Australia – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 14:42:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iridiumjazz.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default1-1.png Australia – Iridium Jazz http://iridiumjazz.com/ 32 32 Tal Cohen Presents Jewish Jazz https://iridiumjazz.com/tal-cohen-presents-jewish-jazz/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 14:42:40 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/tal-cohen-presents-jewish-jazz/ After playing around the world, Tal Cohen introduces a new set of music to Arts Garage influenced by his childhood in Israel. Expect infectious grooves meeting traditional Israeli folk music and traditional jazz meeting traditional klezmer music. Biography of the performer: Tal Cohen is a Grammy-winning pianist from Israel who has received much acclaim during […]]]>

After playing around the world, Tal Cohen introduces a new set of music to Arts Garage influenced by his childhood in Israel. Expect infectious grooves meeting traditional Israeli folk music and traditional jazz meeting traditional klezmer music.

Biography of the performer:

Tal Cohen is a Grammy-winning pianist from Israel who has received much acclaim during his young career. He won the Barry Harris National Piano Competition and was awarded the prestigious Freedman Fellowship at the Sydney Opera House. His latest album Gentle Giants, featuring jazz legends Robert Hurst and Greg Osby, received 4 stars from Downbeat magazine and was recognized as one of the best jazz albums of 2018. Tal has performed worldwide with Terence Blanchard, Greg Osby, Ignacio Berroa and Joe Lovano, and he has performed at numerous festivals such as Jazzbez Jazz Festival (Ukraine), Detroit Jazz Festival (USA), Melbourne Jazz Festival (Australia), the Sopot Jazz Festival (Poland) and others. Cohen has become one of the most sought after pianists with his unique blend of Jewish melodies, traditional jazz harmony and an impeccable rhythmic palette forging an unforgettable path.

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Why Jazz Drummer Eric Harland of Trio Grande 2.0 Had to Go to Bible School https://iridiumjazz.com/why-jazz-drummer-eric-harland-of-trio-grande-2-0-had-to-go-to-bible-school/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/why-jazz-drummer-eric-harland-of-trio-grande-2-0-had-to-go-to-bible-school/ Of all the reasons for dropping out of music school, Eric Harland’s has to be among the strangest. There he was at the prestigious Manhattan School of Music on a full scholarship, his career as a jazz drummer taking off like a rocket, and the notoriously hard-to-please great singer Betty Carter among those who hired […]]]>

Of all the reasons for dropping out of music school, Eric Harland’s has to be among the strangest. There he was at the prestigious Manhattan School of Music on a full scholarship, his career as a jazz drummer taking off like a rocket, and the notoriously hard-to-please great singer Betty Carter among those who hired him. But none of that mattered to Harland’s mother in Texas. She was thinking long term. Very long term. She had an invincible fear for the health of her eternal soul.

“I come from a very religious family,” Harland explains, “and it was really hard for me to enjoy being in college, because my mom was so worried that I was doing something wrong, or something against God… I was so far from home, and she used to have this control over the family, and knowing where everyone was and what everyone was doing.

Eric Harland: “There is nothing wrong with being afraid. All you have to do is do your best.
Credit:Goffredo Loertscher

His unorthodox solution was to return to Houston. “What I decided to do was go to theological school because in order to be able to have a legitimate conversation with my mother, if I didn’t have the Bible knowledge, there was no way to make him understand where I came from,” he explains. “And going to theology school really taught me compassion. It was the first time I realized that there was something bigger than just being an artist and allowing that part of me to be there.

Harland had played in church as a child, and now for about eight months he returned there while pursuing these new studies, and found that the beauty of certain theological concepts changed his approach to music: made it more collegial and less preoccupied with what he had to say.

He admits that he could well have arrived at the same place by studying philosophy rather than theology: “But without studying something that is exponentially bigger than oneself, I feel that it is difficult to surrender to something that’s going to be bigger at the bandstand. It helps you grow in so many ways.

After jumping the hurdle of his mother’s fear, he relaunched his meteoric career – until 9/11 wiped out the New York jazz scene in 2001. A planned tour with trumpeter Terence Blanchard was canceled , and Harland and his wife, who had just had a four-year-old baby. days before the calamity, decided to leave New York. The first gig he could get after the dust settled was to play weekend jam sessions at the Blue Note – meager pay for a trek from Pennsylvania.

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The world is on wheels, however, and illustrious saxophonist Charles Lloyd heard one such jam session and invited Harland to join his quartet. Famous players associated with Lloyd’s long history filled Harland with fear and doubt, but how could he say no? “That’s another beautiful thing,” he said. “There is nothing wrong with being afraid. All you have to do is do your best… I just had to be humble, listen, receive guidance and just believe that everything was going to be okay.

It was because now Harland has been riding with Lloyd for 20 years – almost half of his life. When he performed at an undeadened City Recital Hall with Lloyd’s Greek Project in 2014, his ability to make music burn in a whisper shone through. It’s a skill he learned from his first teacher around the age of six – a skill he thinks too few drummers fully assimilate.

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He was living the New York jazz life, then COVID and a baby changed everything https://iridiumjazz.com/he-was-living-the-new-york-jazz-life-then-covid-and-a-baby-changed-everything/ Tue, 31 May 2022 03:54:48 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/he-was-living-the-new-york-jazz-life-then-covid-and-a-baby-changed-everything/ 2020 was shaping up to be an exceptionally good year for Will Vinson. The British saxophonist was marking his 21st year in New York, where he had built a strong reputation on that city’s burgeoning jazz scene as a beloved sideman and adventurous frontman. He had just released a superb new album (pairing his saxophone […]]]>

2020 was shaping up to be an exceptionally good year for Will Vinson. The British saxophonist was marking his 21st year in New York, where he had built a strong reputation on that city’s burgeoning jazz scene as a beloved sideman and adventurous frontman. He had just released a superb new album (pairing his saxophone with five different rhythm sections) and had recently recorded with an all-star band called Trio Grande.

When the pandemic hit New York, Vinson and his heavily pregnant wife (Australian singer Jo Lawry) packed up their apartment and 20 hours later were on a plane to Adelaide, Lawry’s hometown. It was meant to be a temporary relocation, “until this whole (pandemic) blows up,” Vinson says with a sad laugh.

Saxophonist Will Vinson.

Two years later, they are based in Sydney. Lawry, a jazz-trained singer and longtime member of Sting’s band, is on staff at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, where Vinson also teaches. Both plan to resume recording and touring overseas, but have re-evaluated their priorities.

“A lot of what I do as a musician – and Jo too, before we had kids – has been travelling; being away from home for long periods of time. So now, after spending two years together as a family, it’s a little strange to think of traveling again. Jo and I are going to take turns later this year. But coming out of this (pandemic), we will have to find a balance. »

One of the projects Vinson is set to revive is Trio Grande, which originally featured Mexican-American drummer Antonio Sanchez and Israeli-born guitarist Gilad Hekselman. The three – all with strong musical identities – met in New York at Vinson’s invitation, eager to explore a bassless trio format. Hekselman’s ability to create endless textures with an arsenal of effects made him the perfect guitarist for the project, and Sanchez added guaranteed fireworks.

Trio Grande’s self-titled album was released to wide acclaim in late 2020, but the band went into pandemic hibernation. Once the borders started to reopen, Sanchez had wall-to-wall bookings with his own projects.

Vinson and Hekselman have found a new drummer – or rather two drummers (both American). Trio Grande 2.0 will tour Europe in November with Nate Wood on board. But for three shows in Australia, they have Eric Harland, one of the most creative and in-demand drummers in jazz today. Harland has toured here extensively with different bands (most recently with saxophonist Charles Lloyd) and, as Vinson puts it, he becomes an “indispensable part” of every ensemble he plays with.

Trio Grande “2.0” with drummer Eric Harland.

Trio Grande “2.0” with drummer Eric Harland.

“Eric’s sound on drums is unique,” Vinson said. “He’s been on hundreds of records and he’s got a lot of dedicated fans – myself included – who can instantly recognize him by his sound. When you play with him, there’s always a spontaneity and a playfulness, and a real sense of interaction.

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Orange Winter Jazz Festival Limelight Guide https://iridiumjazz.com/orange-winter-jazz-festival-limelight-guide/ Mon, 30 May 2022 23:18:26 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/orange-winter-jazz-festival-limelight-guide/ The first-ever Orange Winter Jazz Festival takes hold of the scenic NSW town over the June long weekend, with some of Australia’s biggest names in jazz and stars of the local scene giving over 50 performances across eight venues. The Zela Margossian Quintet: (LR) Alexander Inman-Hislop, Stuart Vandegraaff, Zela Margossian, Adem Yilmaz and Jacques Emery. […]]]>

The first-ever Orange Winter Jazz Festival takes hold of the scenic NSW town over the June long weekend, with some of Australia’s biggest names in jazz and stars of the local scene giving over 50 performances across eight venues.

The Zela Margossian Quintet: from left to right, Alexander Inman-Hislop, Stuart Vandegraaff, Zela Margossian, Adem Yilmaz and Jacques Emery.

The Zela Margossian Quintet: (LR) Alexander Inman-Hislop, Stuart Vandegraaff, Zela Margossian, Adem Yilmaz and Jacques Emery. Image © Lachlan R Dale.

The lineup was put together by Zoe Hauptmann of SIMA (Sydney Improvised Music Association) and Paul Kelly – no, not that one, or that one, or that one, or that one! – president of Jam Orange, a non-profit association dedicated to supporting music in the orange region. But with so many great shows to choose from, associate editor Hugh Robertson picked his picks from the stacked lineup.

Live and local at the Royal Hotel
One of the most charming elements of the Orange Winter Jazz Festival is its celebration of artists from Orange and the surrounding area, from local performing bands to established touring artists who call the area home. The iconic Royal Hotel is the perfect place to listen to the selection of the local scene, with shows playing all weekend from Friday evening, and open until at least 10.30am every festival night.
June 10-12 until late, The Royal Hotel

Hilary Geddes Quartet
Hilary Geddes is a young guitarist whose star is beaming positively across the firmament right now, hot on the heels of a massive 2021 that included her quartet’s debut album on ABC Jazz and was named a Freedman Jazz Fellow last October. Geddes’ music reflects his approach to band conducting – warm, open, collaborative and constantly seeking more – and his quartet, featuring Matthew Harris (piano), Maximillian Alduca (double bass) and Alexander Inman-Hislop (drums). ), are the ideal collaborators of this brilliant young guitarist. Highlighting his versatility, Geddes also stars in Visions of Nar, performing on the Sunday of the festival.
June 11, 12 p.m., Baptist Church

This World (LR, Hamish Stuart, Mike Nock, Jonathan Zwartz, Julien Wilson).

This World (LR, Hamish Stuart, Mike Nock, Jonathan Zwartz, Julien Wilson). Photo © Anthony Browell.

This world
This new band of pianist Mike Nock, bassist Jonathan Zwartz, tenor saxophonist Julien Wilson and drummer Hamish Stuart released their debut album in 2019, and have since followed up with a second. Both on record and live, their music is vibrant and varied, with the four members sharing songwriting and conducting duties in a triumph of egalitarianism. As Eric Myers wrote in a recent review, “The band’s music, as much as that of any comparable quartet in Australia that I know, tends to embody contemporary jazz. Their music is not just a celebration of a past genre, but is well in the present.
June 11, 5:15 p.m., Orange Conservatorium & June 12, 3:30 p.m., Holy Trinity Church

The vampires
The Vampires may have started at the Sydney Conservatorium, but with saxophonist Jeremy Rose, trumpeter Nick Garbett, drummer Alex Masso and bassist Mike Majkowski now residing in various remote corners of the globe, these performances at Orange mark rare gigs on Terra Australia. But for a band that draws inspiration from its travels around the world, this separation should strengthen the grooves. Already nominated for an ARIA Award and an AIR Award, a finalist at the Australian Jazz Bell Awards, and the first instrumental act to be shortlisted for the Australian Music Prize, they are a serious band that is paving the way for a new generation of Australian musicians. .
June 11, 7:45 p.m. & June 12, 7 p.m., The Uniting Church

Eishan set
Although built around a core line-up of tar player Hamed Sadeghi, Michael Avgenicos on saxophone, Pedram Layegh on guitar, Adem Yilmaz on drums and Maximillian Alduca on double bass, Eishan Ensemble often relies on guest artists for complement his sound – ensuring that no two gigs are ever the same. Interpret Sadeghi’s original compositions that straddle contemporary jazz and his Persian origin, a mixture that limelight Critic Harriet Cunningham described it as a “welded construction of limitless invention” in her review of their 2021 Sydney Opera House show.
June 12, 4:15 p.m., The Uniting Church

Andrea Keller (Photo from the artist's website) and Dr. Sandy Evans (Photo © Karen Steains).

Andrea Keller (Photo from the artist’s website) and Dr. Sandy Evans (Photo © Karen Steains).

Andrea Keller and Sandy Evans
Two of Australia’s greatest jazz citizens – composers, performers, collaborators and teachers – join forces for a rare and thrilling duo performance. Saxophonist Sandy Evans has led the charge in Australian jazz since the 1980s, performing in countless ensembles and with a list of collaborations that reads like a Who is who Australian jazz. Pianist Andrea Keller is an equally generous and enthusiastic collaborator as well as a virtuoso pianist of the classical and jazz repertoire. This special performance, with the two playing each other’s compositions, is absolutely not to be missed.
June 11, 2:15 p.m., The Uniting Church

Visions of Nar & Zela Margossian Quintet
Pianist Zela Margossian transcends genres, her music drawing on a wide range of influences from jazz and classical to her Armenian roots and her studies in Lebanon and Sydney. It all makes for a heady brew that can’t be contained by one genre, or even one ensemble – and so Margossian performs at the Orange Winter Jazz Festival in both his own Zela Margossian Quintet and Visions of Nar, which also includes the saxophonist Jeremy Rose, guitarist Hilary Geddes and percussionist Adem Yilmaz. Both concerts are rich in fascinating rhythms, sounds and styles; both could almost be too much of a good thing – almost.
June 11, 2:30 p.m. (Visions de Nar) & June 12, 7 p.m. (Zela Margossian Quintet), Orange Conservatorium


The Orange Winter Jazz Festival takes place from June 10 to 12, 2022. More information and tickets available here.

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Review: Shaggy and Sting captivate New York’s Blue Note Jazz Club https://iridiumjazz.com/review-shaggy-and-sting-captivate-new-yorks-blue-note-jazz-club/ Thu, 26 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/review-shaggy-and-sting-captivate-new-yorks-blue-note-jazz-club/ Shaggy and Sting at the Blue Note Jazz Club in New York. Photo credit: Herman Canosa On Thursday, May 26, global music superstars Shaggy and Sting performed a captivating album release show at New York’s iconic Blue Note Jazz Club. This event was organized by Sting, who produced Shaggy’s latest studio offering, “Com Fly Wid […]]]>

Shaggy and Sting at the Blue Note Jazz Club in New York. Photo credit: Herman Canosa

On Thursday, May 26, global music superstars Shaggy and Sting performed a captivating album release show at New York’s iconic Blue Note Jazz Club.

This event was organized by Sting, who produced Shaggy’s latest studio offering, “Com Fly Wid Mi”, which features songs from Frank Sinatra’s songbook in a distinct reggae style, and they were joined by a section talented brass band which included such talented instrumentalists as Karl Wright on drums, Paul Nowinski on bass, Andy Bassford on guitar, Sydney Mills on keyboards, Rob Mathis on keyboard, Greg Lapine on saxophone and trumpeters Kevin Bachelor and Matt McDonald , among other talented musicians.

Sting praised the Blue Note Jazz Club for being a “historic place” and he shared that “the most important element of music is surprise”. “It’s a big surprise,” Sting admitted of his latest musical effort with Shaggy, where they successfully tackle some of the biggest hits from Frank Sinatra’s catalog.

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Sting praised Shaggy for having the “same voice” as Frank Sinatra, noting his “baritone tenor,” and he shared how the idea for this concept album came to fruition.

Sting revealed that some of the album was made in Jamaica, as well as Miami, Florida (where Shaggy lives), but much of it was completed at Capitol Studios in California, where ironically enough , Frank Sinatra himself recorded some of his biggest hits.

Sting added that it’s the type of record that will make listeners smile, and rightfully so.

Shaggy opened his set accordingly with “That’s Life”, where he was able to draw the audience in from the opening note, and he immediately burst into a lively, mid-tempo version of “Come Fly With Me”. He slowed down the tempo on “That Old Black Magic,” which had a neat groove.

Shaggy pointed out that most reggae tunes have two chords, but these classic songs had at least five. “Me and Sting are allergic to boredom,” Shaggy said of the birth of the album.

“Fly Me to the Moon” was thrilling and he was able to give “Luck Be A Lady” a refreshing, nonchalant edge.

Halfway through the show, Shaggy invited Sting to sing on stage with him and Sting graciously accepted his invitation, and they performed “You Make Me Feel So Young”. Sting added that he was an “expensive background singer”.

It was followed by “Under My Skin”, which was pure bliss, and an added treat was hearing Shaggy nail “Angel Eyes” (one of Frank Sinatra’s more obscure tunes and rarities) and “Witchcraft ” live. Shaggy’s catchy rendition of “Saturday Night” was equally impressive.

“Com Fly Wid Me” sung by Shaggy (produced by Sting) is available on digital service providers by clicking here.

The verdict

Shaggy and Sting were outstanding at the Blue Note Jazz Club in Manhattan. It was an enjoyable night of Frank Sinatra music in a booming reggae and blues style. This show was a substantial indication that Shaggy’s “Com Fly Wid Me” is worth watching. Well done all around.

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Australian jazz trumpeter Bob Barnard dies aged 88 – The Syncopated Times https://iridiumjazz.com/australian-jazz-trumpeter-bob-barnard-dies-aged-88-the-syncopated-times/ Wed, 25 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/australian-jazz-trumpeter-bob-barnard-dies-aged-88-the-syncopated-times/ Important Australian jazz trumpeter Bob Barnard died on May 7, he was 88 years old. Along with his older brother, drummer Len Barnard, he was an integral part of the emerging Australian traditional jazz scene of the 1950s. Like young fans in the UK and elsewhere, the early 1950s found him looking for records by […]]]>

Important Australian jazz trumpeter Bob Barnard died on May 7, he was 88 years old. Along with his older brother, drummer Len Barnard, he was an integral part of the emerging Australian traditional jazz scene of the 1950s. Like young fans in the UK and elsewhere, the early 1950s found him looking for records by Muggsy, Bunk, Bechet and George Lewis, but unlike many of his peers he came from a musical family and was already familiar with Louis and Bix when he learned cornet to fill an opening in the family band.

After playing around Melbourne he moved to Sydney, soon joining Graeme Bell’s All Stars where he was a vital member in the 1960s. After leaving Bell he fronted his own bands while performing with many other bands into a thriving jazz scene. He recorded several memorable albums on the Swaggie Records label.

In the 1980s he became well known to the general public in Australia with numerous television appearances and notable collaborations with the Kenny Powell Orchestra, Ricky May and the Julian Lee Orchestra. He will be remembered as a former statesman of the Australian music scene. He passed on the legacy within his own family, with children and grandchildren working as professional musicians.

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Manly Jazz, 2022: Festival returns after two-year COVID hiatus | Northern Beaches Review https://iridiumjazz.com/manly-jazz-2022-festival-returns-after-two-year-covid-hiatus-northern-beaches-review/ Tue, 24 May 2022 01:39:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/manly-jazz-2022-festival-returns-after-two-year-covid-hiatus-northern-beaches-review/ AUSTRALIA’s longest-running jazz festival returns to Manly this spring, with two big days of music on 24 and 25 September. Now in its 45th year, Manly Jazz is renowned for its stunning location, stellar lineup of local and international musicians and laid-back beach vibe. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the festival has been held online […]]]>

AUSTRALIA’s longest-running jazz festival returns to Manly this spring, with two big days of music on 24 and 25 September.

Now in its 45th year, Manly Jazz is renowned for its stunning location, stellar lineup of local and international musicians and laid-back beach vibe.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the festival has been held online for the past two years. But this year, the Corso and the surrounding streets and alleys will come alive with jazz and the event is expected to attract thousands of people.

Northern Beaches Council Mayor Michael Regan said the return of Manly Jazz would be a lively celebration for locals and visitors alike.

“After two years of disruption, we are delighted to bring back our big events to support our local musicians and performers and liven up our streets again,” he said.

jazz musicians in the country will be there for Manly Jazz. Image: Provided” title=”Some of the best jazz musicians in the country will be there for Manly Jazz. Image: Provided” width=”5760″ height=”3840″ itemprop=”image”/>

Some of the best jazz musicians in the country will be there for Manly Jazz. Image: Provided

“Manly Jazz continues to attract visitors from Sydney and beyond, boosting our local economy, especially as businesses recover from the economic impacts of the pandemic.

“That’s why, together with the Manly Business Chamber, we’ve moved the festival from the long weekend in October to a less busy weekend in September, providing a great weekend of music while supporting businesses local markets during a traditionally calmer commercial period.”

There’s something for everyone, with a wide range of jazz planned, from traditional New Orleans jazz to funk, Latin, fusion, blues, gospel, swing and roots.

Artistic director Caroline Speight said the return of Manly Jazz was good news for local artists to be able to perform at events again.

FUN TIMES: Manly Jazz is <a class=Australia‘s longest running jazz festival. Image: Provided” title=”FUN TIMES: Manly Jazz is Australia’s longest running jazz festival. Image: Provided” width=”4000″ height=”2373″ itemprop=”image”/>

FUN TIMES: Manly Jazz is Australia’s longest running jazz festival. Image: Provided

“We look forward to rediscovering the joy of sharing the excitement of great jazz live at the 45th Manly Jazz, creating hope and healing the community through the arts and performance,” she said.

“We are committed to honoring the Manly Jazz legacy, showcasing iconic jazz musicians and supporting young rising stars through a diverse arts program.”

The program will be unveiled at the end of July.

Do you have something to say? Send a letter to the editor to: editor@northernbeachesreview.com.au

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Sydney Con Jazz Festival 2022 – City Hub Sydney https://iridiumjazz.com/sydney-con-jazz-festival-2022-city-hub-sydney/ Sun, 22 May 2022 23:25:56 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/sydney-con-jazz-festival-2022-city-hub-sydney/ Picture: provided By Amber Griffin the Sydney Con Jazz Festival will return to Sydney for the fifth time on June 5. The festival will take place at the Sydney Conservatory of Music, with over 100 pioneering jazz artists from Australia, the United States and Europe performing. A myriad of jazz music will pour through […]]]>


Picture: provided

By Amber Griffin

the Sydney Con Jazz Festival will return to Sydney for the fifth time on June 5. The festival will take place at the Sydney Conservatory of Music, with over 100 pioneering jazz artists from Australia, the United States and Europe performing.

A myriad of jazz music will pour through five world-class concert halls, including more than 23 concerts and events. All of these performances and more in the space of a jazz-filled day.

“Once you are familiar with jazz, you hear it everywhere”

Performing at Sydney Con Jazz Festival in the headlining musical group Trio Grande – with Eric Harland. The bill will also feature a saxophone solo by Florian Ross-Architexture and saxophone playing extraordinaire Will Vinson.

Asked about the significance of the festival, Vinson shared with city ​​hub that without jazz music, none of the popular music of the 21st century would exist as it does.

“Once you are familiar with jazz, you hear it in everything, in harmony, rhythm, voice, inflection.”

Vinson explained that both of her performances at the festival will be “unpredictable”. Artists are precisely blended together from different musical backgrounds to create never-before-seen and unique jazz performances that the audience will collectively experience for the first and only time during the event.

For one day only, the festival will be a celebration of jazz and its varied and vibrant music that you will want to experience firsthand. the Sydney Con Jazz Festival is a pearl in the oyster of the Sydney music scene, with unrivaled performances from artists around the world.

“Australian audiences understand what they listen to and have a real openness and kind of appetite for foreign music that comes from being so far away,” Vinson said. city ​​hub with the desire to perform again in Sydney.

June 5. Sydney Conservatory of Music, 1 Conservatory Rd, Sydney. Various prices. Tickets & Info: www.sydneyconjazzfestival.com

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Yarni shares ‘Cherub’ single ‘Cherub’ influenced by 70s jazz funk and announces album night in Sydney and Matilda in Sheffield https://iridiumjazz.com/yarni-shares-cherub-single-cherub-influenced-by-70s-jazz-funk-and-announces-album-night-in-sydney-and-matilda-in-sheffield/ Thu, 19 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/yarni-shares-cherub-single-cherub-influenced-by-70s-jazz-funk-and-announces-album-night-in-sydney-and-matilda-in-sheffield/ Inspired by the ’70s jazz-funk track “Why Did You Do It” by Stretch, “Cherub” features saxophonist Jonoa’s innate swing and bassist Ally McMahon’s metronomic movement. Yarni invited the set to record whatever came their way, “there were so many great takes coming up that it was just a matter of editing them into a flowing […]]]>

Inspired by the ’70s jazz-funk track “Why Did You Do It” by Stretch, “Cherub” features saxophonist Jonoa’s innate swing and bassist Ally McMahon’s metronomic movement.

Yarni invited the set to record whatever came their way, “there were so many great takes coming up that it was just a matter of editing them into a flowing arrangement,” says Yarni.

Hailed as “incredible” by the late and great electronics icon Andrew Weatherall, Yarni is a purely self-taught multi-instrumentalist, who has spent years honing his technical skills and tastes through an ever-evolving creative journey.

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To celebrate the release of their upcoming album ‘Pigna’, Yarni are hosting a free party in Sheffield on Saturday June 4

His explorations into the world of electronic music produced the first audio-visual album “Entkommen”, inspired by the juxtaposition of brutalist architecture with nature in Derbyshire.

“I learned that the minute you start trending, you’re already behind”

Yarni is enthusiastic, his musical journey is based on an authentic artistic identity.

‘Cherub’ follows recent release ‘Nova’ which ended up being added to the esteemed playlists, All New Jazz on Spotify and Jazz Scene: UK on Apple Music.

“One to watch this year” according to Jazz FM.

Earlier single ‘In A Dream’ was backed in their Bandcamp Fridays Picks, while latest track ‘Nova’ was shown on BBC 6 Music.

To celebrate the release of his forthcoming album ‘Pigna’ Yarni is hosting a free party in Sheffield on Saturday 4th June, the free event will be hosted at Sidney & Matilda in the new ‘Forest Room’, part of Sidney Summer Weekender.

The show will see Yarni debut his new live set in which he mixes electronic sounds with live instrumentation with help from close collaborator Jonoa on sax and percussion.

Yarni will perform live arrangements of tracks from last year’s album ‘Boro’, the upcoming album ‘Pigna’ and his upcoming album with friend Give Me Monaco.

Between performances, Yarni will provide a soundtrack of music that has influenced her journey so far.

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Bob Barnard propelled Australian jazz to world high note https://iridiumjazz.com/bob-barnard-propelled-australian-jazz-to-world-high-note/ Wed, 18 May 2022 00:43:24 +0000 https://iridiumjazz.com/bob-barnard-propelled-australian-jazz-to-world-high-note/ In 1974, he formed his own band with Chris Taperell (piano), John McCarthy (clarinet), John Costelloe (trombone), Wally Wickham (bass) and Lawrie Thompson (drums). The band enjoyed a long residency at Rocks Push, then Sydney’s premier jazz club. They toured extensively across Australia, before taking the international jazz scene by storm. At the 1976 Bix […]]]>

In 1974, he formed his own band with Chris Taperell (piano), John McCarthy (clarinet), John Costelloe (trombone), Wally Wickham (bass) and Lawrie Thompson (drums). The band enjoyed a long residency at Rocks Push, then Sydney’s premier jazz club. They toured extensively across Australia, before taking the international jazz scene by storm. At the 1976 Bix Beiderbecke Festival in Iowa, for example, the audience went wild. They had never heard of anything like this: a non-American band playing jazz (originally from the United States) so much better than a lot of Americans. How, they wondered, was this possible? For international audiences, Australian jazz had arrived – and it was here to stay.

Bob’s band has toured America, Canada, South East Asia, UK, all over Europe. They even played in Tehran, in the days leading up to the overthrow of the shah. Back home, Bob was a household name; in 1980 the streets of a new housing estate on Queensland’s Gold Coast were named after Bob and the members of his band, an honor not usually given to musicians. Our house often hosted musicians from abroad: big names like Cat Anderson, Bobby Hackett (who ate cornflakes in our living room), Kenny Ball, Acker Bilk, Oscar Peterson and many others.

Band leader Bob Barnard welcomed his daughter Loretta to Sydney after her five-week, 10,000-mile tour of the United States in 1976.Credit:Fairfax

As a solo artist from the mid-1980s until his retirement about five years ago, Bob toured the world – accompanied by his wife Danielle whom he married in 1993 – performing and recording with the biggest names in international jazz. He has appeared several times at all national and international jazz festivals, often as headliners. He even had an entire jazz festival named after him, the Bob Barnard Jazz Party, held annually between 1999 and 2008 in Melbourne. During his illustrious career, he has made countless recordings: under his own name, as a sideman or as a guest artist.

Bob often talked about career highlights, such as recording naked dance (1961) with brother Len; performing with Louis Armstrong on the tarmac at Sydney Airport in 1963; registration Music until midnight in 1980, where he was accompanied by a large string orchestra under the direction of pianist Kenny Powell; Do just having fun (1987) with singer Ricky May.

Bob Barnard plays Louis Armstrong's trumpet in New York.

Bob Barnard plays Louis Armstrong’s trumpet in New York.Credit:

It was an integral part of the iconic the Lord of the Rings series composed by John Sangster. Never underestimated, he recorded a reinterpretation of pieces from the classical repertoire with the pianist Julian Lee in 1979. He received the Order of Australia in 1990 for his considerable contribution to Australian music and his role as an ambassador of Australian jazz; in 2010 he was inducted into the Australian Bell Jazz Awards Hall of Fame.

In 2012, with his writer daughter Loretta, he wrote his pictorial memoir, which barely scratched the surface of a life well lived. Over the past few years, although his mind has remained razor sharp, Bob’s physical health has steadily deteriorated. He especially regretted not being able to attend the concerts of other musicians. He retained his sense of humor, however: the day before his death, he told a few jokes, always reveling in puns and the absurdity of life.

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Bob has mentored thousands of musicians and been admired across all musical genres. Since his death on May 7, 2022 from complications associated with prostate cancer, there has been an astonishing torrent of tributes from around the world, with people acknowledging his unquestioned influence and generosity of spirit.

A master musician, a gentleman, Bob is survived by Danielle; his children from his first marriage to Patricia Greig: Loretta, Tony and Adam; four grandchildren, a great-granddaughter and stepsons Marc and Philip Boass.

The musical gene, if such a thing exists, has been passed down to sons, Tony (guitar) and Adam (drums), and grandsons, pianists Beau Golden and Casey Golden. They say music is in the blood. Maybe they are right.

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