Australia – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 02:26:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Australia – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 In a little miracle, jazz returns to Hamer Hall https://iridiumjazz.com/in-a-little-miracle-jazz-returns-to-hamer-hall/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 02:26:46 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/in-a-little-miracle-jazz-returns-to-hamer-hall/ Melbourne International Jazz Festival GalaNovember 26, Hamer Hall After COVID killed the Melbourne International Jazz Festival 2020, Hadley Agrez (the festival’s CEO) and his team were determined not to let this year’s event suffer the same fate. Not wanting to admit defeat when the festival couldn’t go into October as planned, they frantically juggled artists […]]]>

Melbourne International Jazz Festival Gala
November 26, Hamer Hall

After COVID killed the Melbourne International Jazz Festival 2020, Hadley Agrez (the festival’s CEO) and his team were determined not to let this year’s event suffer the same fate. Not wanting to admit defeat when the festival couldn’t go into October as planned, they frantically juggled artists and venues to reinvent the program into a four-day event (December 2-5) and scheduled the opening night gala at the end of November. Their tenacity paid off, and on Friday night it was like a small miracle walking into Hamer Hall – along with 1,700 other patrons – and seeing a stage teeming with musicians against a starry backdrop.

Kate Cebrano and Eddie Perfect at the Melbourne International <a class=Jazz Festival gala.” src=”https://static.ffx.io/images/$zoom_0.131%2C$multiply_0.4431%2C$ratio_1.5%2C$width_756%2C$x_0%2C$y_0/t_crop_custom/q_86%2Cf_auto/3effa3b911a9a39945e5574ab87119cb65542c5f” height=”224″ width=”335″ srcset=”https://static.ffx.io/images/$zoom_0.131%2C$multiply_0.4431%2C$ratio_1.5%2C$width_756%2C$x_0%2C$y_0/t_crop_custom/q_86%2Cf_auto/3effa3b911a9a39945e5574ab87119cb65542c5f, https://static.ffx.io/images/$zoom_0.131%2C$multiply_0.8862%2C$ratio_1.5%2C$width_756%2C$x_0%2C$y_0/t_crop_custom/q_62%2Cf_auto/3effa3b911a9a39945e5574ab87119cb65542c5f 2x”/>

Kate Cebrano and Eddie Perfect at the Melbourne International Jazz Festival gala.Credit:Duncan Jacob

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This co-presentation of the MIJF and the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra featured the OSM alongside the Vanessa Perica Orchestra (a superb big band of 17 musicians), led by a rotating group of local singers. With a repertoire of familiar jazz standards and Eddie Perfect as an awesome host (and occasional singer), the show was clearly designed to appeal to a large audience. The emphasis was on airy swing and creamy ballads, with most arrangements by Chris Crenshaw of New York’s Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra.

Some numbers were more effective than others, and not all singers had songs suited to their style (Harry James Angus seemed particularly uncomfortable). Other singers shone. Thando’s impertinence struts in the colors of the gospel Little baby blues was utterly persuasive, and Kate Ceberano radiated warmth over Lark and a deep tenderness on A song for you.

For me, the last two acts of the evening (both arranged by Perica) were the most satisfying moments of the evening. At peacocks, singer Michelle Nicolle reveled in the rich orchestral colors and slipped through angular melodic intervals with unerring balance. And the composition of Perica Rebrahmanization made for a majestic finale, the OSM and the big band revel in the joyous propulsion of the air that takes us in its wake.

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Charlotte’s “Jazz Diva” Tammy Greene Passes Away After Years of Fighting Breast Cancer https://iridiumjazz.com/charlottes-jazz-diva-tammy-greene-passes-away-after-years-of-fighting-breast-cancer/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 00:57:35 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/charlottes-jazz-diva-tammy-greene-passes-away-after-years-of-fighting-breast-cancer/ Tammy Greene, an organizer of jazz and entertainment concerts in Charlotte, has died of metastatic breast cancer. Greene was the owner of Jazz Diva Entertainment and hosted jazz events locally and in the greater Charlotte area. Originally from Philadelphia, she moved to Charlotte to become a professor of finance at Central Piedmont Community College. But […]]]>

Tammy Greene, an organizer of jazz and entertainment concerts in Charlotte, has died of metastatic breast cancer.

Greene was the owner of Jazz Diva Entertainment and hosted jazz events locally and in the greater Charlotte area.

Originally from Philadelphia, she moved to Charlotte to become a professor of finance at Central Piedmont Community College. But at the age of 40, she decided she preferred to pursue a career in promoting jazz events.

When some of Greene’s friends opened a jazz hall, she began to book entertainment for them. And at a time when Charlotte had far fewer options for jazz music than she does today, she came to be known as the “Jazz Diva”.

Greene promoted the Uptown Jazz Festival and produced the Carolina Jazz Concert Series at CPCC and a weekly smooth jazz mixer at Sydney’s in Uptown. She also helped produce the Low Country Jazz Festival in Charleston, SC

Jerry Hopper met Greene 16 years ago while working as a DJ at WSGE radio station (91.7-FM) in Dallas, NC. He said the two often chat about music. Then one day, she recruited him to join her promotion company.

“I met her and she asks me when I was going to come and do things with her,” he recalls.

Hopper said his professional association with Greene lasted 15 years, during which time he worked as a production assistant for Jazz Diva Entertainment. He said his work brought jazz music to Charlotte.

“She was a jazz music lover and tried to bring these cultural events to the area,” he said.

In one of Greene’s last posts on her Facebook page, Oct. 31, she re-shared a post from two years earlier in which she wrote about the physical challenges of cancer treatment.

“I might look normal, but my body is struggling every day … every day,” she wrote. “Today is the last day of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. All the energy around breast cancer is going to slow down considerably… but for me, my fight lasts 365 days a year.

Green ended the post by saying that she was “blessed beyond measure” to have friends who encouraged her.


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Evans / Odamura / Elphick & Visions of Nar (Sydney International Women’s Jazz Festival) https://iridiumjazz.com/evans-odamura-elphick-visions-of-nar-sydney-international-womens-jazz-festival/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 23:31:15 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/evans-odamura-elphick-visions-of-nar-sydney-international-womens-jazz-festival/ What do you get when you combine a koto saxophone, double bass and alto saxophone? The Evans / Odamura / Elphick Trio – one of the most exhilarating jazz concerts you have seen in Australia to date. On Friday night at the Utzon Hall of the Sydney Opera House, koto master Satsuki Odamura joined Australia’s […]]]>

What do you get when you combine a koto saxophone, double bass and alto saxophone? The Evans / Odamura / Elphick Trio – one of the most exhilarating jazz concerts you have seen in Australia to date.

On Friday night at the Utzon Hall of the Sydney Opera House, koto master Satsuki Odamura joined Australia’s most famous and influential saxophonist Dr Sandy Evans and ARIA-winner bassist Steve Elphick, for the first half of a concert featuring an impressive array of Evans. and the compositions of Odamura.

Sandy Evans, Steve Elphick and Satsuki Odamura. Photo © Shane Rozario

Odamura and Elphick have both appeared on Evans’ albums in the past, including Rockpool mirror (Tall Poppies) of 2017, which saw the masterful pieces for the koto, such as His wild spirit (2019) for tenor saxophone, koto and koto bass, and Love is a deeper season (2020) for koto, bass koto and taiko.

In the Utzon room, the trio opened with What destination now?– Evans’ musical essay, exploring a feeling she harbors about the plight of the world after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Odamura bowed before entering her stage space, kneeling beside her 13-string instrument as she plucked the opening notes of the composition – a flash of sound that shocked the audience.

She meandered with Elphick on bass, the pair circling a central motif before Evans entered with a hypnotic passage. His swirling runs displayed his characteristic boldness, and his ability to immediately switch from courage to tenderness was astounding to hear.

She continued her sonic choreography as Odamura threw her arms and fingers around her instrument, sending the melody into a perpetual and memorable climax, as Elphick maintained his drones and reliable octave hops supporting the base of the room.

Already, the opening piece dazzled audiences with its genre flair, as the three legendary musicians sculpted a musical tale of adventure, exuberance and turbulence.

The composition of Elphick and Odamura in a trance, saw a more minimalist interpretation of the possibilities available for the double bass and the two kotos that Odamura had that evening; the 17-string bass koto and the 13-string koto. Elphick explained to the audience that he was interested in examining the characteristics of his instrument with that of Odamura; this piece was less about the explicit narrative, and more about the setting in atmosphere.

There was strength and athleticism in Odamura’s play – watching her change height with her left fingers and her thumb pressing the ropes was akin to seeing the graceful poise of an Olympic fencer.

His majestic approach to musical creation with Elphick and Evans created an atmosphere of solemnity and humility. The addition of the bass bow to the koto complimented Evans’ fierce solo – every note is performed with such care and thoughtfulness.

The trio finished their set with a range of compositions by Evans Rockpool mirror album including Yarrunga Lake, and Colors of Lake Yarrunga.

“The past two years have been a time of change and suffering, uncertainty and unexpected happiness,” Evans said. “For me, I’m just incredibly happy to be here with these amazing musicians, who make my life worth living.”

Evans’ lively personality and charm emanated from every sound she ejected from her saxophone. We heard brilliant trills accompany the cascading swirling sounds of Odamura’s koto, as she moved the bridges of her instrument and deftly moved along the koto’s long frame.

The energy of their performance continued into the second half of the concert, when a quartet of young musicians enchanted the audience with their progressive approach to music inspired by Armenian mythologies.

Zelda Margossian, Adem Yilmaz, Jeremy Rose and Hilary Geddes, Visions of Nar. Photo © Shane Rozario

In a series of world-building pieces, saxophonist Jeremy Rose and pianist Zelda Margossian presented their compositions as part of the ABC’s Fresh Start Fund, with the project, Visions of Nar, named after the goddess of the waters and the ocean – a powerful female force in Armenian mythology.

They were joined on stage by the extraordinary percussionist Adem Yilmaz, a member of Margossian’s own quintet, and this year’s Freedman Jazz Fellow, Hilary Geddes on guitar.

In an hour-long setting, the ensemble painted a vast soundscape of the towering mountains of Armenia and the cheerful surroundings of the vernissage market in the capital, Yerevan.

The ensemble worked cohesively, with each member displaying a high level of awareness of their role in creating the water, thunder and ocean scene in Nar dance, Girl of the seas and Mythical union, all composed by the ethno-jazz and folkloric style of Margossian.

As I sat in the audience, stopped by the vigorous playfulness of the music, I found myself thinking “What is jazz?” “

Exceeding existing limits? The creation of new sounds? The slow, gentle inculcation of sounds the world has yet to hear? Or the feeling of crossing foreign sound heights?

With respect to this group, all of the above. I enjoyed Margossian’s compositions, as her writing distributed the melodic and rhythmic singularity more evenly among all players.

His pieces have allowed each musician to display their own unique voice. Sometimes Rose would play many notes when he didn’t need them, and some high registers were compromised by spitting sounds. But overall, his tone was broad, expansive, and pleasant.

works by Rose, Birth song, Heaven and earth and Smoke and flames were good – with interesting and complex rhythms.

A tight rhythmic foundation was set up by Geddes on guitar and Yilmaz on percussion. The bar changes were initiated flawlessly and supported by a clarity of Margossian sound on the piano.

Sometimes Rose’s sax would cover Geddes’ intricate and sinuous guitar sequences, but it was always a piece that had “… the ability to bring together interesting personalities and cultures,” as Rose explained in presenting the song. ‘one of his pieces.

In the few times we have heard Geddes show off her talents, she has shown her speed and musical wit – someone who is clearly at the top of her instrument. Her self-awareness as a performer and musician as part of an ensemble is amazing.

Margossian’s solos were immersive and swept away in their power and austerity – there was a magnifying pull in her phrasing, and her on-stage connection with Yilmaz was magical to behold. It was as if they were connected by an invisible force, weaving perfectly together.

There is a feeling you get when you witness something remarkable happening in front of you – something called genius. It’s unique, distinct and rare, and you know it the moment you see it – in this case, listen to it. Yilmaz was that genius on Friday night, banging, banging, piercing and banging his collection of percussion instruments, which surrounded him like an astronaut surrounded by their flight control panels, ready to launch into space.

Throughout the concert, his use of the fiberskyn hand drum, cajon, udu drums, thunder drum, bells and maracas was extraordinary to see. His dexterity was fascinating to hear. His sound was pure and real, healthy and enchanting.

The performance evoked a mystical realm of quivering beauty – an area we have been fortunate enough to embrace.

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Racism led to the expulsion of a jazz band from Australia in 1928, according to the author https://iridiumjazz.com/racism-led-to-the-expulsion-of-a-jazz-band-from-australia-in-1928-according-to-the-author/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/racism-led-to-the-expulsion-of-a-jazz-band-from-australia-in-1928-according-to-the-author/ She says a couple were found in a bedroom, but there was evidence the woman was from a police station. Dr O’Connell came across the forgotten incident while researching the arrival of blues music in Australia. A newspaper article from March 31, 1928 reports that “wild scenes of abandonment” took place in the East Melbourne […]]]>

She says a couple were found in a bedroom, but there was evidence the woman was from a police station.

Dr O’Connell came across the forgotten incident while researching the arrival of blues music in Australia.

A newspaper article from March 31, 1928 reports that “wild scenes of abandonment” took place in the East Melbourne apartment.

The group and associated groups have spent nine weeks performing successfully at the Tivoli theaters in Sydney and Melbourne, and at the Green Mill Dance Hall near Melbourne’s Princes Bridge.

It was the era of White Australian politics and Dr O’Connell said authorities had organized the raid with the Truth (which the reporter was present) as a pretext to preserve Australia‘s racial purity and the morals of young white women – issues that raged under the glitz of the Roaring Twenties.

Former Prime Minister Billy Hughes, advocate for a white and British Australia, called the Clay Orchestra “scum” and “pet peeves” and said the Americans would lynch musicians in a similar situation.

The federal government routinely denied entry visas to “Negro” jazz groups and the Australian Musicians’ Union banned “colored” musicians from performing here, but the promoters of the colorful idea have sidestepped this by calling them “black” musicians. ‘theater artists.

Another image of the arrival of the group Sonny Clay's Colored Idea in 1928 in Sydney with a singer in their troupe.

Another image of the arrival of the group Sonny Clay’s Colored Idea in 1928 in Sydney with a singer in their troupe.Credit:Sam Hood Collection, NSW State Library.

Dr O’Connell said that from the day the group arrived in a troupe of African-American artists, performing and dancing at Sydney’s Circular Quay on January 19, 1928, the Commonwealth Investigation Branch, a forerunner of the ‘ASIO, and the police spied on them.

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In the late 1920s, young Australians were freer than they had ever been to leave home, get office jobs, or go dancing. But there was strong resistance from conservatives, as well as enormous angst over interracial sex involving white women and non-white men.

As of the raid, only white women, with the exception of the alleged police informant, were charged – with vagrancy. They were acquitted but were called immoral and reckless in the media, and their reputation was ruined.

Dr O’Connell says Australian culture was the loser after deportation.

In the aftermath of the incident, the government introduced a rigged “character test,” which it said was designed for African-American jazz musicians to fail, and which was not lifted until 1954. , after which big stars such as Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald were able to travel.

The white Australian policy persisted until 1973.

Dr O’Connell said history has modern parallels, such as governments continuing to “fabricate racial scandals and crises for political ends, such as the beating of African gangs.”

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Ming Smith on jazz, spirituality and how photography saved it https://iridiumjazz.com/ming-smith-on-jazz-spirituality-and-how-photography-saved-it/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 13:42:29 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/ming-smith-on-jazz-spirituality-and-how-photography-saved-it/ This story originally appeared in i-D’s The Darker Issue, no. 365, Winter 2021. Order your copy here. Ming Smith is the first African-American female photographer to have her work acquired by the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She graduated from Howard University with a major in microbiology and came to New York City […]]]>

This story originally appeared in i-D’s The Darker Issue, no. 365, Winter 2021. Order your copy here.

Ming Smith is the first African-American female photographer to have her work acquired by the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She graduated from Howard University with a major in microbiology and came to New York City to be an artist and model as a means of supporting herself. In his photography, Smith draws his inspiration from jazz, spirituality and the daily creativity of black life. She is known for her images of Sun Ra, Randy Weston, Pharoah Sanders, Betty Carter and other jazz musicians who were the main founders of Afro-Futurism and the New York jazz scene.

Ming Smith photographed by Mario Sorrenti

Ming, it’s great to talk to you. I wonder if we can start by talking about the beginnings of your artistic practice and your childhood in Columbus, Ohio.
I felt isolated in Columbus in many ways, even though people said my house was magical when they came. We had a lot of paintings. I had magazines. I had visual material around me. My father made sculptures and my mother did embroidery. It was just a way of life for me to look and see. I was mostly influenced by painting. I started looking at paintings at a young age, not so much at photographers. I didn’t think I would consider photography an art form. But I have always been aware of the pain that people go through within my family and even with my friends. I have always been, from an early age, an observer as an artist.

Do you think there is a relationship between your early interest in painting and some of your works in which you paint on the photographs themselves?
I think my best work is when the photography itself looks like a painting, when the photography becomes like a painting with light.

Were you interested in painting as an artistic practice? Or work in other mediums like cinema? Your photographs have such a movement for them.
Quite honestly, I think I mostly learned how to shoot in black and white while watching movies. I was going to every movie theater when I came to New York in the 1970s. I was going to movie theaters one after the other.

I am also a dancer. I spend as much time dancing as I do photographing. I have always been inspired by Katherine Dunham and have traveled to different parts of the African Diaspora. I was inspired by the placement of weapons in different African dances, rhythms, spirituality, ceremonies, folklore.

When I first saw ballet dancers in Ohio growing up, I didn’t even have the right words to describe it. Even when I arrived in New York City, one of the reasons I wanted to come was to take dance lessons. I ran away so I could take dance lessons in New York.

Did you run away?
Yes. The act of running away from conventional life to live the life of an artist was an act of commitment for me because I ran away from something that was meant to be safe for something that was beyond my imagination.

Portrait of Ming Smith wearing a black trench coat and hoops.

Ming Smith photographed by Mario Sorrenti

Once you moved to New York, what were the major advancements in your job?
When I first moved to New York City, I wasn’t photographing as much because I was visiting different dance studios. I walked in and saw something new. There was a whole world around dance and jazz that I was a part of. For me, jazz is America. It is the first major form of musical art to originate in America. It is the music of black Americans. It is an invention and a serious concept that encompasses the struggle of black Americans from blues to gospel, spiritual and Afro-Futurism. For me, it’s alpha-omega. An enigma and omniscient.

But I knew I had to find my own voice in photography. I think my breakthrough came when I started to perfect my presence by breathing. I do circular breathing, a system of breathing patterns that allows a musician to maintain notes without interruption. It allowed me to find my voice, which I call artistic blur and Arthur Jafa called blur. It allows me to capture more than what we know to be present in the physical world.

Spirituality also comes up often in your work.
Arthur Jafa also talks about the spirit all the time. In his films, people take the spirit. I had a friend who attended the Catholic Church and I went with her sometimes. I thought it was so mysterious. They have incense, lights, smoke, windows; you have to get down on your knees, get up, open your mouth and take the flesh. Everything is very dramatic. It was another sense of beauty.

When I was young, my grandfather took me to church, and I saw people ‘acquire the spirit’. I was terrified because I was so shy. I was afraid that if I had the mind everyone would look at me and I would be totally out of control. Now even with my photography I can feel the spirit but it allows me to control it. Photography is like an intermediary. You have to be able to enter into yourself, to be with yourself while looking at something outside yourself.

It reminds me of what you said before photography saved you.
I would say photography saved me in that it gave me a life of honesty. I was such a shy person but photography allowed me to be present while hiding myself. I probably wouldn’t have come out anywhere in New York if I hadn’t filmed.

Do you think photography allows you, or helps you, to believe in a certain way?
Seeing is believing. Everything is intuition, connection to the higher power. I think it’s in the natural disposition of blacks to be creators.

I agree with you but what do you mean by that? Can you say more?
We had to create ways to survive and it becomes a daily act of creation. Even for me, there is still a conflict. To take the back seat or not to take the back seat? How can I pay the bills? How can I juggle this? How do I get my baby to the babysitter and be at work at 10 a.m.? How do I stretch that five dollar bill? You have to do it and you have to be creative. There is no other way.

Before you let go, can you tell me what are you currently working on?
Right now I have a museum exhibit in Texas. I am focusing on this. I’m also working on a book called August Moon. I started in the ’90s when I hopped on the Greyhound Bus to visit August Wilson’s hometown of Pittsburg, PA, to photograph some of the sites featured in his plays. I am in the process of editing it and it should be released next year.

Anok Yai wears a sequined bodysuit, boots and guitar next to makeup table and mirror

Anok Yai photographed by Ming Smith

Anok Yai wears a sequined bodysuit next to a make-up table and a mirror

Anok Yai photographed by Ming Smith

Anok Yai wears black hoodie and cat ears next to garage door

Anok Yai photographed by Ming Smith

Anok Yai wears a white dress as she stands in front of a wall

Anok Yai photographed by Ming Smith

Anok Yai wears a white dress as she stands in a parking lot

Anok Yai photographed by Ming Smith

anok Yai wears a quilted coat and gladiator heels as she walks the road

Anok Yai photographed by Ming Smith

Credits


Photographs by Ming Smith

Photography Mario Sorrenti
Fashion Alastair McKimm
Bob Hair Recine
Kanako Takase make-up at Streeters with Addiction Beauty
Nail Technician Honey at Exposure NY with Smith & Cult
Photo assistance Kotaro Kawashima and Javier Villegas
Digital Technician Chad Meyer
Fashion Aid Milton Dixon III and Casey Conrad
Martin Keehn suit
Kazuhide Katahira hair aid
Kuma makeup aid
Production Katie Fash, Layla Néméjanski and Steve Sutton
Production assistance William Cipos
Casting director Samuel Ellis Scheinman for DMCASTING

Photographs of Anok Yai

Ming Smith Photography
Fashion Sydney Rose Thomas
Nikki Nelms hair using Bronner Bros Pump It Up Gold
Make-up Marcelo Gutierrez with Chanel Beauty
Nail Technician Krysty Williams at Exposure NY with Zoya
Photography assistance Paula-Andrea Poulsen and Nuvany David
Digital technician Michel Oscar Monegro
Fashion Aid Sofia Amaral
ProductionJessica Tjeng
Casting director Samuel Ellis Scheinman for DMCASTING
Model Anok Yai at Next


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Tamara Murphy: 5 tunes to listen to – Specials https://iridiumjazz.com/tamara-murphy-5-tunes-to-listen-to-specials/ https://iridiumjazz.com/tamara-murphy-5-tunes-to-listen-to-specials/#respond Sun, 31 Oct 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/tamara-murphy-5-tunes-to-listen-to-specials/ Bassist and Songwriter Tamara Murphy joins us for Ausmusic Month as Artist in Residence on ABC Jazz! During the month of November, she will be sharing the music she loves from Australia and beyond. Bass player Tamara murphy is a major figure in the Melbourne jazz scene. She won the first Young Elder of Jazz […]]]>

Bassist and Songwriter Tamara Murphy joins us for Ausmusic Month as Artist in Residence on ABC Jazz! During the month of November, she will be sharing the music she loves from Australia and beyond.

Bass player Tamara murphy is a major figure in the Melbourne jazz scene. She won the first Young Elder of Jazz Commission at the Melbourne International Jazz Festival in 2011 and has led her own groups such as Murphy’s Law and Spirograph studies – both of which have released a number of albums. She was also part of the longtime trio with Andrea Keller and the end Allan Browne and collaborated with groups like the Fran swinn Trio, Stone flower and Nat Bartsch‘s Sextet to name a few.

Find Tamara every day at 2 p.m. on ABC Jazz with the music that shaped her career. Here are five takeaways from the series:

1. When Tamara was growing up she had a pretty cheap bass: she kept telling herself that if Ray Brown played it it would still sound like Ray Brown, hence a Ray Brown plectrum to get things going!

2. In 1998, she went to see necks – but they canceled their meeting in Melbourne so she went to Sydney with a friend in 1998, attending the recording of their live album Piano Bass Drums. She estimates that you can probably hear her screaming with the audience about two-thirds of the way through the album’s start!

3. Tamara believes the singer Gian slater is so original in its approach that “she changed the vocal landscape of this country“.

4. She spent 14 years playing with the drummer Allan Browne from whom she learned so much, learning everything from swing to Allan’s good sense of humor!

5. She always associates being a teenager with Vince jones who she grew up listening to in the ’80s and’ 90s, and loves how these early LPs are so finely crafted.


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Booming Canadian jazz artist with Cape Breton roots arrives in a ‘second home’ to perform https://iridiumjazz.com/booming-canadian-jazz-artist-with-cape-breton-roots-arrives-in-a-second-home-to-perform/ https://iridiumjazz.com/booming-canadian-jazz-artist-with-cape-breton-roots-arrives-in-a-second-home-to-perform/#respond Wed, 27 Oct 2021 14:43:57 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/booming-canadian-jazz-artist-with-cape-breton-roots-arrives-in-a-second-home-to-perform/ SYDNEY, NS – When she was about seven years old, Virginia MacDonald remembers her parents giving her a choice of musical instruments. “I have this memory of being in my father’s studio and he said that we are at the point where we are going to choose an instrument so that you can continue the […]]]>

SYDNEY, NS – When she was about seven years old, Virginia MacDonald remembers her parents giving her a choice of musical instruments.

“I have this memory of being in my father’s studio and he said that we are at the point where we are going to choose an instrument so that you can continue the lessons and so he has arranged all these different instruments”, a MacDonald said in a recent telephone interview from his home in Toronto. “He had a saxophone, he had a flute, I think there was a keyboard and then there was a clarinet and from what my parents say my eyes just lit up when I saw the clarinet. .

“I thought it was the coolest instrument, for some reason. And I said, “that one, that one.”

Kirk MacDonald of New Waterford, left, performs with his daughter Virginia MacDonald at an Ontario venue. She travels to Nova Scotia in early November for appearances in Antigonish, Sydney and Halifax. – Contributed

MacDonald, 27, is the daughter of New Waterford-born saxophonist Kirk MacDonald, who is widely regarded as one of the best players in the country. While doubling on the saxophone, MacDonald knew from an early age that the clarinet would be her greatest asset.

“Part of me thinks I was a bit of a rebel – I didn’t want to play the same instrument as my father,” she said. “I just thought it was the instrument I wanted to express my voice on.”


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Although popular in the 1930s and 1940s, the clarinet is not an instrument often heard in jazz today, but MacDonald is determined to change that. Thanks to 20 years of practice and performance, its sweet sound is sure to seduce. She is a recipient of the 2019 Stingray Music Rising Star Award and winner of the first prize of the 2020 Corona International Clarinet Competition.

His first CD with original compositions is due out in 2022.

“I practiced a lot,” she says. “A lot of my musical background was listening to players on different instruments, so I would listen to a lot of trumpeters or bugle players and try to emulate the sound they got on the clarinet. And I listened to a lot of singers and I tried to bring some of what they were doing, to bring some of that sweetness, that quality of sound, to the clarinet as well. Trying to tap into as wide a network of resources as I can and making sure I listen to everything – for me, that’s what really shaped my playing on the instrument.

Clarinetist Virginia MacDonald is shown performing in a video.  - Contributed
Clarinetist Virginia MacDonald is shown performing in a video. – Contributed

MacDonald will be in Nova Scotia in November, first conducting master classes at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, then performing in Sydney on November 6 at the Sacred Heart Downtown with other members of his quartet – Lee -Jung Choi (piano), Paul Rushka (bass) and Tom Roach (drums). Sydney guitarist Joe Waye will also join them for a few numbers.

Tickets are $ 75 for the 6:30 pm dinner and 7:30 pm show. To purchase tickets, visit Sacredheartdowntown.com or call 902-578-2898.

She also has two appearances in Halifax, with the William Paynter Quartet at the Obladee Wine Bar on Wednesday November 3 and with her own trio at the Halifax Central Library on Tuesday November 9 as part of the Canadian Online Jazz Festival, a co-performance with the Halifax Jazz Festival, live on YouTube at 7:30 p.m.

In addition to performing at her concerts, she is also looking forward to returning to Cape Breton. MacDonald returns to Cape Breton usually during the summer just about every year of her life and it is a special time that she looks forward to.

“It’s one of my favorite places in this world. It will always feel like a second home to me. That’s where my dad’s family comes from, so just coming over to visit everyone is always like coming home.

Elizabeth Patterson is a cultural reporter for the Cape Breton Post.


Virginia MacDonald – High High Low Low


Kirk MacDonald / Virginia MacDonald Duo


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Robert ‘Bob’ Rudolph, jazz trombonist, died at 82 https://iridiumjazz.com/robert-bob-rudolph-jazz-trombonist-died-at-82/ https://iridiumjazz.com/robert-bob-rudolph-jazz-trombonist-died-at-82/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 15:43:08 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/robert-bob-rudolph-jazz-trombonist-died-at-82/ Rudolph, who was born July 15, 1939, struggled with an addiction problem from the 1980s and that lasted until the turn of the century. When he got sober he was an addiction counselor in Nashville, working with many music artists and professionals in the music industry and others, including stays in Cumberland Heights and the […]]]>

Rudolph, who was born July 15, 1939, struggled with an addiction problem from the 1980s and that lasted until the turn of the century. When he got sober he was an addiction counselor in Nashville, working with many music artists and professionals in the music industry and others, including stays in Cumberland Heights and the Nashville Metro Drug System. Court and Jail, according to his son John, who reports he was awarded the Middle Tennessee Counselor of the Year and the State of Tennessee Counselor of the Year.

By the time John Rudolph was 13, his father had already taken him to see more than 100 artist exhibitions, the son reports. “It was an encyclopedia of jazz knowledge, he was fascinated by space and airplanes, loved art, Dali and his granddaughter,” his son said. Billboard. He also reported that his father had one last moment of notoriety when he was charged with simple possession of marijuana for a joint he smuggled into his retirement home to help him cope with ailments. chronic back pain. The charges were then dismissed.

Rudolph is survived by his two sons, John and Robert Rudolph of Washington DC; and his good friends to the end, Chicago trombonist Frank Tesinsky, who founded the Chicago Public School Brass Program; and Russ Bach (Brumbach), former president of EMI Distribution. The family asks if any readers have notes on Bob for the family or would like to attend a virtual memorial service, please email IMissBobJazz@gmail.com.


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Sydney International Women’s Jazz Festival announces 2021 program https://iridiumjazz.com/sydney-international-womens-jazz-festival-announces-2021-program/ https://iridiumjazz.com/sydney-international-womens-jazz-festival-announces-2021-program/#respond Thu, 21 Oct 2021 00:10:54 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/sydney-international-womens-jazz-festival-announces-2021-program/ The Sydney International Women’s Jazz Festival (SIWJF) announced the programming of its 2021 festival, which will take place over 10 days from November 12 to 21. As the border closures deprived the festival of some of its international flair for the second year in a row, the diversity and breadth of communities and musical cultures […]]]>

The Sydney International Women’s Jazz Festival (SIWJF) announced the programming of its 2021 festival, which will take place over 10 days from November 12 to 21. As the border closures deprived the festival of some of its international flair for the second year in a row, the diversity and breadth of communities and musical cultures on display will give audiences a taste of jazz from around the world. .

“We are delighted that the 2021 festival is taking place,” said co-artistic directors Zoe Hauptmann and Peter Rechniewski. “Jazz is an ideal medium for seated and socially distanced environments. “

“This year offers music lovers a unique opportunity to discover the magic and intimacy of jazz. Few Australian musicians have been able to perform live since the onset of the coronavirus, and these artists are thrilled to perform in front of audiences at this year’s festival. “

The festival will take place in several venues, including the Utzon Hall at the Sydney Opera House, and of course Foundry616, Sydney’s long-standing jazz club in the heart of Ultimo. There will also be a pop-up festival bar, Ruby’s, at the Joynton Avenue Creative Center in Zetland near Green Square, as well as a special online interview and performance film with Ellen Kirkwood.

The highlight of this year’s festival is a huge double-poster on Friday, November 19 in the Utzon Hall. The word “icon” is used a lot these days, but if anyone ever deserved it, it would be Dr Sandy Evans. Over a long and celebrated career, the saxophonist and composer has been recognized and celebrated for her artistry, her advocacy for female musicians and her explorations of intercultural music. In a rehearsal of last year’s SIWJF closing gala, Evans will perform in a trio with Japanese koto master Satsuki Odamura and the award-winning ARIA bassist Steve elphick. Their performance at last year’s festival received rave reviews, and so it is with great excitement that we receive a sequel.

The second strip of this double bill is Visions of Nar, a supergroup featuring some of the country’s top musicians from a younger generation: pianist Zela Margossian, saxophonist Jeremy rose, 2021 Freedman Jazz Fellow guitarist Hilary geddes and percussionist Adem Yilmaz. Nar is the Armenian goddess of water, sea and rain, which gives you an idea of ​​the kaleidoscopic journey through folk tunes, jazz, and fresh compositions that this quartet will take you on a journey. These two incredible ensembles on display is a night you can’t miss.

The festival’s only online event – and what a joy to say after two years of Zoom festivals – is a two-part online series exploring [A]part, Ellen kirkwoodThe 2017 four-part sequel which was performed and recorded by Sirens Big Band with Sandy Evans, Andrea Keller and Gian Slater. The extraordinarily ambitious album tackles burning political and social issues, including climate change and the refugee crisis, through a fusion of jazz, rock, Afro-Cuban and contemporary classic. This online event features interviews with Kirkwood, Evans, and Sirens frontman Jessica Dunn, exploring how the recording went. After the discussion, watch the first concert by [A]part filmed by videographer and visual projectionist Cleo Mees.

Singer Virna Sanzone opens the festival on Friday November 12 with a program celebrating its Italian heritage. Performing as a quartet, with Matt McMahon (piano), Jonathan Zwartz (bass) and Tim Firth (drums), Sanzone will perform his interpretation of Italian and English songs, performed outdoors at Ruby’s.

The party continues at Ruby’s the next day with Brass on the grass, a free event featuring an outfit influenced by New Orleans Queen Porter Stomp and the 343 Marching Band. An event for all ages, the Sydneysiders will have the chance to practice their newly honed picnic skills for a Saturday afternoon on the lawn.

That night, the action moves to Foundry616, which is the location at the heart of this year’s festival, hosting performances by the singer. Kate wadey, bossa nova artist Anna hall and the regulars of the Foundry Mingus among us, in a special performance featuring the emerging saxophonist Tessie Overmyer alongside award-winning bassist Jann Rutherford, Hannah james, in an expanded lineup for the beloved big band.

Pharos. Image provided.

Also at the foundry is Pharos, an all-female ensemble made up of a six-piece brass section and a four-piece rhythm section, all with extensive experience in improvisation, exploring the limits of modern big band jazz. In this performance, they present the work of Sophie Min, recipient of the APRA Emerging Composers Mentorship 2020. Minn studied with legendary composer / pianist Barney McAll to develop this new work.

The closing night of the festival, also at Foundry, features a Zambian / British singer Major Zulu. Present at festivals around the world including SXSW, Glastonbury and CMJ in New York, she has performed with Amy Winehouse, Norah Jones, Earth, Wind & Fire and has served as lead singer for Basement Jaxx’s, winner of a Grammy award. Everybody. Having lived and worked in London, Paris and the United States, Major Zulu draws upon all that cosmopolitan cool in his performances.


More information available on the SIWJF website.

Marquee TV: get 3 months for the price of 1


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Major Zulu to close 2021 Sydney International Women’s Jazz Festival https://iridiumjazz.com/major-zulu-to-close-2021-sydney-international-womens-jazz-festival/ https://iridiumjazz.com/major-zulu-to-close-2021-sydney-international-womens-jazz-festival/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 09:35:45 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/major-zulu-to-close-2021-sydney-international-womens-jazz-festival/ Sydney-based Zambian / British soul and jazz singer Major Zulu will close the Sydney International Women’s Jazz Festival 2021 on Sunday, November 21 at Foundry 616. Tickets are on sale from today. For ten days, from November 12 to 21, SIWJF 2021 welcomes the return of live music to Sydney and highlights the exceptional contribution […]]]>

Sydney-based Zambian / British soul and jazz singer Major Zulu will close the Sydney International Women’s Jazz Festival 2021 on Sunday, November 21 at Foundry 616.

Tickets are on sale from today. For ten days, from November 12 to 21, SIWJF 2021 welcomes the return of live music to Sydney and highlights the exceptional contribution women make to jazz.

Major Zulu will release their second single Broken, co-written by Zulu and A.Morrison, available Friday, December 3, 2021 on all major streaming platforms. Broken talks about love and addiction. Zulu explores her own addictions to loving the wrong type of men and her denial of the role she plays in dysfunctional relationships. had to face a lot of pain “

Broken was recorded at Sydney’s FreeEnergy Studios with some of Sydney’s best musicians. “To get a sound that truly represents my influences, I selected jazz and soul musicians from various backgrounds including London drummer Ian Mussington, Sri Lankan pianist Roshan Kumarag, Lebanese trumpeter Charles Casson, bassist Gervais Koffi from Abidjan West Africa and his son, child prodigy guitarist Yannick Koffi, whom Zulu met playing in the street. “

Broken follows the release in May 2021 of his debut single Tryin ‘Times, released as racial tensions were high over the injustice of George Floyd. “My father was a racist activist, one of the pioneers of democracy in Zambia. As a black man he was not allowed to wear shoes or read books. He became a successful engineer. . ” YouTubeMajorZuluTryin’Times

Born and raised in Zambia, it was in London, Paris and the United States, where her career took off. Major Zulu has performed alongside Amy Winehouse, Norah Jones, Earth Wind and Fire and America and she performed the lead singer role for Basement Jaxx’s Grammy Award-winning album Everybody. She has performed in numerous international festivals, South By South West (United States), Glastonbury (United Kingdom) and CMJ-New York City (United States).

“My singing style is rooted in blues and gospel music.” Zulu said. “I was exposed to a lot of jazz and blues music growing up. My uncle was a jazz musician and my dad was a huge fan of Louis Armstrong and Frank Sinatra.” Zulu speaks and sings in French and English and she is appeared in the French film ‘Jamais Contente’ by director Emelie Deleuze.


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