival, organized by the Montreux Jazz Artists Foundation from October 27 to 30, 2021.

At a key point in their career, they also benefit from long-term professional support from the Montreux Jazz Artists Foundation (MJAF) and the Festival’s large network of contacts. The MJAF regularly participates in the programming of concerts in Switzerland and abroad, for example in Swiss cultural centers in Paris and Rome.

Join the conversation on Twitter and Facebook.

]]>
Duo kick launch a jazz band https://iridiumjazz.com/duo-kick-launch-a-jazz-band/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 01:30:26 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/duo-kick-launch-a-jazz-band/ NEW JAZZ SOUND: Shylie Harrison and Laura Small have launched a new jazz sound here in Mount Gambier. THE sound of jazz will return to the Limestone Coast pantry next month with the first performance of The Corner Big Band. After getting tired of waiting for opportunities to hone their musical art amid the Covid-19 […]]]>

NEW JAZZ SOUND: Shylie Harrison and Laura Small have launched a new jazz sound here in Mount Gambier.

THE sound of jazz will return to the Limestone Coast pantry next month with the first performance of The Corner Big Band.

After getting tired of waiting for opportunities to hone their musical art amid the Covid-19 pandemic, Laura Small and Shylie Harrison incubated the idea of ​​starting a big band.

After 18 months of planning, modeling, budgeting and more, the duo decided on one season per year with two terms.

There are expected to be 17 musicians and three live events hosted by the band each season.

Junior players will also have the opportunity to audition to join the group in season two and sit alongside Mount Gambier’s top musicians in a mentorship program.

This program would allow participants to eventually register for a position at Générations en Jazz in 2024.

“We wanted to create a model that saw our players go from ‘pay to play’ to ‘play to pay,’ Ms. Harrison said.

“It was so important to us because the arts industry has been decimated and continues to be severely affected by the Covid 19 pandemic.”

Ms Small said the band’s name was influenced by the style of music the duo wanted to play.

Corner Pocket was recorded by Count Basie in 1955 on his album April in Paris and was subsequently

turned into a vocal by Manhattan Transfer, ”Ms. Small said.

“We thought it would be the perfect opening for our concerts and we thought why not use it as a name too.

“We want to take audiences back to the swing roots of the 1920s and 1950s, to relive or revitalize the love of classical jazz composers of the time, from Basie to Nestico, Thad Jones, Duke Ellington to name a few. -a. “

She said they wanted to keep the same passion and interest in jazz music at Mount Gambier after James Morrison Academy took on a new direction.

The first event will take place at the Limestone Coast Pantry on December 11 with tickets available from humantix

]]>
A new Franco-Maltese jazz album released this month https://iridiumjazz.com/a-new-franco-maltese-jazz-album-released-this-month/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 11:01:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/a-new-franco-maltese-jazz-album-released-this-month/ Maltese saxophonist’s fifth album Carlo Muscat entitled The diversity is a tribute to the music of black American artists and the lasting and profound impacts of their contributions to the genre. Recorded in Paris in 2020 with a selection of some of the city’s most prominent jazz musicians, the album covers a variety of works […]]]>

Maltese saxophonist’s fifth album Carlo Muscat entitled The diversity is a tribute to the music of black American artists and the lasting and profound impacts of their contributions to the genre. Recorded in Paris in 2020 with a selection of some of the city’s most prominent jazz musicians, the album covers a variety of works by Wayne Shorter, Horace Silver and Joe Henderson, among others.

Saxophonist Carlo Muscat has built an impressive and respected career on the island, both as a performer and as a promoter of live events through his music room Storeroom at Ta ‘Xbiex.

After a brief flirtation with the violin at the age of eight, a few years later, Muscat switched to the tenor saxophone, embarking him on a journey of personal and creative development that would eventually lead him to Paris in 2013 to continue his studies in jazz – a city he revisited last year for the recording of The diversity.

He describes his musical journey as “an incessant, expressive process allowing freedom of interpretation”. This latest album sums it up perfectly, displaying a strongly individual character while remaining true to the spirit and musical language of the original material.

The opening track of the disc, Six and four by Oliver Nelson, demonstrates a playful character that oscillates between different key centers in surprising but navigable ways, and is a fitting choice to open the album.

After establishing the main melodic material of the piece, the track gives way to a cheerful Muscat solo that clearly communicates his affection and deep knowledge of the genre, featuring flowing swing lines, a strong sense of character and harmonic changes. effortlessly.

This is followed by a rhythmically inventive double bass solo from Mauro Gargano which communicates strongly with the accompaniment of drummer Philippe Maniez who, in particular, creatively uses cymbals to both support the bass while still giving it ample space. space at the bottom of the mix.

The set then goes to After the rain by jazz legend John Coltrane, a track that effectively uses guitar and tenor saxophone playing in unison, but with some individual freedom – an approach that creates an interesting phasing-like sound effect.

Jinrikisha, the third track from Joe Henderson’s record features saxophone and guitar solos, this first solo offering from Simon Martineau on the album demonstrating the guitarist’s thoughtful approach to improvisation clearly built on years of experience and talent. harmonic exploration.

Its timbre fits perfectly into the sound world of the album, providing tonal clarity and a pleasant, well-balanced melodic voice. I especially enjoyed his sparse use of chords at the end of the solo, which help create a sense of urgency when the melody returns to the tenor.

The fourth track, Too early, a piece by one of the genre’s most recognizable and influential names, Duke Ellington, perfectly demonstrates the thematic creativity and unique voice for which the composer is known and loved, and opens with an inventive solo à la guitar that strongly uses melodic counterpoint and harmonic ideas in the different registers of the instrument.

A well chosen track for the album and which holds its place as the fifth track, To go for a walk (Horace Silver) presents a very pleasant and idiomatic melody, his singing character perfectly staged both in the main motif and in the later solos of Muscat and Martineau. Mahjong by Wayne Shorter follows – an offer that turns out to be a very nice deal.

The voicings chosen by Martineau in combination with excellent rhythmic work of support on bass and drums, in addition to the rich and melatic sound of Muscat throughout the repeated descending melody, bring to life the bright-eyed but relaxed character of the room.

The penultimate track on the album Hot Waltz (Sonny Rollins) begins with an angular discussion game between saxophone, guitar and bass. The piece includes a short but pleasant bass solo, giving Gargano space to step out of the mix with flourishing melodic fragments. The piece slows down rapidly to a satisfactory conclusion, led by the breathless descent of the saxophone into the low register of the instrument.

Closing the album, the exciting What I dig out of you by Hank Mobley features an upbeat main melody, leading to an equally fluid and energetic tenor saxophone solo. This work also provides a platform for Philippe Maniez solo, giving him the freedom to open up in a way that has so far only been suggested on the album.

What struck me was Maniez’s clearly melodic approach to solo, his very engaging use of drums creating defined descending pitch tracks punctuated by snare and cymbals. This track is a perfect choice to close the album, its “direct” jazz side, delivering a satisfying cadence to the album and leaving me eager to know more about this excellent quartet.

In conclusion, I really enjoyed this album, the choices of material included and the strongly idiomatic approach to the instrumental work creating the impression of a remastered – although in reality reinvented – album from a golden age of jazz.

Muscat and his fellow musicians should be applauded for creating a record which, while clearly respecting the genre and contributions of the jazz giants to whom he pays homage, nonetheless manages to carve out a unique sound for themselves.

The choice of songs on the album represents a wise and imaginative approach to programming, offering listeners an eclectic but focused body of work. I have no hesitation in recommending this album and look forward to the band’s next appearance here in Malta.

The album The diversity is now available on all streaming platforms and can be purchased on Bandcamp.com. For more information, visit www.carlomuscat.com.

Independent journalism costs money. Times of Malta support for the price of a coffee.

Support us

]]>
Suncoast Jazz Festival brings professional jazz artists and budding young musicians together in Clearwater | Diversions https://iridiumjazz.com/suncoast-jazz-festival-brings-professional-jazz-artists-and-budding-young-musicians-together-in-clearwater-diversions/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 16:10:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/suncoast-jazz-festival-brings-professional-jazz-artists-and-budding-young-musicians-together-in-clearwater-diversions/ CLEARWATER – The 31st annual Suncoast Jazz Festival is just around the corner, and organizers are once again busy preparing to entertain attendees with a mix of indoor musical performances and sun and outdoor fun. The three-day celebration will run Friday through Sunday, November 19-21, and will take place at five indoor venues at the […]]]>

CLEARWATER – The 31st annual Suncoast Jazz Festival is just around the corner, and organizers are once again busy preparing to entertain attendees with a mix of indoor musical performances and sun and outdoor fun.

The three-day celebration will run Friday through Sunday, November 19-21, and will take place at five indoor venues at the Sheraton Sand Key, 1160 Gulf Blvd., Clearwater Beach; and Marriott Suites Sand Key, 1201 Gulf Blvd., Clearwater Beach.

The festival will feature some of the best professional traditional jazz musicians from across the United States as well as budding young musicians from the community. The performances rotate hourly throughout the day and night on the various stages and ballrooms of the hotels. Daily tickets range from $ 50 to $ 55. Three-day tickets cost $ 198. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.suncoastjazzclassic.com or call 727-248-9441.

This year’s lineup will feature over 20 guest groups and artists from the Tampa Bay area and across the United States. Festival bands will play traditional jazz, big band, swing, zydeco, banjo, rockabilly and more. The lineup will include performances by a number of newcomers to the festival such as the Brubeck Brothers Quartet, Diego Figueiredo and the Ed Metz Trio with Rossano Sportiello and Nicki Parrott. Returning favorites include Jason Marsalis, Professor Cunningham & His Old School, Dave Bennett Quartet, Cornet Chop Suey, Tom Rigney & Flambeau, Heather Thorn and Vivacity, Jim Gover’s Dixieland Jam Sessions, La Lucha, Dick Hyman, Nate Najar and Daniela Soledad.

A few groups of young musicians from the region will also perform at the festival. Among those expected to take the stage are the Tarpon Springs High School Jazz Ensemble and the Ruth Eckerd Youth Jazz Band.

The Brubeck Brothers Quartet

Chris and Dan Brubeck have been making music together most of their lives. Drummer Dan and bassist, trombonist and songwriter Chris recorded their first album together in 1966, over half a century ago. They went on to play a variety of styles in a number of different groups, as well as with their father, jazz giant Dave Brubeck, and with their own Brubeck Brothers Quartet. With Dan and Chris as the foundation, guitarist Mike DeMicco and pianist Chuck Lamb complete this dynamic quartet.

The Brubeck Brothers Quartet has performed in concert series, college and jazz festivals across North America and Europe, including the Newport, Detroit, Montreal, Playboy / Hollywood Bowl and Monterey Jazz Festivals. Their latest CD, “TimeLine,” celebrated Dave Brubeck’s famous State Department tour in 1958. The CD was released widely in major jazz markets across America and was a hit on the radio charts of Jazz Week for five months.






Diego Figueiredo




Diego Figueiredo

Diego Figueiredo is today considered one of the most talented guitarists in the world. Winner of the Montreux Jazz Competition and the VISA Prize, Figueiredo has published to date more than 20 albums, three DVDs and several educational books. His music is a fusion of jazz, bossa nova and classical.

Figueiredo’s unique interpretations, along with his phenomenal technique and emotion, created an explosion of adoring fans and spectators. To date, Figueiredo has performed in over 40 countries around the world.






d-BEACHES-suncoastjazz111821-3-Jason Marsalis_HiRes.jpg

Jason marsalis




Jason marsalis

Jason Marsalis made his festival debut at the Suncoast Jazz Festival in 2019.

According to MM Music Agency, Marsalis’s musical abilities became evident from an early age. Son of pianist and music teacher Ellis Marsalis and his wife Dolores, and the younger brother of Wynton, Branford and Delfeayo, he is well known for his extreme drumming. He studied percussion at Loyola University in New Orleans and worked as a sideman in traditional jazz, funk and jazz fusion groups. He works with his father’s band, as well as pianist Marcus Roberts, while honing his playing in two of modern jazz’s most demanding trios.

In 2013, Marsalis released “In a World of Mallets” on Basin Street Records, displaying his expertise on vibraphones. That same year, he was recognized as the 2013 Rising Star in Downbeat Magazine’s annual Critics’ Poll. “In a World of Mallets” features his original music, songs from his band mates, and more. Marsalis also plays marimba, glockenspiel, tubular bells, vibraphone and xylophone on the album as he develops his “discipline” overdubs of recent years.

Drawing on a wide range of influences, Marsalis performs original music as well as many hidden gems from jazz literature and beyond. He has the gift of selecting compositions that cover a wide range of atmospheres, rhythms and emotions.

His most recent release on Basin Street Records with his 21st Century Trad Band is “Melody Reimagined: book 1”, the first in a series exploring the possibilities of creating new compositions based on the chord progressions of existing compositions.

Visit jasonmarsalis.com.






d-BEACHES-suncoastjazz111821-6-natenajar.tiff

Nate najar


Nate najar

Nate Najar of the Tampa Bay area is returning to the festival this year.

Najar is an American guitarist, music producer and songwriter who performs primarily as a fingerstyle guitarist playing classical guitar. He released a follow-up to his acclaimed 2016 album “This Is Nate Najar”. On “Under Paris Skies”, his 2018 album, Najar explores his passion for French jazz and pop with a deeper commitment and purpose than ever before. The 11-track collection extends Najar’s creative relationship with Woodward Avenue Records, which released their “Christmas in December” in 2017. Najar’s affiliation with the famous jazz label dates back to “Groove Me,” his collaboration in 2010 with Melba Moore who reached the top 10 of the Billboard Jazz charts.

His art evokes a modern and progressive attitude that continues the legacy of the great Charlie Byrd. Visit www.natenajar.com.






d-BEACHES-suncoastjazz111821-4-danielle.tiff

Daniela Soledade


Daniela Soledade

Najar will perform several times throughout the three days of the festival on different stages with other guest musicians. Among those who share the stage with him is Daniela Soledade.

Soledade may initially seem like a new name in Brazilian music, but the singer’s impact immediately strikes a chord as seen on her bold and subtle debut album of 2019, “A Moment of You”. Released by Blue Line Music Records, this carefully curated set of bossa nova gems manages to dodge the more obvious choices and add Brazilian standards and original songs. The album was created in partnership with Najar as producer / guitarist. The collaboration frames the bright tone and mature interpretive powers of this talented singer, singing in both English and Portuguese.

Soledade’s story adds depth to his ongoing musical career. She is linked to a line of great Brazilian artists, ranging from her grandfather Paulo – collaborator of Antonio Carlos Jobim, Vinícius de Moraes, Baden Powell and other Brazilian legends – and her father Paulinho, who worked as a producer and partner with Ivan Lins and Gilberto Gil.

Growing up, she spent time in the best studios in Rio de Janeiro, observing and playing with her father. She studied transverse flute at the Villa Lobos Conservatory of Music in Rio at the age of 14 and continued her music after moving to Florida at age 16.

Soledade is now ready for her moment on the larger music scene.

“I couldn’t be happier with this project,” Soledade said of “A Moment of You” in a press release. “I love having my grandfather’s and my dad’s songs with one of my own. I love the intimate, delicate and rich sound of the recordings. I love the fact that all the musicians who play there are amazing world class musicians. The atmosphere, the feeling, the two languages ​​combined, the authentic Brazilian rhythms with which I grew up… everything is perfect for me. I couldn’t think of a better album to take me to the next stage in my musical life.

Visit danielasoledade.com.

History of festivals

For 30 years, event planners have worked diligently behind the scenes to present the annual Suncoast Jazz Festival, an event committed to the preservation and promotion of jazz – the only true American art form.

Over the years, the festival has grown into a unique celebration of jazz, providing opportunities for professional musicians from across North America as well as aspiring young musicians in the Tampa Bay area to perform and share their music with a passionate and very grateful audience in Eau Claire.

With an abundance of individual sponsors as well as festival attendees, Suncoast Classic Jazz Inc. can continue to serve the local community. Each year, the organization provides financial assistance to both individual young musicians as well as to local groups and schools – to the tune of nearly $ 100,000 over the years.

COVID-19 Safety Information

We all know what happened last year: The COVID-19 pandemic has curtailed all kinds of artistic and entertainment traditions, suspending concerts and festivals indefinitely.

For the Suncoast Jazz Festival, that meant event planners had to think outside the box if they wanted to carry on the tradition in one form or another. Thanks to ingenious planning, COVID-19 didn’t have the last word … or musical note: Event planners presented a virtual version of the Suncoast Jazz Festival last year, with musical performances broadcast live on Facebook , YouTube and on suncoastjazzfestival.com.

While this year’s festival will see a welcome return to in-person concerts, COVID-19 continues to reshape the way spectators and event planners handle indoor social gatherings. On the festival site, Joan Dragon, director of the Suncoast Jazz Festival, explains the COVID-19 protocols that will be implemented during this year’s festival.

According to Dragon, each participant will be required to provide either proof of vaccination or negative results from a COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of showing at the festival. The festival organizers will strongly recommend that all participants wear a mask in public areas at all times during the festival, except when eating and drinking.

Dragon goes on to say that event organizers will continue to monitor the pandemic situation, which is constantly evolving, and reserve the right to change site protocols at any time.

For complete information on the festival’s COVID-19 safety information, visit www.suncoastjazzfestival.com/covid-19-safety-information/.

For more details on the festival, including a performance program, visit www.suncoastjazzfestival.com.

]]>
the iconic jazz star who challenged the Nazis https://iridiumjazz.com/the-iconic-jazz-star-who-challenged-the-nazis/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-iconic-jazz-star-who-challenged-the-nazis/ In 1963, Josephine Baker found herself standing in front of 250,000 people, dressed in a French military uniform encrusted with medals, about to deliver a speech in front of no less than Martin Luther King. Throughout his life, Baker has grown from a housekeeper forced to sleep in the basement to toast in Paris, to […]]]>

In 1963, Josephine Baker found herself standing in front of 250,000 people, dressed in a French military uniform encrusted with medals, about to deliver a speech in front of no less than Martin Luther King. Throughout his life, Baker has grown from a housekeeper forced to sleep in the basement to toast in Paris, to a decorated war hero and a leading voice in the fight against racial inequality. So where did it all start?

Even as a child, Josephine Baker defied borders. She was born in 1906 in St. Louis, Missouri. However, she grew up in East St. Louis, which is actually within the neighboring state of Illinois. Her mother was an incredibly ambitious woman who dreamed of becoming a successful music hall dancer. Indeed, it was while traveling in the isolated Midwest as a dancer that she met the man Josephine would have come to think of as her father. Much of her youth was reportedly spent watching at the edge of a stage, surrounded by spectators, all of whom had paid to watch her mother dance. But it was not. None of her parents’ careers took off, and by the age of eight, Josephine was working in local homes to keep her family afloat. Eventually, she became a maid for one of the wealthy white families in her neighborhood, who forced her to sleep in the basement with the dogs. For Josephine, this uneasiness was only mitigated by her love of animals. In addition to the dogs, she took care of the family’s chickens, continuing to keep one particular hen as a pet. For months she loved it, until one day she was handed a rusty wooden ax and told to kill the chicken and pluck its feathers for roasting.

Leaving this special family, Josephine and was forced to make do with the money she earned dancing in the streets. She always had a passion for dancing and put on shows for her parents growing up. But as Josephine grew older, her mother made it clear her opinion about this seemingly uncontrollable passion. Having spent a life in the cabaret circuit herself, she tried to dissuade Josephine from continuing to dance professionally. However, at the age of 15, one of Josephine’s street routines caught the attention of a traveling theater company, The Jones Family Band, whom she decided to join on the road to New York. . She didn’t hesitate, not even once. What she left behind – her family, her home – had already been destroyed, along with the rest of her neighborhood after days of riots.

Upon arriving in New York City, Baker was forced to lie about her age in order to join the choir line for the traveling show. Mix along after that, The Black Dandies, which were some of the earliest black shows on Broadway. Around this time, Baker was praised for her unique routines, which saw her fake an awkward routine to embark on very syncopated stages that drove the crowd crazy. She has become a remarkable performer, showing off the other girls in the choir, much to their chagrin. Theater audiences had never seen someone like Baker before. To many at the time, she was both terrifying and lovely, a woman with intense sexual appeal who seemed like she could eat you whole at any moment.

(Credit: Alamy)

Then, in 1925, Baker crossed the Atlantic to Paris, where she danced with The Negro Review, a review produced by a wealthy American socialite whose goal was to introduce the Parisian public to jazz, a new form of dance music that had emerged during the Harlem Renaissance. At that time in Paris, there was an obsession with black art and culture, born out of a European colonial mindset. While this may seem deeply problematic from a modern perspective, for Baker this exoticism was at least preferable to the rampant and often violent racism she had faced in the United States.

Baker quickly became a sensation across France, having created the “Danse Sauvage”, a half-tone routine in which she wore a thong adorned with a banana dress. Then, in 1930, she turned away from a singing career, releasing several incredibly successful movies and songs, including her biggest hit “J’ai Deux Amours” in 1931. It’s hard to say how good Baker is. was famous at that time. Not only was she the highest-paid artist in Paris (spending most of her money on a menagerie of diamond-collared animals around the world), but she was also considered such a powerful figure of beauty as Parisians white people started buying almond oil to darken their skin.

However, in 1939 everything changed. The German occupation of France ended her flourishing career in film and music, prompting her to join the French resistance in the early 1940s. Some say she was trained to shoot in the sewers under Paris, which were surely far from the lavish lodges she had once called home. Using her diva status to infiltrate the Nazi Party, she traveled to Europe to target diplomats and military officials, briefing her confidants in Paris by writing messages in invisible ink on sheet music. After the liberation of France, Baker received the Croix de Guerre and the Legion of Honor, the highest national honor.

After the war, Baker decided to return to the United States, where she used her fame to draw attention to the racial inequality that forced her to leave all those years ago. Upon her return, she refused to play separate shows. Indeed, these laws meant that Baker herself – who was nothing short of a war hero – had been denied entry to several locations. While dining with a group of friends at the Stalk Club in 1951, for example, Baker noticed that while the establishment’s white diners were still being served, service at his table had completely stopped. Baker made two important phone calls: one to his lawyer and the other to the police chief. As you might expect, service quickly resumed, but it was a bit too late. Baker picketed the Stalk Club, leading a boycott that caught the attention of the newspapers, which led to her being accused of communism and prompted the FBI to put her on her watch list. For more than a decade, Baker was the victim of censorship, which meant that she couldn’t make a living in the United States and was forced to return to France.

Throughout the 1950s, Baker lived on her property in southwestern France, where she spent much of her time adopting babies from all over the world in what she described as “an experience of fraternity”. The “Rainbow Tribe” consisted of 12 adopted children who, to them, heralded a sort of post-racial utopia. Then, in the 1960s, Josephine Baker was invited to return to the United States for another key moment in world history, the March on Washington. She was one of only two women invited to lead the march and was the only woman invited to speak. And so Baker, whom white American society had continually avoided, now stood in front of thousands of people, dressed in his French military uniform, on the verge of changing the world once again.

Follow Far Out Magazine on our social networks, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

]]>
A live version of the best Coltrane jazz album emerges https://iridiumjazz.com/a-live-version-of-the-best-coltrane-jazz-album-emerges/ https://iridiumjazz.com/a-live-version-of-the-best-coltrane-jazz-album-emerges/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 03:30:59 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/a-live-version-of-the-best-coltrane-jazz-album-emerges/ Much like many listeners who tried to immerse themselves in jazz from a musical experience deeply rooted in classic rock and rock’n’roll of the 1960s and 1970s, my introductory albums to the genre were Miles Davis. Kind of blue and that of John Coltrane Supreme love. I was in my late teens or early twenties. […]]]>

Much like many listeners who tried to immerse themselves in jazz from a musical experience deeply rooted in classic rock and rock’n’roll of the 1960s and 1970s, my introductory albums to the genre were Miles Davis. Kind of blue and that of John Coltrane Supreme love. I was in my late teens or early twenties.

Last month, the release of a phenomenal live version of Supreme love, a reinterpretation recorded in October 1965, transported me once again to this time. Davis’ 1959 album is kind of an easy way to dive into jazz. Ironic, because over the course of his nearly 50-year career, Davis has traveled, mostly brilliantly, from style to style, reinventing himself so much that his influence on jazz as well as other genres has remained limitless. . Kind of blue is an album of a different kind. Even if you are unfamiliar with jazz, it can convert you.

Read also: Ajitpal Singh, from Sundance to Jalandhar

This is the kind of album where the tunes quickly become familiar and soon you can recognize the song every time it is played. The tone is set from the very first bass line of the opening song, followed by piano and horn. It helps that it’s a bunch of geniuses: Davis is on trumpet, sure, but there’s Cannonball Adderley on alto sax, Coltrane on tenor sax, Paul Chambers on double bass, Jimmy Cobb on drums, and Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly at the piano. No one tries to outshine others. And it is a well documented fact that Davis did not go to rehearse before a recording. He played harmonic sketches for the members of his group, who would improvise on them during the recording.

Kind of blue is found on many prestigious lists of great albums of all time; many critics even see it as perhaps the best jazz album of all time, although there may be another candidate for the job: Coltrane’s. Supreme love. Protected from Davis, Coltrane, recognized as one of the best jazz saxophonists, had a short but tumultuous career. He was part of Davis’ group but was previously sacked by the great trumpeter, possibly because he showed up drunk and disheveled for a gig.

Coltrane died prematurely at age 40, in 1967. But in recent years he has recorded albums that have established him as one of the greatest saxophonists and conductors in jazz. The highlight of his career is Supreme love. Recorded in 1965, it featured the classical Coltrane quartet, consisting of Jimmy Garrison on bass, Elvin Jones on drums and percussion, and McCoy Tyner on piano. The album, revered by musicians and listeners, marks an epiphanic moment in Coltrane’s life when he gives up alcohol and drugs and embraces spiritualism.

It is a suite of four arias. The first one, Acknowledgement, presents Coltrane chanting the phrase “Supreme love», Giving the album its name and setting the tone for a deeply immersive and calming composition that can transport the listener to a deeply spiritual state. While Kind of blue and Supreme love are both recognized as brilliant albums, the former is often cited as a definitive jazz album where Davis creates a form known as modal jazz: no chord changes, as in the previous bop form of jazz, but a style where there is a single tonal or center harmonic from which each player improvises.

Read also: When fiction collides with fake news

It’s a calming album that has become over time – at least for me – something that I can play even in the background. Supreme love is different. If it also belongs to the category “modal jazz”, it is deeply hymnal. And it is a break with the previous works of Coltrane which were marked by a style of play more aggressive, even violent. Its four pieces have a single central key, the improvisations, in particular by the saxophone of Coltrane (which always has an astonishing vocal quality), take the listeners on a whole different kind of journey where the harmony and the melody evolve towards a hint of free jazz adventurism— enough to always appeal to the listener.

Oddly enough, Coltrane didn’t often perform the tunes of the album live. There was a recording of Paris but not much else. Until last month, when Supreme Love: Living in Seattle, a surprising reinterpretation recorded in Seattle, USA, over half a century ago, has been released.

In addition to the classical quartet, it includes a (then) 24-year-old Pharoah Sanders on tenor saxophone, Carlos Ward on alto saxophone and an additional bassist, Donald Garrett. The original Supreme love lasted about 32 minutes. The Living in Seattle version is a glorious 75 minutes, with eight tracks instead of four.

The real difference is in the music. The first track, Acknowledgement, is 22 minutes long (the original was less than eight) and begins with two basslines before slowly developing into the familiar melody, preceded by numerous tangential improvisations. And that also goes for the rest of the songs. The album marks Coltrane’s relentless urge to step out of familiar ground and move towards freer jazz formats, a fulcrum that sets the stage for his subsequent albums and performances. Unfortunately, there weren’t too many to come – he died two years later.

Listening to the Seattle recording can be a much appreciated return to the spiritual character of the original. Supreme love, interpreted in a looser and quite pleasantly improvised way.

The list of trade fairs

First Beat is a column on what’s new and groovy in the world of music.

@sanjoynarayan

Also read: Todd Haynes Notes on the Subway

]]>
https://iridiumjazz.com/a-live-version-of-the-best-coltrane-jazz-album-emerges/feed/ 0
The icon of the Mont Airy jazz club, Marine, pioneer, dies at 98 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-icon-of-the-mont-airy-jazz-club-marine-pioneer-dies-at-98/ https://iridiumjazz.com/the-icon-of-the-mont-airy-jazz-club-marine-pioneer-dies-at-98/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-icon-of-the-mont-airy-jazz-club-marine-pioneer-dies-at-98/ by Len Lear Benjamin L. Bynum Sr., longtime Mount Airy resident, who brought countless bold names to his North Philly jazz club, the Cadillac Club, from 1965 to 1977, and whose sons helped run a series of restaurants and concert halls in Philly, including two in Chestnut Hill, for more than three decades, died of […]]]>

by Len Lear

Benjamin L. Bynum Sr., longtime Mount Airy resident, who brought countless bold names to his North Philly jazz club, the Cadillac Club, from 1965 to 1977, and whose sons helped run a series of restaurants and concert halls in Philly, including two in Chestnut Hill, for more than three decades, died of age-related illnesses on October 19 at the age of 98.

In his twenties, Bynum joined the Montford Point Marines, the first African-American unit of the US Marines, starting in 1942. He began his entrepreneurial career in bars and cafes in North Philadelphia and in Germantown. In 1965, he opened the Cadillac Club at 3738 Germantown Ave., and it quickly became the hottest jazz club in town.

Some of the stars who played at the Cadillac Club were Nina Simone, BB King, Redd Foxx, Kenny Gamble, Woody Herman, Count Basie, Gladys Knight, Fats Domino, George Benson, Billy Paul, The Stylistics and even the Soul Queen, Aretha Franklin.

Billy Paul, who lived near 16th Street and South Street at the time, held the country’s number one record in December 1972, “Me and Mrs. Jones”. Paul was so grateful to Mr. Bynum for the career boost he provided that Paul called his debut album “Feelin ‘Good at the Cadillac Club”.

In an interview in 1978, Paul told me, “Mr. Bynum is a wonderful man who has helped so many artists and brought so much class to Philly. His wife, Ruth, looked after the finances, and his sons, Robert and Benjamin Jr. also worked there. There was no better place to play. All musicians have sad stories about the club owners who scammed them, but not Mr. Bynum. He treated everyone fairly.

Due to changing musical tastes and the popularity of disco in the 1970s, the Cadillac Club was transformed into the Impulse nightclub in 1977, which the family closed in 1991. In a previous interview, Benjamin Jr. recalled how, as a young boy, he met performers like Gladys Knight & the Pips, who regularly visited the family home in Mt. Airy when they were in town playing Cadillac: “Most of the time I was in bed. Most of the time I look at pictures and remember stories about how my mom got Aretha Franklin’s ears for the evening. But honestly, I don’t even remember how old I was when it happened. “

The two sons, who both attended Central High School, followed in their father’s jazzy footsteps in 1990 when they opened Zanzibar Blue, a jazz restaurant / club at 11th and Spruce Streets. In 1996, the Bynum brothers moved Zanzibar Blue to a location below the Bellevue Hotel, but they closed it in 2007. Benjamin Jr. said at the time: “We didn’t think he was in. our interest in renewing the lease.

In 1995, the Bynum brothers also opened Warmdaddy’s, another music restaurant, on Front Street in Old Town, moving it 10 years later to a complex in Pennsport that also houses the Riverview Cinema. While the sons had previously worked for their father at the Cadillac Club, at Warmdaddy the roles were turned and Ben Sr. worked for them. He worked at the club gate every Friday and Saturday night, even after Warmdaddy’s moved into his second home in Pennsport.

In August of last year, the Bynums closed Warmdaddy’s, attributing the move to the pandemic, but they have since moved to 1410 Mt. Vernon St. in Fairmount, next to the South Restaurant and Jazz Club, which the Bynums have opened. in 2015.

The Bynum brothers also own and operate Relish, a music and dining venue located at 7162 Ogontz Ave. at West Oak Lane. And they’ve been involved for a while with Al Paris in Heirloom, a BYOB fine-dining restaurant next to the State Store on top of the hill from 2011 to 2015 and Paris Bistro & Jazz Club next to the Chestnut Hill hotel from January 2014, until March 2020, victim of the pandemic. (Veteran Chestnut Hill restaurateurs Rob and Vanessa Mullen took over Paris Bistro in 2018. Bynum was already gone, with Al Paris in full control.)

Benjamin Bynum Sr. continued to work until he was 90 and said he would never fully retire. His sons certainly carry on the family tradition of providing good music and good food. His wife, Ruth, died at age 80 in 2005. Besides his sons, he is survived by a brother, James, who is 100 years old (sister, Zellen, died last year at 102); his partner, Thelma Peake, and daughters Antoinette, Benita and Denee and nine grandchildren, seven great grandchildren and one great great grandchild.

Len Lear can be contacted at lenlear@chestnuthilllocal.com.

]]>
https://iridiumjazz.com/the-icon-of-the-mont-airy-jazz-club-marine-pioneer-dies-at-98/feed/ 0
Iconic jazz venue Ronnie Scott’s relaunches late-night shows https://iridiumjazz.com/iconic-jazz-venue-ronnie-scotts-relaunches-late-night-shows/ https://iridiumjazz.com/iconic-jazz-venue-ronnie-scotts-relaunches-late-night-shows/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 16:11:47 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/iconic-jazz-venue-ronnie-scotts-relaunches-late-night-shows/ As Ronnie Scott’s celebrates his 62nd birthday, the iconic Soho Jazz Hall is relaunching its lineup of legendary Late Late Shows… Photo: Ronnie Scott’s Open four nights a week, Ronnie’s now brings in Londoners jazz, neo soul, jazz funk and DJs until the early hours of the morning. The ongoing program of performers and musicians […]]]>

As Ronnie Scott’s celebrates his 62nd birthday, the iconic Soho Jazz Hall is relaunching its lineup of legendary Late Late Shows…

Photo: Ronnie Scott’s

Open four nights a week, Ronnie’s now brings in Londoners jazz, neo soul, jazz funk and DJs until the early hours of the morning.

The ongoing program of performers and musicians ensures that there is something for new fans and the diehard among us.

Wednesday the nights continue to feature jazz-centric performances with the best rising stars of the future.

These parties will also feature some of the top performers on the UK scene today, including the saxophonist Rachael Cohen, trumpeter Mark Kavuma, guitarist Dani Diodato and Big Band frontman and trumpeter Matt Roberts.

Thursday evenings are devoted to neo-soul, nu-jazz, R&B and hip hop, an evening reflecting the diverse and vibrant UK music scene.

Resident hosts will get things going, including Basement JAXX and singer Dizzee Rascal Vula Malinga, BRIT School Renato Paris star and hip-hop jazz artists JD3.

Pioneer New Zealand drummer Myele Manzanza tracks the nu-jazz scene and brings audiences a fusion of hip hop, dance and jazz into the morning hours.

At Friday and Saturday at night, everything revolves around groups.

Crossing genres, Ronnie Scott’s Late Late Shows now feature groovy and bass, jazz, funk, soul and more.

Tight, stylish and groovy instrumentalists, singers and DJs come together to present some of the most exciting live experiences around, featuring artists like Robin Mularkey, The Drawtones and the incredible British bassist Yolande Charles MBE.

Founded in 1959 by saxophonists Ronnie Scott and Pete King, Ronnie Scott’s has grown into one of the most famous jazz clubs in the world.

The club initially opened in a small basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London’s West End and moved to its current home in 1965.

It was the place where local musicians could jam and showcased the best of British jazz talent, as well as many prominent American and international jazz artists to British jazz fans later.

Since the beginnings of Sarah Vaughan, Count Basie and Miles Davis, the club has continued to feature some of the biggest names in jazz, as well as rising stars.

The club also has a charity – the Ronnie Scott’s Charitable Foundation – dedicated to supporting jazz and music education in the UK and beyond.

The aim of the association is to make music education accessible to all children and adolescents, especially those who are disadvantaged, by raising and distributing funds and donating musical instruments to organizations. who create and develop music education programs for young people.

Tickets: from £ 12
Schedule: from 11 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday
Address: 47 Frith Street, Soho W1D 4HT
Website: ronniescotts.co.uk



]]>
https://iridiumjazz.com/iconic-jazz-venue-ronnie-scotts-relaunches-late-night-shows/feed/ 0
Former Frenchmen Street statesman in New Orleans, jazz cornetist Jack Fine has died | Music https://iridiumjazz.com/former-frenchmen-street-statesman-in-new-orleans-jazz-cornetist-jack-fine-has-died-music/ https://iridiumjazz.com/former-frenchmen-street-statesman-in-new-orleans-jazz-cornetist-jack-fine-has-died-music/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 21:30:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/former-frenchmen-street-statesman-in-new-orleans-jazz-cornetist-jack-fine-has-died-music/ Cornetist Jack Fine, who moved to New Orleans late in his life and became an older statesman in the Frenchmen Street jazz scene, died in the Touro Infirmary on July 16. He was 92 years old. With a particularly sweet cornet tone and an endless amount of storytelling, Fine lived a colorful and well-traveled life […]]]>

Cornetist Jack Fine, who moved to New Orleans late in his life and became an older statesman in the Frenchmen Street jazz scene, died in the Touro Infirmary on July 16. He was 92 years old.

With a particularly sweet cornet tone and an endless amount of storytelling, Fine lived a colorful and well-traveled life even before arriving in New Orleans in the 1990s.

Born in Brooklyn in 1928, he enlisted in the Air Force at age 17. He was a military police officer and served in British Guiana. He claimed to have survived three plane crashes. “I got away from all of them,” he said in an interview in 2020.

He spent time in Singapore, a “hip place.” There are some interesting things happening in Singapore that never happen elsewhere. “

Back in New York City, he celebrated 52nd Street jazz clubs in the heyday of “Swing Street” and befriended Danny Barker, the jazz guitarist, banjoist, singer and storyteller of New Orleans.

In the 1950s, he worked at Milt Gabler’s Commodore Music Shop, the crossroads of the New York jazz scene. He was a regular at the legendary Monday night jam sessions at Jimmy Ryan’s club on 52nd Street. He crossed paths with jazz legends who are, for most fans, more of a myth than an actual memory.

Fine operated the Cinderella Club at 82 W. Third St. in Greenwich Village. Billie Holiday, Thelonious Monk and Mae West were regulars. He lived and performed in Paris for a while.

Along the way, he married several times and had three children, with whom he lost contact.

He was well into his seventh decade when he moved to New Orleans. “When I heard this music, I knew it was for me,” he said. “This is where it started. It was a good place to be for jazz. I’m so glad I had the chance to be a part of it, even though I arrived a bit late.

He played at the Old Point Bar in Alger Point during the day and haunted the Rue des Français at night. He has performed with the New Orleans Jazz Vipers, the Smoking Time Jazz Club, and the New Orleans Swamp Donkeys Traditional Jass Band, among others, and has delighted young musicians with his stories about jazz greats.

“I liked the excitement,” he said of Frenchmen Street. “People really listened to the music. “

In 2017, Fine moved to an independent retirement community in the West Bank. But he was struggling to keep up with his medications, diet and personal hygiene, and could be cantankerous as a result. When administrators felt he needed more care than the retirement community could provide, he was asked to leave.






Cornettist Jack Fine, right, has performed with many jazz greats in New York City and had adventures all over the world before moving to New Orleans late in his life. At 91, in poor health and with nowhere to go, he found a home with local trumpeter James Williams, left, who runs the New Orleans Swamp Donkeys. The two men are discussing music at home this Monday, August 10, 2020.




Swamp Donkeys trumpeter and singer James Williams had visited Fine, so he was asked to host him. The tenants who lived in a tiny house at the back of Williams’ Mid-City property had recently moved, so Fine moved in.

He sipped the Ensure nutritional shake, practiced on his cone, watched old movies and listened to records with Williams, who was six decades younger.

“We spent some time together and had a great time,” said Williams. “There have been good times and bad, but always the best. You never knew what you were going to get. Jack was a character. When he was Jack he was 100% Jack.

In June, after a fall, he was transferred to a care facility. In early July, he was hospitalized with an infection, said Williams, who only recently learned that Fine had died.

Plans for a celebration of her life are on hold.

Purchases made through links on our site may earn us an affiliate commission

]]>
https://iridiumjazz.com/former-frenchmen-street-statesman-in-new-orleans-jazz-cornetist-jack-fine-has-died-music/feed/ 0
The Marine Theater Jazz in the Bar series continues with singer Véronique Joly https://iridiumjazz.com/the-marine-theater-jazz-in-the-bar-series-continues-with-singer-veronique-joly/ https://iridiumjazz.com/the-marine-theater-jazz-in-the-bar-series-continues-with-singer-veronique-joly/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 11:35:25 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-marine-theater-jazz-in-the-bar-series-continues-with-singer-veronique-joly/ WHEN singer Astrud Gilberto released her classic Latin American bossa nova album, “The Girl From Ipanema”, her crystal-clear vocal style and the softly singing beats of Antonio Carlos Jobim’s songs including “One Note Samba” and “Corcovado “, thus like title song, enchanted a generation. Renowned singer Véronique Joly will sing his music, accompanied by Rob […]]]>

WHEN singer Astrud Gilberto released her classic Latin American bossa nova album, “The Girl From Ipanema”, her crystal-clear vocal style and the softly singing beats of Antonio Carlos Jobim’s songs including “One Note Samba” and “Corcovado “, thus like title song, enchanted a generation.

Renowned singer Véronique Joly will sing his music, accompanied by Rob Palmer on guitar at the upcoming Marine Theater Jazz in the Bar event.

Astrud Gilberto was born in Brazil, and in her late teens she was part of the ever-growing bossa nova scene, led by singer / guitarist Joao Gilberto, who would soon become her husband.

When they moved to New York City together, Joao recorded a record with American saxophonist Stan Getz. After casually participating in a rehearsal, Astrud was invited to sing on the song “The Girl from Ipanema”.

Later she said: “I will never forget that while we were listening to the song that had just been recorded in the studio control room, Stan told me, with a very dramatic expression,” this song goes make you famous “.”

Astrud indeed had a very successful recording career in the 1960s, 70s and beyond.

She received the Latin Jazz USA Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1992 and was inducted into the International Latin Music Hall of Fame in 2002.

His original recording of ‘Fly Me to the Moon’ was edited as a duet using a recording of the same song by Frank Sinatra for the soundtrack to the film ‘Down with Love’, and his recording ‘Who Can I Turn To?’ was sampled by the Black Eyed Peas in the song “Like That”.

Parisian-born singer Véronique Joly began performing live at the age of 17, working in the Parisian music scene before moving to London in 1992.

She has been involved in many diverse projects, including co-writing and recording a song for the BBC program “Rick Stein: French Odyssey”, and the voice for the movie “Night Dragon”.

She sings in English, French and Portuguese.

Brighten up your November with the sultry sounds of the Brazilian sun at this latest Jazz in the Bar event, taking place at the Marine Theater in Lyme Regis on Sunday, November 7 from 8 p.m. ET.

Cost of tickets £ 10 in advance or £ 12 on site, available at www.marinetheater.com

]]>
https://iridiumjazz.com/the-marine-theater-jazz-in-the-bar-series-continues-with-singer-veronique-joly/feed/ 0