France – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 22:07:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png France – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 Makaya McCraven: In These Times Review – a generous unwind | Jazz https://iridiumjazz.com/makaya-mccraven-in-these-times-review-a-generous-unwind-jazz/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/makaya-mccraven-in-these-times-review-a-generous-unwind-jazz/ Bborn in Paris, raised in the bohemian enclave of Northampton, Massachusetts and based in Chicago, percussionist and songwriter Makaya McCraven is not one for boundaries or restrictions. His fourth album of original compositions – his wider discography is busier than that – sees the drummer ignoring many of the preconceptions that come with the word […]]]>

Bborn in Paris, raised in the bohemian enclave of Northampton, Massachusetts and based in Chicago, percussionist and songwriter Makaya McCraven is not one for boundaries or restrictions. His fourth album of original compositions – his wider discography is busier than that – sees the drummer ignoring many of the preconceptions that come with the word “jazz” in favor of something you might call improvised music from black origin. In this, he makes common cause with updates such as our very own Shabaka Hutchings and Nubya Garcia, who collaborated with McCraven on 2018. universal beingsand Jeff Parker of Tortoise, Chicago avant-garde, guest here on guitar.

In these times no shortage of elegiac horns or intense time signatures – McCraven’s latest work, 2021 Decrypt the message, reinvented Blue Note classics. The title track samples Harry Belafonte discussing mythical African-American figure John Henry, situating this record within the ongoing struggle for black self-determination. But there’s a generous sense of unwinding here, with hip-hop breakbeats (on a standout, Dream Another) and nods to machine-made music amongst the lavish, genre-independent orchestral instrumentation.

And yet the dreamy murmurs of Brandee Younger’s harp can’t help evoking cosmic jazz, De’Sean Jones’ flute is no stranger to the conservatory, and McCraven himself is a virtuoso of the polyrhythms of hell for leather: just listen to it continue on Seventh String.

]]>
10 movies to watch if you love jazz https://iridiumjazz.com/10-movies-to-watch-if-you-love-jazz/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 23:20:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/10-movies-to-watch-if-you-love-jazz/ The spontaneous expression of improvisation, the melodic freedom, the harmonic union of parts and the channeling of happy or blue feelings. The characteristics of jazz as a musical genre are also found in films. In the same way that chords accompany the main melody, good cinematography supports an exciting plot, or sound design enhances a […]]]>

The spontaneous expression of improvisation, the melodic freedom, the harmonic union of parts and the channeling of happy or blue feelings. The characteristics of jazz as a musical genre are also found in films. In the same way that chords accompany the main melody, good cinematography supports an exciting plot, or sound design enhances a good edit.


Jazz has captivated people’s minds and ears for a long time, and its unlimited creative freedom, intricate rhythms and beautiful harmonies have influenced many films that focus on the music itself or instead use its nature as a source of inspiration. ‘inspiration.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

ten La La Terre (2016)

<

When an aspiring actress (Emma Stone) and a jazz pianist (Ryan Gosling) meet in Los Angeles, their love for each other interferes with their rising careers.

Related: 10 Non-Musical Movies That Would Make Great Musicals, According To Reddit

The romantic musical that made Damien Chazelle the youngest director to win the Oscar is a sensational production, with colorful musical numbers and a moving story carefully crafted by Chazelle, who as drummer has a special eye for precise details and rhythm. Although the film does not delve too deeply into the essence of jazz, The Earth is a show that can delight anyone, regardless of musical preference.

9 Soul (2020)

When pianist and music teacher Joe Gardner finds himself in “The Great Before,” halfway between Earth and “The Great Beyond,” he must team up with a rebellious soul named 22 to return to Earth.

Praised for its artful jazz soundtrack and emotional story that tackles themes such as purpose, death and the afterlife, Soul released on Christmas 2020 to become one of the best animated musicals of all time. With meaningful musical moments and reflections on life, Soul is an experience that lingers in the ears and hearts for a long time, and a special experience for anyone who appreciates the beauty of jazz.

8 Collateral (2004)

Michael Mann’s neo-noir action thriller Collateral features Jamie Foxx as a taxi driver and Tom Cruise as a calculating hitman who just happens to be a jazz fanatic.

One of the film’s most memorable scenes takes place at a jazz club, where Vincent (Cruise) and Max (Jamie Foxx) stop over during their long night of amendments. Before Vincent makes the owner pay for his faulty knowledge of jazz history, he shares with the taxi driver a cold reflection on life derived from jazz. The duo continues like a late-night jam, rushing and dragging, improvising throughout the journey.

seven Taxi Driver (1976)

One of the darkest films on the list is Martin Scorsese’s 1976 masterpiece, a cynical and maniacal investigation into the life of a deranged veteran and taxi driver in New York City.

Related: 10 Best Movie Soundtracks Of All Time, According To Ranker

Its soundtrack is the last composition in the career of the legendary Bernard Herrman, who also worked in vertigo, Psychosisand Citizen Kane. The jazz tunes that accompany Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro) as he ruminates through the morally degraded city make up much of the unstable, gray feeling that Taxi driver depicts.

6 Green Book (2018)

Named after The Negro Motorist Green Book, green paper follows a gifted jazz pianist (Mahershala Ali) and his hired driver (Viggo Mortensen) on their musical tour through the Deep South.

Winner of the 2018 Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay and Best Supporting Actor, green paper is a great film about music that is not a musical. Inspired by the true story of Don Shirley, the film features various musical moments in which the pianist displays his classically influenced jazz, and the various shows he performs are a theme that evolves with the story.

5 All That Jazz (1979)

Inspired by director Bob Fosse’s efforts to put together a movie while staging the Broadway musical Chicago at the same time, this musical is a comedic, honest self-portrait that has established itself as one of the best musicals in jukebox of all time.

Like jazz, the film flirts with acid and dark themes, while remaining playful, and its frenetic choreography relies on sentiment. Called by famed director Stanley Kubrick “the best movie I think I’ve ever seen” (via reel world), And all that remains more than forty years after its release one of the best jazzy films to dive into.

4 Chico and Rita (2010)

With a plot reminiscent of The Earththis Spanish animated film follows the romance between a jazz pianist and an aspiring singer who find themselves divided by their careers.

Related: 10 Famous Directors Who Got Their Starts In Music Videos

In a historically accurate Havana and New York, chico and rita see their relationship swing to the sound of Latin Jazz, which is accompanied by colorful and tropical entertainment. Starring famous jazz musicians such as Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Chano Pozo and Thelonious Monk, the film pays homage to the genre, and its famous soundtrack brings the story to life.

3 Midnight in Paris (2011)

Woody Allen’s romantic comedy isn’t just jazzy in its soundtrack. As Gil (Owen Wilson) wanders through Paris, the scenes and characters he encounters are every bit as colorful, messy, and fun as jazz.

The film feels like a love letter to Paris, one of the cities with the greatest jazz cultures in the world, and the historical characters who appear to the protagonist convey reactions similar to those of the various subgenres of jazz. Midnight in Paris is a hilarious journey through time in the City of Light, and it shares its ultimate essence with the spontaneous, impromptu genre that is jazz – living in the present rather than yearning for the past.

2 Ray (2004)

Considered one of the best musical biopics of all time, the 2004 film depicts the life and career of genius musician Ray Charles. Raised in poverty, Ray (Jamie Foxx) went blind shortly after discovering his gift and love for music.

The independently produced film is a reflection of the musician’s life, brilliant and tumultuous. He pioneered the genre of soul music by combining different genres like blues, jazz, and gospel, and his career was filled with romantic affairs and drug use. Ray is a heartfelt biopic about one of history’s greatest jazz musicians, a gripping film for anyone who’s ever heard the musical genius of Ray Charles.

1 Whiplash (2014)

Although jazz is an art form available and enjoyable to all, only those who push beyond what is expected of them reach the highest heavens of this beautiful musical genre. Damien Chazelle’s psychological drama follows an ambitious drummer (Miles Teller) and the brutal tutoring he receives from Terence Fletcher (JK Simmons).

With a tight tempo that keeps the audience on their toes as they watch the drummer’s quest for perfection, the film reveals the rigor needed to achieve greatness. And its grand finale shows the price that comes with it.

Next: 10 Best Jazz And Blues Movies Like Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, Ranked

]]>
The music industry is desperate for “the voice of a new generation” as mysterious jazz funk remixes leak from World Surf League headquarters: “Teahupo’o… as the locals prefer to call it”. https://iridiumjazz.com/the-music-industry-is-desperate-for-the-voice-of-a-new-generation-as-mysterious-jazz-funk-remixes-leak-from-world-surf-league-headquarters-teahupoo-as-the-locals-prefer-to-call-it/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 22:25:17 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-music-industry-is-desperate-for-the-voice-of-a-new-generation-as-mysterious-jazz-funk-remixes-leak-from-world-surf-league-headquarters-teahupoo-as-the-locals-prefer-to-call-it/ “Every shot of the place looks like a crime scene that’s been cleaned up…” Four days ago, the WSL’s four million Instagram followers received an innocuous promotional spot for the Best and Western in Huntington Beach, California. Bee-Dubs HB is not Raffles or Four seasons, but what is it? The hotel’s only hot tub is […]]]>

“Every shot of the place looks like a crime scene that’s been cleaned up…”

Four days ago, the WSL’s four million Instagram followers received an innocuous promotional spot for the Best and Western in Huntington Beach, California.

Bee-Dubs HB is not Raffles or Four seasons, but what is it? The hotel’s only hot tub is a bit crowded and the water is cloudy at times and the breakfast buffet will cost fifty percent with tip, but you’re on the beach, the beds are clean and the rooms are three times the size of their Parisian equivalent.

In the paid ad, Anastasia Ashley of San Clemente, Queen Bitch on ABC’s The Ultimate Surfer and who appeared in a Sport-illustrated swimsuit number alongside Kate Upton and Chrissy Teigen, gives a little PG POV action in the hotel, wake up, drink coffee, go surfing with friends.

It’s a pretty spot from the noted influencer whose face is as sharp, pointy as a stork’s beak and has the mysterious beauty of things seasoned by storms.

The response from surf fans, however, shocked even the most hardened media pundits.

First, from the two hottest surfboard shapers in the world.

Carissa Moore’s shaper Matt Biolos, “What the hell is that trash?”

John John Florence Fleet Builder Jon Pyzel, “Pro surfing 2022?”

From Tour Notes creator and Kelly Slater teammate Peter King,
“Every shot of the place looks like a crime scene that’s been cleaned up.”

Others,

“Well, if everyone didn’t already think the WSL was a joke, I’m pretty sure that sealed the deal.”

“wsl what have you become.”

“Good to see you didn’t fire the creative geniuses who thought ‘The Ultimate Surfer’ was a good idea.”

“I heard this is the new format for the WSL 5 Finals…whoever checks into the most Best Western hotels in the Mid West, with speed, power and waffles to go will be determined the champion of the undisputed world of discount parking, by Chris Cote…”

“HB PD still hitting this @bestwestern for crack and prostitutes.”

“Eric Logan has to go.”

“Jesus christtt. You keep fulfilling Bobby Martinez’s premonition. It’s terribly awful. If it has anything to do with surfing, let me know.

“F*ck ELO and the WSL. What the hell happened to the best surfers in the world, in the best waves in the world???

“Corporate whores.”

Anastasia’s response to the fury was typically classy, ​​”If anyone hates a free breakfast, with inflation, I’ll eat all the waffles I can.”

Why the passionate response, you think?

Is there racism in there that I can’t see?

Or too white?

An intersectional void?

Too asexual given the heat of the cast?

As dear Charlie likes to say, more questions than answers right now.

]]>
Acclaimed Jazz Duo to Perform September 20 at Scott Concert Hall – News https://iridiumjazz.com/acclaimed-jazz-duo-to-perform-september-20-at-scott-concert-hall-news/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 18:56:28 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/acclaimed-jazz-duo-to-perform-september-20-at-scott-concert-hall-news/ Campbell University’s Artist Performance Series will host the acclaimed jazz duo of flautist Peter H. Bloom and pianist John Funkhouser at 8 p.m. on September 20 at Scott Concert Hall on main campus. The concert will celebrate the duo’s CDExuberant Ellingtonia, with precious stones by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn, Juan Tizol and Mercer Ellington. Among […]]]>

Campbell University’s Artist Performance Series will host the acclaimed jazz duo of flautist Peter H. Bloom and pianist John Funkhouser at 8 p.m. on September 20 at Scott Concert Hall on main campus.

The concert will celebrate the duo’s CDExuberant Ellingtonia, with precious stones by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn, Juan Tizol and Mercer Ellington. Among the many selections are Don’t move much anymore, caravan, I’m starting to see the light, In a sentimental mood and Jump for joy.

Praised for “his style and his brilliance… liveliness and sophistication,”The duo will bring “virtuosity and inventiveness to beloved classics like Take train A, things ain’t what they used to be, prelude to a kiss and Strayhorn’s lush ballad Chelsea Bridge. Exuberant Ellingtonia has been called a “treasure” by Texture Magazine and “one of those albums that we know are unique jewels” (Jazz, ese ruidoSpain).

Bloom and Funkhouser have been performing together for almost 30 years. Both are veterans of the legendary Aardvark Jazz Orchestra (50e season, “one of the best jazz ensembles in the world” – Jazz Podium, Germany). Each of them has impressive national and international credentials.

Peter H. Bloom performs in the United States, Canada, Europe, Asia, New Zealand and Australia, and appears on 48 CDs. Acclaimed for his virtuosity and versatility, he performs widely with classical and jazz ensembles. He has shared the stage with Charles Neville, Sheila Jordan, Geri Allen, Ricky Ford, Jaki Byard and other jazz greats. He is a contributing editor to Noteworthy Sheet Music and is the recipient of the Noah Greenberg Award from the American Musicological Society. jazz improvisation praised its “exquisite melody…the improvisations growing organically out of theme”, while ArtsFuse wrote, “Bloom’s flute and amplified flute solos are always the highlights of a performance.”

John Funkhouser appeared with such notables as Luciana Souza, Tierney Sutton, Ran Blake, Herb Pomeroy, Laszlo Gardony, Stan Strickland and piano scholar Matt Savage. Praised for “a unique and engaging sound” (Denver North Grandstand), hhas performed at Birdland, Blue Note, Dizzy’s New York, Kennedy Center and the best sites from Kansas City, New Orleans and Chicago to Paris, Singapore and Hong Kong. He taught at Berklee College of Music from 2001 to 2021.”Funkhouser is masterful… maintaining a delicate balance of power and agility with an instinctive musical sense. (AllAboutJazz.com)

For more information contact (910) 893-1502.

]]>
Renowned jazz musicians will perform in Baku https://iridiumjazz.com/renowned-jazz-musicians-will-perform-in-baku/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 06:30:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/renowned-jazz-musicians-will-perform-in-baku/ By Laman Ismayilova Renowned jazz musicians Melvin Travis and Mina Agossi will perform at the Heydar Aliyev Center on September 30, reports Azernews. The concert will take place as part of the Baku Jazz Festival scheduled for September 23-30. On this day, jazz lovers have a chance to enjoy the marvelous performance, mesmerizing rhythm and […]]]>

By Laman Ismayilova

Renowned jazz musicians Melvin Travis and Mina Agossi will perform at the Heydar Aliyev Center on September 30, reports Azernews.

The concert will take place as part of the Baku Jazz Festival scheduled for September 23-30.

On this day, jazz lovers have a chance to enjoy the marvelous performance, mesmerizing rhythm and amazing energy.

French jazzman Melvin Travis, aka Mister Melvin, studied at the Black Music School in Paris and performed with famous jazz musicians such as Michèle Hendricks, Derek Martin and Jean Carpenter.

He performs in a specific way, addressing genres such as jazz, soul, funk and blues. Melvin is also an excellent composer, writer and voice teacher.

Mina Agossi, another famous representative of French jazz, having studied in France, Morocco and Nigeria, lived and worked in the United States and Spain.

She quickly gained fame in the jazz world, knowing the musical culture of many countries and combining it in her work. Agossi’s repertoire includes hip-hop, blues, jazz and even rock.

The Baku Jazz Festival has become an essential part of musical life in Azerbaijan. The long-awaited event will once again bring together incredibly talented jazz musicians from Azerbaijan, Turkey, Brazil, Norway, Belgium, Germany and other countries.

On the program of the festival, meetings with musicians, concerts, master classes, exhibitions, jam sessions, and the “I am a Jazzman” competition for young talents.

Follow us on twitter @AzerNewsAz

]]>
Melody Gardot in a smoky jazz duet; a hot slate at the Drake, and more https://iridiumjazz.com/melody-gardot-in-a-smoky-jazz-duet-a-hot-slate-at-the-drake-and-more/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 13:37:43 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/melody-gardot-in-a-smoky-jazz-duet-a-hot-slate-at-the-drake-and-more/ In the music world, it’s now a classic comeback story: how the jazz singer Melody Gardotthen 19, was hit by a car while riding a bicycle in her hometown of Philadelphia in 2003 and suffered serious head and spinal injuries, a fractured pelvis and neurological damage which affected his movements and his memory. She also […]]]>

In the music world, it’s now a classic comeback story: how the jazz singer Melody Gardotthen 19, was hit by a car while riding a bicycle in her hometown of Philadelphia in 2003 and suffered serious head and spinal injuries, a fractured pelvis and neurological damage which affected his movements and his memory.

She also ended up with hypersensitivity to light and sound and had to learn to walk again once she finally got up from her hospital bed.

But Gardot, who comes to Northampton Academy of Music on September 11 at 8 p.m., has spent some of his recovery time writing songs, learning to play the guitar lying on his back and leaning in general on the music as a vital part. of therapy. In the nearly two decades since her accident, she has released six albums and won legions of fans – especially in Europe – who are drawn to her smoky jazz/blues voice, piano playing and compositions.

Gardot, who is fluent in French and also knows other languages, has traveled and performed extensively in Europe; she calls herself a “citizen of the world”. As such, she’s absorbed many influences, and on her latest album, “Entre Eux Deux” (Between Us Two), released in May, she distilled some of them down to a spare soundscape of her vocals at alongside piano accompaniment by French-Brazilian keyboardist Philippe Powell — this is the first time she hasn’t played piano on one of her albums.

“If I had to sum up the record in a few words,” Gardot said in an interview earlier this year, “I would say it’s a dance between two people who love and appreciate the same things: deep poetry and solid melodies. …it’s a glimpse into the universe of two artists who really like each other.

The 10 songs on the album, which Gardot sings in English and French, stem from an intense two-week workshop the two friends held in Gardot’s Paris apartment, overlooking the Eiffel Tower, during from which they wrote and shared lyrics, melodies and ideas. . In that sense, it’s very much a duet album, with Powell singing in harmony on a few tracks and the two sharing songwriting credits on a number of tracks.

It’s music for late, quiet evenings and moments of contemplation, with a few covers too, including “Plus Fort que Nous” from the classic French film “Un Homme et Une Femme”. Jazzwise calls the album “good stuff, the best album Gardot has ever made. Try it, you might like it; and if you’re a fan of moody torch songs, you probably will.”

Franco-American jazz singer Laura Angladewho drew comparisons to Anita O’Day, Shirley Horn and Blossom Dearie, opens the show.

Since opening this spring, the Drake in Amherst has earned a reputation for putting together a varied and eclectic lineup, and next week provides a case in point, as for four consecutive nights the downtown club will host a drummer jazz, traditional Irish music, a solo folk-rock band and two unique-sounding rock bands – in that order.

Starting things September 8 at 8 p.m. is a hot jazz drummer Jonathan Barber, who Modern Drummer readers voted Best Up-and-coming Drummer of 2018. He has previously recorded and toured with artists such as Pat Metheny, Terence Blanchard, Erykah Badu and Buster Williams, and Barber now leads his own jazz ensemble, Vision En before. He also teaches at the University of Connecticut.

September 9 at 7 p.m. Alt – Irish musicians John Doyle, Nuala Kennedy and Eamon O’Leary – come to The Drake to deliver an instrumental interaction that Acoustic Guitar Magazine calls “telepathic and miraculous”. Combining guitar, bouzouki, flute and vocals, the three musicians are all outstanding folk performers in their own right, but together create a sound that “is truly a celebration of friendship and song”, as they say so.

Then on September 10, at 8 p.m., the Drake hosts the valley favorite The suitcase race, aka Matt Lorenz, who specializes in guitar and vocals while playing homemade drums with his feet. He is also known for playing cymbals while holding a drumstick in the same hand he uses to strum his guitar. He is a versatile man.

Finally, the Swiss instrumental ensemble Lightningwhich offers the kind of danceable grooves alternatively called “expansive” and “spatial” — SPIN describes the band as “finding their way to instrumental bliss” — will be at The Drake on Sept. 11 at 8 p.m. valley rockers Carinae open the show.

If you’re looking for more musical variety, you can probably find it at Millpond Live, the free outdoor concert series (donations encouraged) at Easthampton’s Millside Park, which starts this year on September 9 and 10 with six bands playing everything from electronic fusion and R&B to Latin American beats and a variety of jazz. (Additional shows are on September 16 and 17.)

Of particular note during the concert on September 9, which takes place from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., is Mtali Shaka Banda and its whole. Banda, saxophonist, is originally from Amherst and the son of a Malawian refugee father and an African-American mother. Growing up, he also spent several years in Wisconsin and Georgia, then moved back to Massachusetts in Brockton, followed by a move to Israel when he was 18.

Living in Massachusetts again, Banda has absorbed many influences during his travels – jazz, funk, soul, folk, R&B and hip hop – and his music also contains elements of travelogues, memoirs and history. family. One thing he doesn’t play, he says, is the classic, “I’ve got too much backbeat in me.”

Visit millpond.live to see a list of other festival performers.

More music at your fingertips

banjo master Tony Trischka comes to Hawks & Reed Performing Arts Center in Greenfield on September 3 at 7:30 p.m. Michael Nixanother banjoist who also plays a unique instrument he designed, the banjar, which combines elements of a five-string banjo with the classical guitar.

New Orleans trombonist and singer Glen David Andrews and a few “special guests” will bring the jazzy sound and vibe of Crescent City to the Marigold Theater in Easthampton on September 3 at 8:30 p.m.

Veteran folksinger and songwriter Tom Rush will play at The Links Golf Course in Worthington on September 4 at 7:30 p.m.

High heightsthe Boston-based folk-pop duo of singer/guitarist Tim Harrington and singer/cellist Paul Wright, will perform Race Street Live in Holyoke on September 7 at 8 p.m. Kyle and Gretta Miller (and friends) who call each other Towing.

Steve Pfarrer can be contacted at spfarrer@gazettenet.com.

]]>
Sélébéyone: experimental hip-hop, jazz and Wolof https://iridiumjazz.com/selebeyone-experimental-hip-hop-jazz-and-wolof/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 04:18:19 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/selebeyone-experimental-hip-hop-jazz-and-wolof/ Wrapped in birdsong, the Senegalese filmmaker Djibril Diop Mambetthere opens “Djibril”, the second title of Selebeyonewith grave certainty. In French he tells us: “You must close your eyes. Have you closed your eyes? You see points of light. Close them well. Every time you want to see the light, you have to close your eyes.” […]]]>

Wrapped in birdsong, the Senegalese filmmaker Djibril Diop Mambetthere opens “Djibril”, the second title of Selebeyonewith grave certainty. In French he tells us: “You must close your eyes. Have you closed your eyes? You see points of light. Close them well. Every time you want to see the light, you have to close your eyes.”

It sums up an amazing album in Xaybu: the invisible it looks like a spiraling Miles Davis as a cosmonaut lost in the geometric prisms of Africa. Free jazz in the Lost Outer Dimensions may not be for everyone, but this ‘international avant-rap collective’, as they like to call themselves, is less like session musicians polishing their hits. of language when the Senegalese star, Gaston Bandimicis unleashed at the heart of it all.

In wormholes of terror and abject confusion, this band’s finest moments are when they search for spirituality and mysticism through the chaos of sound. Saxophonists Steve Lehman from Los Angeles and Maciek Lasserre de Paris takes advantage of the energy emanating from Bandimic. He pronounces in Wolof as if for the last time.

The fact that he and Lasserre are both Sufi Muslims gives the record a form of its own and attempts to reveal their connection to the unknown. When I manage to find him, he is in Lyon with his family. A hip-hop star back in Africa, he appears on this transatlantic album that sometimes sounds like a bad dream in an 80s movie. What’s the deal here?

Bandimic describes making music as creating new worlds, citing “the symbiosis of cultures and civilizations” and how “jazz isn’t symmetrical, it’s another level — just like the spirit isn’t palpable . It’s abstract.”


“It’s an album of trying to find something,” explains Bandimic, “How humans are a universe unto themselves. How we all contain the universe within us. The sun and the moon are within me. Really understanding the nature is to understand this.

It is quite clear that there is no straying from the deep in this work. “With all this connection, a human has to live as if he were alone on earth. Face to face with another person, he is face to face with himself. Hurting others is hurting yourself, you know? “.

Touring the world as a live band, they’ve grown from an outfit that sends files to each other online to a unit with a purpose. For them: to forge something bigger than themselves.

“We come from a system that is passed down from generation to generation as a way of life,” he says, “We made this record to share our way of thinking and convey the world we want to see.”

Born in Dakar, Bandimic is a back and forth between two worlds and many projects. Raising his family in France but constantly returning home. “African society wants to look like Europe. Language, fashion, television…” He pauses, contemplating how all culture is disappearing in one way or another. “The French say that their culture is in danger. They don’t like Arabs eating Halal and speaking their own language, but the whole world is afraid of losing its identity.

On Xaybu, meaning “the invisible,” the notion of clinging to anything seems unnatural. That in our own worlds, order and “normalcy” are as abstract as anything else. Bandimic ends our conversation asking us to be careful. “The internet has stolen our humanity. Too much perversion and freedom is abuse,” he warns. “Humanity is hidden in darkness right now. Today, humans have lost their true value and wealth of spirit. It is material wealth that is taught from an early age, even in our schools. There must be more than that.

From articles on your site

Related articles on the web

]]>
Jazz legend Houston Person joins a trio for a show in Jersey City https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-legend-houston-person-joins-a-trio-for-a-show-in-jersey-city/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 15:10:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-legend-houston-person-joins-a-trio-for-a-show-in-jersey-city/ One of today’s most recorded jazz saxophonists, Houston Person will perform at The Statuary in Jersey City on Saturday, August 27 from 6-9 p.m. Person, a tenor saxophonist who began his musical journey on the piano, has over 100 albums to his credit as a bandleader and has performed on over 300 total albums throughout […]]]>

One of today’s most recorded jazz saxophonists, Houston Person will perform at The Statuary in Jersey City on Saturday, August 27 from 6-9 p.m.

Person, a tenor saxophonist who began his musical journey on the piano, has over 100 albums to his credit as a bandleader and has performed on over 300 total albums throughout his career.

Person, who is 87, released his latest album, ‘Live in Paris’, in September last year.

Her other credits include “Blues and Other Love Songs” with Charles Brown; “Orfeu” with Ron Carter; “Back Talk and Pleasant Afternoon” with Charles Earland; “Friday Night Special” with Janis Siegel; “That Healin’ Feelin’” with Horace Silver; “Four Dimensions”, “Oh Happy Day” and “Tune Up” with Don Patterson; “Live at Club Mozambique” with grant green; “Sure ‘Nuff” featuring Sonny Phillips; “Good Vibrations”, “Broadway”, “Blues All Day Long” and “Hot Tat” with Richard “Groove” Holmes and up to nine releases with Johnny “Hammond” Smith and 16 releases with Etta Jones among others.

While under the Prestige label in the 1960s, Person released a string of albums that would help define the era’s soul jazz sound, including “Underground Soul”, “Chocomotive”, “Trust in Me” , “Blue Odyssey”, “Soul Dance” and “Goodness”.

Person will be joined for their performance by Matt Chertkoff on guitar, who has performed in nine countries and at jazz festivals and clubs around the world. Chertkoff shared the stage with Jimmy Cobb, Freddy Cole, Grady Tate, Dee Bridgewater and Craig Handy. His national and international television appearances include Telemundo and Nippon networks as well as German national television.

Person and Chertkoff will also be joined by members of Chertkoff’s trio, Chris Berger on bass and Vince Ector on drums.

The statuary is located at 53 Congress St., Jersey City. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. Food includes taquitos, bopcorn, and $5 beer and wine. Admission is a suggested donation of $25 which will go towards the artist fees for the event. You can register online at https://bit.ly/3PIvhEn.

]]>
Jazz by Stéphane Wrembl at the Clark | Music | Hudson Valley https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-by-stephane-wrembl-at-the-clark-music-hudson-valley/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 13:11:18 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/jazz-by-stephane-wrembl-at-the-clark-music-hudson-valley/ The Clark Art Institute will get a dose of authentic gypsy jazz when guitarist Stéphane Wrembl and his band visit August 24 to perform outdoors at the museum. Wrembel and his band blend nonchalance and cheerful virtuosity, carrying on the groundbreaking traditions of jazz guitar popularized by the legendary and endlessly influential Django Reinhardt. Wrembel […]]]>

The Clark Art Institute will get a dose of authentic gypsy jazz when guitarist Stéphane Wrembl and his band visit August 24 to perform outdoors at the museum.

Wrembel and his band blend nonchalance and cheerful virtuosity, carrying on the groundbreaking traditions of jazz guitar popularized by the legendary and endlessly influential Django Reinhardt. Wrembel grew up in Fontainebleau, France, where he learned his trade among Roma communities at campsites in the French countryside. He was inspired by his Belgian-born Reinhardt, who spent his last years living in the wooded area outside of Paris. Reinhardt, a Romani guitar master, is known for inventing a distinctive style of guitar playing after his left hand was badly burned in a fire.

Although Wrembel is known for his stylization and interpretation of Reinhardt’s music, he created a sound all his own, blending jazz, blues, classical, swing, flamenco and rock. Wrembel brings his laid-back musical elegance to his original compositions, many of which have been featured in films such as Vicki Cristina Barcelona, ​​Midnight in Paris and Rifkin’s Festival. Wrembel performs worldwide and has performed at major concert halls including Carnegie Hall and the Caramoor Jazz Festival.

Stéphane Wrembl and his group will perform at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, on August 24 at 6 p.m. The concert is free and attendees are encouraged to bring a picnic and seats.

]]>
The Indigo Girls in Florence, Django-jazz in Amherst, etc. https://iridiumjazz.com/the-indigo-girls-in-florence-django-jazz-in-amherst-etc/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 14:26:18 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/the-indigo-girls-in-florence-django-jazz-in-amherst-etc/ The indigo girls can trace their origins – way back – to when singers Emily Saliers and Amy Ray met in elementary school in suburban Atlanta in the 1970s. In high school they played guitar together and developed their complex vocal harmonies, and in the late 1980s/early 1990s their folk-rock tracks like “Closer to Fine” […]]]>

The indigo girls can trace their origins – way back – to when singers Emily Saliers and Amy Ray met in elementary school in suburban Atlanta in the 1970s.

In high school they played guitar together and developed their complex vocal harmonies, and in the late 1980s/early 1990s their folk-rock tracks like “Closer to Fine” and “Hammer and a Nail” were making appearances. impressive in the charts; they won a Grammy in 1990 for Best Contemporary Folk Album.

The Indigo Girls, who play Pines Theater at Florence’s Look Park on Aug. 24 at 7 p.m., are also long-time icons of the LGBT rights movement and have spoken out on environmental issues and other progressive causes.

Their latest album, “Look Long” – their 16th album – looks back on their beginnings, with songs that reflect their childhood as well as the state of the nation today.

“Country Radio”, written by Saliers, is told by a teenager who turns on the radio to fight loneliness and dreams of falling in love like the characters in the songs. Then comes the chorus: “But as far as these songs will take me / That’s as far as I’ll go / I’m just a gay kid in a small town / Who likes country radio.”

“Muster,” written by Ray, delves into the scourge of gun violence: “Some people held their father’s guns / Me, I hung mine on the wall / For every war we could’ve won without them shoot it at all / Is this the best we could muster?”

The song, however, also comes with a chorus that promises an effort to change that dynamic: “We wanna catch up / We wanna do it right.”

The American songwriter calls the album “resolutely upbeat” and says it benefits from the work of producer John Reynolds, who “allows the music to resonate with just enough sparkle and brilliance to ensure that those melodies dynamics will be fully brought to the fore”.

Female dogwho uses violins, synthesizers and percussion to make music referred to as a “pop sorcerer poet,” opens the show.

With the long running Django in June series, Northampton has since the early 2000s been a summer destination for fans and players of Gypsy jazzor gypsy jazz, music first popularized by Franco-Belgian guitarist Django Reinhardt in the 1930s.

Now Amherst is getting in on the action a bit with a singer the New York Times has dubbed “the Gypsy-jazz Warbler,” a singer from New York City via Paris and Switzerland who has combined her French and Romanian gypsy roots with his love of the early to mid-20th century Parisian art scene to offer a fresh look at this music.

Tatiana Eva-Marie, who comes to the Drake in Amherst on August 20 at 8 p.m. with his accompaniment Avalon Jazz Band, grew up in Switzerland in a family of musicians but, as a teenager, also studied literature and theater in Paris; she later became involved in acting.

She moved to Brooklyn, New York about 10 years ago to expand her musical career, in which she embraced a number of influences, including New Orleans jazz and swing as well as modern jazz. She also re-examines Django Reinhardt’s music through her own arrangements and lyrics in a project she calls “Djangology”.

Songwriter and singer (bilingual), Eva-Marie and her band perform regularly in New York and have also toured the United States and many places abroad, including France, Switzerland and Romania . The group embodies the Gypsy jazz atmosphere, from acoustic guitars, violin and clarinet to the evening dress of the musicians.

She sees Brooklyn as a natural place to revive the songs and vibe of Paris circa the 1920s-1940s. “I prefer Brooklyn to anywhere else in New York because it has this bohemian feeling,” she said in an interview a few years ago. “It looks like a crossroads between Paris and New Orleans.”

And critics praised Eva-Marie for her evocation of Reinhardt’s musical legacy. “Tatiana Eva-Marie has always delighted audiences with her dynamic style and effervescent personality,” says The Citiview New York, “all of which fit firmly into the vintage gypsy jazz genre that Django pioneered.”

When it comes to jazz and vintage swing, a band from Valley has been at the heart of the music for about 25 years – and they still play that music, but more recently with a modified lineup.

Bob Sparkman’s Threesome, which plays North Hall in Huntington on Aug. 21 at 2 p.m., began as a duo when clarinetist Bob Sparkman met pianist Jerry Noble in the 1990s and the two began playing a mix of jazz, swing and of blues. They found inspiration in the work of vintage American composers like Fats Waller and Hoagy Carmichael.

About five years ago, the duo became a trio when they were joined by Kara Noble, Jerry’s wife, on bass. And at the Huntington concert, the trio will be joined by Ellen Redman on piccolo and flute to explore new material, including Trinidad calypsos, as well as old jazz classics.

Redman, who lives in Westfield, has been with the Springfield Symphony Orchestra since 1985 and has performed with other ensembles including the Boston Symphony; she also teaches flute and Irish flute at Smith College, where she previously led the school’s wind ensemble.

The August 21 concert is free, but donations are encouraged; all attendees must wear a face mask.

More music at your fingertips

The World Groove Partystarting at 8 p.m. tonight (Friday, August 19) at the Shea Theater in Montague, features three groups specializing in Afro-diasporic and Latin music, arts and culture: TapRoots, The Lost Tribe and Jose Gonzalez and Banda Criollo.

Pioneer Valley Jazz Stock opens its new season tonight at the Parlor Room in Northampton with a performance at 7.30pm by the four-member ensemble pneumawhich is an ancient Greek word for “breath”, “spirit” or “soul”.

Fans of The Suitcase Junket, Valley’s one-man band featuring Matt Lorenz, might want to check out Ben Prestage, who mixes electric and acoustic blues guitar with his foot drums to carve out a sound all his own. He plays at the Hawks & Reed Performing Arts Center in Greenfield tonight at 7:30 p.m.

The opening of Prestage will be the singer-songwriter Eric Phelpswho will also play Luthiers Co-op in Easthampton on August 20 at 8 p.m., where he’ll be joined by a backing band on songs from his new album, “Let it Rain.”

A brass quintet of MOSOthe indie band of musicians from the Springfield Symphony Orchestra, performs a free show Aug. 20 at 6 p.m. at Camp STAR Angelina in Springfield Forest Park.

The Eclectic Classic Set Ecce will perform the composer’s music Trevor Westonwho teaches at the Julliard School of Music, on August 20 at 7 p.m. at the Bombyx Center for Arts & Integrity in Florence.

The Deerfield Trio — cello, violin and piano — performs August 21 at 3 p.m. at the Memorial Hall Museum in Old Deerfield.

If you’re willing to take it a step further, you can meet a jazz trumpet player, composer, and five-time Grammy winner. Terence Blanchard at the Mass MoCA in North Adams on August 26 at 8 p.m. Blanchard and his ensemble will be joined by the small string group Turtle Island Quartet.

Steve Pfarrer can be contacted at spfarrer@gazettenet.com.

]]>